Thanks, and the reason for the discrepancy is because I’ve added a couple more recipes to this list recently. I did update the title and heading and in the body of the article itself, but I haven’t updated all the images yet (one of them says 22, and the one at the top still says 23). Thanks for the reminder, it’s something I’ve been meaning to get around to.
Oven baked with love and coated in raw goodness, the first biscuit treats that truly mirror a whole prey diet! Our Raw Coated Biscuits are full of meat and organ meat for a treat as nature intended that your dog will go wild for! We start with the world’s finest ingredients. Next we gently bake with love in small batches and finally we coat every biscuit in raw goodness to make the perfect treat!

No, we’re not implying your new canine culinary skills will cause your pet to throw up. We’re referring to the raw diet fad, more affectionately known as “BARF” (which stands for Biologically Appropriate Raw Food). BARF has gained a lot of popularity among dog owners over the last few years. The basic idea is to feed your dog raw meats, grains and veggies just as his canine ancestors ate millions of years ago.
Most companies that makes homemade dog food include the heart, kidneys,and liver of whatever meat you want. Do you have recipes that include these ingredients? They charge at Least$200 a month to feed my dog if I order online homemade but if I get these ingredients at the butcher it’s only about $12 for the organs so I want to do it myself. Can you please suggest recipes that include these?
From fetching his favorite ball to successfully sitting on command, your dog deserves delicious and healthy dog treats. In addition to your verbal praise and affection, there's nothing your dog enjoys more than some mouth-watering rawhide bones or crunchy training treats. Having a natural inclination to please, dogs love to be praised, which is why it's important that they be rewarded with healthy dog biscuits. Healthy dog treats can also add variety to your dog's diet. And because peanut butter dog treats are a fan favorite, they are often available in varieties that provide additional nutritional support under the cloak of their delicious flavor. There are treats enriched with glucosamine to promote better hip and joint health, wheat-grass for better digestion, and more. For dogs with allergies, there are hypoallergenic organic dog treats that are wheat, gluten and corn-free, and even low-calorie treats for less active dogs.
I tried to make the Beef Stew and the recipe had me confused (easy to do ). In the listing of ingredients, it says 1/2 cup of flour, and “ 1/2 cup water or organic vegetable oil, plus 1 Tablespoon vegetable oil for frying.” So is that correct? 1/2 cup of water OR 1/2 cup of oil?? Isn’t that kind of a lot of oil? Anyway, I tried the 1/2 cup of water and with 1/2 cup of flour, this became a big ball of yuck. What did I do wrong??
When your pooch refuses to eat commercial dog food, be it dry or canned, then sooner or later you might be faced with a problem: you won't have any prepared DIY homemade dog food meals on hand (due to lack of time or whatnot) at home and your canine may be refusing to eat anything else. Fortunately, this is relatively easy to avoid by feeding your dog some commercial dog food from time to time from an early age.

As an example, my dog (100 pounds) eats 3-4 cups per day (plus measured out treats). If I just used the amount he ate in one day there might be enough difference to have an effect. His food is 393 kcal/cup. He needs about 1200-1600 kcals a day from his food- or 1400/day. If I change food all I have to do is a bit of math and I’ve got what he should be eating. One food may be digested better or worse than another so you still have to feel the ribs. Calories, not volume or weight, is the way to go.
“In 2015, the World Health Organization found that processed meats such as bacon and sausage were known carcinogens linked to cancer. Bacon is an incredibly rich and fatty food with a high salt content, which can prove to be too much for a dog’s stomach to handle. Eating a large amount can cause pancreatitis, which can be fatal.” [http://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/natural-foods/can-dogs-eat-pork/]”
I am have 4 100+lb dogs I make there food and fix it fresh every meal yes it is time consuming I have one female around 120 or lbs she breaks out after eating her meals in hives and it is worse if given Benadryl she is 3 yrs old I need some help I have changed diet and when I think I have found something that works I delivered these dogs so this is an old problem . HELP
All of the above dog food recipes will be deficient in many essential nutrients. There is no significant source of calcium or adequate sources of micronutrients such as B vitamins, vitamin D, etc. In addition to lacking calcium, the calcium:phosphorus ratio is an important consideration. Please consult your veterinarian before feeding any home diet. These are not adequate!!

When those are cooked and cooled, I mix everything together in a large mixing bowl and add one can of no salt added green beans and a 29 ounce can of pumpkin. It might take two batches to mix everything thoroughly (at least in the bowl I have). This feeds my 70 pound husky mix for four to five days, depending on how heavy-handed I am at feeding time.
When preparing homemade dog treats, make sure you take into account any allergies that your pet has to specific ingredients. You will want to avoid adding any ingredient that you suspect that your pet has reacted poorly to in the past. If you are experimenting with new flavors, only feed a small amount of the treat to your dog to see how she reacts to it before giving him an entire treat.
When those are cooked and cooled, I mix everything together in a large mixing bowl and add one can of no salt added green beans and a 29 ounce can of pumpkin. It might take two batches to mix everything thoroughly (at least in the bowl I have). This feeds my 70 pound husky mix for four to five days, depending on how heavy-handed I am at feeding time.
This post totally cracked me up! Mainly because I have been thinking of making little pup treats for 2 weeks now. I’ve been hooked on Diane’s Gingie cookies (see OvenHug for the best gingie recipe eh=vah) and making them non-stop. Our finicky little chihuahua mix loves sharing bites with me. I want to make a gluten free version of my gingies so that our senior pup, Oscar can also join us – he has sensitive tummy issues. I just need to find a bone shaped cookie cutter and we’re in business. Thanks for the laughs. Your pup cookies look amazin’! Thanks for sharing. xo
If your pup loves to chew, make your own chew strips with fresh chicken. Slice chicken breasts into 1/8" thick strips and dehydrate in an oven set to 200 degrees Fahrenheit for about two hours, or until the chicken is dried and chewy. Sprinkle with anise prior to drying for extra flavor. Turkey also can be substituted. Poultry chews make a nice alternative to rawhide treats, which could contain chemicals or preservatives. Store extra chews in the refrigerator or freezer. Chicken jerky can also be made in the microwave by cooking the strips for 20 minutes on medium power until they are chewy.
​No Crockpot?  No problem - just make a potato beef stew with whatever pot you have around the kitchen, your dog will appreciate the effort all the same. Amanda even takes it a step further and supplements her dog food with extra dog vitamins, which is a great idea. Just make sure you talk to the Vet first so they can receive the optimal level of nutrients needed for your dog.

I’ve been making these for a long time now. My dog, Lola, knows by the smell when I’m baking for her and is in the kitchen the whole time! To make it easier, I use a pizza cutter and make 1x3” long strips instead of the bone shape. It is much faster with less rolling and these strips fit very nicely into Lola’s Kong. I use all natural peanut butter, and if I remember, get it freshly ground at the grocery store. I also buy the real Ceylon cinnamon to avoid any coumarin overdose if I give her too many treats.
I take charge and responsibility for my dog. I realize Vets are so called professionals, but my dog is very dear to me. I do what I think is best. And because she has seizures I am researching an opt out for rabies shots. She is healthy, runs like a puppy and since I don’t give her chemicals besides her meds, she seems happier. She was given to me about 7 or 8 years ago so I don’t know her exact age. She is all muscle and strong. I hope this helps someone. Thanks for reading.
Frittatas have long been my go-to solution anytime I need to use up the sad-looking produce, wilting herbs, and little nubs of cheese in my fridge. It’s not often I make them with a plan — until now. Inspired by my favorite cheesy dip and the warm spring weather, I came up with a frittata loaded with garlicky marinated artichoke hearts, earthy baby spinach, salty Parm, and rich sour cream. I knew it would be good, but it went above and beyond all of my expectations.
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Hi Matt, Thanks for your question. You can make sure your dog gets calcium and fatty acids by sprinkling a powdered supplement or drops to your dog’s meals. There are many products on the market. Because the serving size varies widely based on your dog’s weight and other factors, we urge you to consult your vet for the best recommendations for your pup.
While DIY dog food recipes can be fun to make and a healthy alternative to consuming canned food or kibble, they may still lack all the essential minerals and vitamins needed. So in addition to PetPlate, we encourage you to check out these other dog food delivery options that are specially formulated by dog nutritionists and shipped directly to you for your pup to enjoy.

Also, the things you said about a raw diet is 100% false. The AVMA may not be behind it but there are many vets that advocate a raw diet. I have been feeding my dog a PMR (prey model raw) diet for a year and just started my 7 month old pup on it and they’ve never been healthier. If you’re clean and sanitary in your meat handling and clean up, like you would be if it were for your own consumption, it’s completely safe.
Soft & chewy Buddy Biscuits are palatable with no crunch. An excellent choice for all dogs, especially older dogs or smaller dogs who prefer a softer treat. Along with indulging your pup, Buddy Soft & Chewy treats are also perfect for training, with a low calorie count and chock full of flavor to keep your dog motivated. Buddy Biscuits are also oven baked in the USA with only quality, recognizable ingredients. Healthy dog treats made with quality ingredients and natural peanut butter. Palatable, chewy dog treats perfect for older dogs. Baked in USA only. Contain no added corn, soy, fillers,artificial colors, flavors and artificial preservatives

Hi I am new to this site and have an Anatolian Sheperd and a Heinz 57 that I am going to start supplementing their kibble with your great recipes. I have a question on the yogurt and since I know it is a great probiotic how is it that dogs can eat it and not have digestive issues since it is dairy? My big guy weighs about 110 lbs and the gal about 60. She can eat anything he has a sensitive gut and I have been told a little yogurt wil help. Thanks
I have a 9 year old toy poodle mix and a 5 year old shih tzu- and they are very finicky so I started cooking for them and my vet was okay with it. I make either turkey or chicken I use brown rice, green peas ,green beans, carrots, zucchini, pumpkin/ or sweet potatoes and sometimes broccoli and cauliflower. I cook the ground meat with olive oil then cut and boil all vegetables let both sit then cook rice. I mix everything together and I will add a can of dog pumpkin (low in sugar) I make a big pot and freeze in big freezer 1 gallon bag which is 1 week for both dogs. I usually cook once a month. My dogs love it they lick the plates. Seems happier. I also saw where people are worried about calcium, well I give my dogs every morning 3 tablespoon of goat milk for each dog. It does take about an hour or so to complete the receipt but worth it. My dogs haven’t gained weight and because of all the water in vegetables they hardly drink water which they drank so much with commercial food. It makes me so happy to see them happy
My dogs used to love all of the soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits flavors. They were easy to break up into soft bits that my tiny and toothless dogs could eat. Around the fall of 2018, I noticed that the treats were arriving hard and not chewy. I assumed they were stale, but after trying more bags, I realized that the company has changed them. They should not label them as soft and chewy anymore. Also, the bags also used to state that the treats are "grain-free", while wheat flour was the 2nd ingredient on the bag! They have removed that claim from the bags, but it made me wonder about the company's awareness of their product, if they have made multiple mistakes in regards to claims and labeling. I've found another truly soft treat here on Amazon that my dogs prefer, and are able to eat.
“In 2015, the World Health Organization found that processed meats such as bacon and sausage were known carcinogens linked to cancer. Bacon is an incredibly rich and fatty food with a high salt content, which can prove to be too much for a dog’s stomach to handle. Eating a large amount can cause pancreatitis, which can be fatal.” [http://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/natural-foods/can-dogs-eat-pork/]”
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