The quality of meat you’re using is essential for the long-term health of your dog. Yes, very cheap commercial dog food is rarely made out of high-quality ingredients either, but that’s nevertheless a problem that you too must be wary of when you’re cooking your own dog’s dinner. It's time consuming to be picky about the ingredients you'll use in your Fido's meal, but something that cannot be avoided.
I have a very obes,e dog, Jack Russell named Charlie. His owner ,myself experienced an accident while at work which caused me to become wheel chair bound for four months which limited Charlie from any exercise.. Living by myself no one could walk him. His exercise became no more. Now Charlie is very over weight Doctor said he needs to lose weight, Vet suggested Metabolic dry food by Hill’s Science Diet . Is home made recipes for dogs better for weight loss or this Rx dog food . Can someone give me some good advice . I am really considering home made. I invested in Science Diet healthy weight, Charlie refuses to eat. Is not appealing at all.
I’m assuming you are changing over to a homemade diet because you have health concerns related to commercially produced dog food. Please research the contents of ALL commercial foods. You will be appalled. It ranges in offensiveness from low quality, to poisonous and downright carcinogenic. Proteins are frequently comprised of beaks, feathers, and high temperature steamed bonemeal. The most common source of “animal protein” is actually a meal that is produced using euthanized, ill farm and COMPANION animals…..as well as the medications that were in their systems when they were eventually determined to be terminal. There are a multitude of articles online with which you can educate yourself about the heinous nature of commercial dog food (yes, even the “premium” foods) so I guess the short answer is…..NO, if you care about what your dog is eating, don’t feed anything that you purchase human grade ingredients and prepare yourself! Btw, organic is best if you can afford it. The chemicals in human food are just as detrimental to your dog as they are for you, although having a shorter lifespan, they obviously won’t suffer some of the cumulative affects that humans do.
Cleaning the Cutters - You want to clean your dog cookie cutters as soon as your dog biscuits are in the oven. Using warm water and mild soap is usually all you'll need. Once they are washed, place them on a clean baking sheet and pop them into the oven for a couple minutes. This will help them to dry completely and avoid rust. Once they are cooled, they can be stored.
It’s Earth Day — or Earth Month, as we prefer! — so naturally, we’re turning our focus to the kitchen. And specifically ways we can create less waste and be more efficient and thoughtful with our output. Between packaging and food scraps, some degree of kitchen waste feels inevitable. For most, there’s no way to eliminate it entirely, but there are a lot of small and easy ways to limit the amount of waste coming out of our kitchens.
Hello and thanks for the comment! We believe that having a diet consisting of 50% vegetables of assorted colors and types provides the necessary vitamins needed for any living being. Regarding feeding your dog raw: we completely respect your position and appreciate that you are feeding raw to your dog. Canine Journal has never taken a stance on raw diets. We only shared what the American Veterinary Medical Association’s position is on the matter. We only said that the AVMA is not ok with raw. This is not misinformation this is a fact to show that the AVMA is not behind this. That does not mean that other vets are not behind it. Wishing you and your pup a healthy winter!
I am making food for my 7 year old shih tzu. I have read books and am putting in 1/4 tea egg shells for calcium and some chicken liver with the meat, vegetables and rice or other grain I use to make the food. Would I need to add a supplement? What do you suggest? My Vet was concerned about me making the food. After a scare with a recall that I did not know about until months after my dog was having problems, I cannot imaging that the canned food I used is better for my dog. But, I want to make the food and make it the best I can. Thank you.

Surprisingly, there's a number of homemade dog food recipes found online that consist of things that no dog should consume (or consume very little, yet the recipe mentions dangerous amounts). Some of the more extreme examples include giving your dog large amounts of garlic as a way to prevent intestinal worms or feeding your pup avocado, “because it’s healthy for people”.
With all the recalls and my concern over ingredients, I started cooking 2 yrs ago for my guy. The base for his dog food is quinoa with flax and chia seeds. I cook the grain, adding coconut oil and turmeric. I top this with a protein- good organic chicken, boneless pork, scrambled egg with shell included, occasionally beef – a veggie addition depends on what I have– carrot, green bean , spinach- add a tbsp of pumpkin, and plain yoghurt. All the eyestain on my little white dog has DISAPPEARED ! His energy is great, and no more itchy skin. He loves dinner!! And he seems to feel as good as he looks!
Top Dog Tips is here to provide dog owners with the most accurate and in-depth tips and advice on dog care, health, nutrition and training from the industry experts – veterinarians, dog trainers, groomers and animal scientists. We help dog owners effortlessly choose the best dog supplies on the market. We buy, test, review and rank pet products to help you avoid the bad stuff and purchase only what's best for you and your dog.

Also, keep in mind that each of these best homemade dog food recipes requires additional supplements such as zinc, choline, vitamin D and E, copper, calcium or others, depending on your dog's nutritional needs. The reason I haven’t listed them is that the correct dosages depends on the age, breed, size and pre-existing health conditions of your dog – you really must consult with a vet or canine nutritionist about these things.


I have a very obes,e dog, Jack Russell named Charlie. His owner ,myself experienced an accident while at work which caused me to become wheel chair bound for four months which limited Charlie from any exercise.. Living by myself no one could walk him. His exercise became no more. Now Charlie is very over weight Doctor said he needs to lose weight, Vet suggested Metabolic dry food by Hill’s Science Diet . Is home made recipes for dogs better for weight loss or this Rx dog food . Can someone give me some good advice . I am really considering home made. I invested in Science Diet healthy weight, Charlie refuses to eat. Is not appealing at all.
I personally don’t consider 80 degrees F to be a bad temperature to walk your dog in. I live in Iowa and our summers days are often hotter than that, even in the evening around 5:30pm when I walk my dog. Like you said, I make sure to bring water with us and give her rests in the shade if need be. Overall, it’s important to know your dog’s tolerance level. For my dog, Sally, she is perfectly comfortable in those conditions. However, there are some dogs who may struggle in similar conditions.
Awesome recipes! Our yellow lab loves the turkey/rice/veggie mix and the chicken jerky strips! Was surprised that our dog loved the rosemary spice in the turkey recipe. Just made the beef/rice meal in the crock pot yesterday and it passed the taste test! Thank you for sharing these great nutritious recipes. Our lab has a lot of energy with these well rounded recipes!
One of his favorite meals is chicken baked in a little water, no spices, salt or pepper, added to some steamed carrots, sweet potato, acorn squash, broccoli some raspberries and blue berries. I usually make enough for 2 meals per day for 5 days. Everything I’ve learned says keep in the fridge no more than 3-5 days….so I push it a bit with the 5 days.I hope what I’ve learned will help someone. I suggest doing a lot of research, it seems that feeding our loved little pets can harm them if we feed them the wrong things over a period of time.
I made some homemade food for my 2 Labrador dogs. I made a 2 canners full using meat trimmings when we butchered our deer and elk. I added only 1 cup of brown rice to each canner of meat and a bag of chopped carrots to each. I have been using Rachel Ray dry dog food – 3 cups per dog and 1/2 cup of my home made food per day . The dogs are producing an ENORMOUS amount of poop! Is it the combo of the 2 & will it stop once I run out of the dry food? My husband is going nuts!
I have always cooked for my dogs but, they also get a premium kibble with their home cooked foods. This way, I know they get the nutrition they needs. I supplement with fresh fruits and veggies everyday as well. They’re all extremely healthy with zero issues. Dogs should still have some kibble, it is nutritionally complete, good for their teeth. For my senior, I soften his. I wouldn’t and, have never relied on my homemade foods as a sole source of their nutrition. Just slow cook whatever they can eat, they’ll love you for it 🙂
So dairy products may not make you dog drop down dead, but they’re still not good for dogs! It’s annoying because SO many dog products have dairy in them EVEN IN HOME MADE RECIPES! Dairy, through studies, has lactose in it–which may cause a real stomach upset in some dogs! Although some dogs are fine with dairy (tough stomachs!) I prefer to avoid it along with the risk of sickness and stomach upset.
​No Crockpot?  No problem - just make a potato beef stew with whatever pot you have around the kitchen, your dog will appreciate the effort all the same. Amanda even takes it a step further and supplements her dog food with extra dog vitamins, which is a great idea. Just make sure you talk to the Vet first so they can receive the optimal level of nutrients needed for your dog.
The quality of meat you’re using is essential for the long-term health of your dog. Yes, very cheap commercial dog food is rarely made out of high-quality ingredients either, but that’s nevertheless a problem that you too must be wary of when you’re cooking your own dog’s dinner. It's time consuming to be picky about the ingredients you'll use in your Fido's meal, but something that cannot be avoided.
Kitchn’s Delicious Links column highlights recipes we’re excited about from the bloggers we love. Follow along every weekday as we post our favorites.Flank steak is a great way to mix up proteins during the week, so your dinner isn’t all chicken, every day. It’s a comparatively inexpensive cut of beef, and I find it way easier to cook than chicken, because you don’t need to worry nearly as much about getting the meat to the exact right temperature.
Lori Lapierre holds a Bachelor of Arts and Science in public relations/communications. For 17 years, she worked for a Fortune 500 company before purchasing a business and starting a family. She is a regular freelancer for "Living Light News," an award-winning national publication. Her past writing experience includes school news reporting, church drama, in-house business articles and a self-published mystery, "Duty Free Murder."
With all the recalls and my concern over ingredients, I started cooking 2 yrs ago for my guy. The base for his dog food is quinoa with flax and chia seeds. I cook the grain, adding coconut oil and turmeric. I top this with a protein- good organic chicken, boneless pork, scrambled egg with shell included, occasionally beef – a veggie addition depends on what I have– carrot, green bean , spinach- add a tbsp of pumpkin, and plain yoghurt. All the eyestain on my little white dog has DISAPPEARED ! His energy is great, and no more itchy skin. He loves dinner!! And he seems to feel as good as he looks!

As I eat my weight in sweet strawberries this time of year, the subject of what to do with the abundance of spring and summer fruit comes to mind. I am usually more than content with enjoying berries and stone fruit as-is, but when I’ve gone a little overboard at the farmers market, jam is one of the many things I consider making. Or is it jelly? The two terms for fruit spread have always confused me a bit. Luckily, there’s an easy way to distinguish between the two.
Hi Kathy! I believe there was a link toward the beginning of the article but, for a puppy, the general rule (from what I understand) is 1/2 a cup for every 5 pounds of weight. So, if your pup weighs 15 pounds, you’d feed it 1 1/2 cups a day, ideally splitting it into three servings (most commonly 7am, 12pm, and 5pm) of 1/2 a cup. I hope I helped you out a bit!
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