The opposite problem with DIY homemade dog food recipes is also very common – forgetting to include essential ingredients in your dog’s meal. I've mentioned some of these above – skipping on the vitamins, minerals, and amino acid supplements is often overlooked by pet owners. Samantha has previously explained which supplements may be required for homemade dog food meals, and how to use them safely.
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I have been cooking for my Boston Terrier for about 4 months now. She kept throwing up every dog food I bought, and it wasn’t cheap food either. I boil whole chicken, and then the rice,buy frozen vegetables, green beans, peas, carrots, spinach, and want to check on adding something else because she is still shedding so bad and can’t figure out why. I give her a multivitamin from GNC for dogs and wondered if she needs something else. When I take her to the vet I’m going to have her checked because she still chokes and throws up but not like with the dog food. She had some throat problems when she was a puppy, he said was tonsillitis, but I’m thinking she has something wrong with her soft palate or stomach. At least making her food is better than having her throw up every day. I do use coconut oil in the recipe. So sweet potatoes or potatoes would be good to add to? I cook all mine up in a big pot and put in quart freezer bags and it lasts a month. I’ve even started giving my bully about 1 cup w/his dry food and he’s got skin problems he’s doing better. Is there something I can use for her hair?
You’ve been at this “business” a while and it would seem you have heard everything under the sun. As I read your comments above, I noticed how patient and kind you are with each person who comments, even if you’ve said the same thing a hundred times, lol. I’m in marketing, and I’m sure you’ve heard this before, but just wanted to point out that your heading and claim could be considered confusing. I landed on your page following a link, “25 Simple Dog Treat Recipes: 5 Ingredients or less.” When I arrived on your page, the heading said “23 Simple Dog Treat Recipes: 5 Ingredients or less.” Perhaps most people wouldn’t notice that the information doesn’t match, but being a person of integrity, I thought you would want to be aware, so you could adjust the Headline to match the claim. Thank you for caring for those furry friends we love so much!
There aren't a lot of soft treats suitable for older dogs that have few remaining teeth, mine is such a dog...she loves them...I looked at the soft treats found in the store, many, many of them oddly contain garlic which is listed as bad for dogs....using such treats not knowing that, mine lost a 3" patch of fur...I threw them away and switched to this treat as well as ceaser treats...her fur has grown back and all seems well...as for flavor, I gave them a 5, not because I have eaten them but again, my dog likes them lol
I was wondering about how much to feed my dog. The problem is I see things listing Giant Breeds as 75-100 pounds but my actually Giant of a dog is 165. I would like to transition him to a cooked diet but I don’t want to under or over feed him based on doing the math wrong. Do you have any charts or resources that can help me with an actual giant dog? This would hopefully include both food and vitamins.
Hello and thanks for the comment! We believe that having a diet consisting of 50% vegetables of assorted colors and types provides the necessary vitamins needed for any living being. Regarding feeding your dog raw: we completely respect your position and appreciate that you are feeding raw to your dog. Canine Journal has never taken a stance on raw diets. We only shared what the American Veterinary Medical Association’s position is on the matter. We only said that the AVMA is not ok with raw. This is not misinformation this is a fact to show that the AVMA is not behind this. That does not mean that other vets are not behind it. Wishing you and your pup a healthy winter!
I needed to help my 10 yr old, 100 lb dog lose weight. I found that he loved cooked vegetables, especially green beans, that are filling yet low in calories. So I bought the huge (1 gal) can of green beans and added a large scoop to his regular kibble when I didn’t have other cooked vegetables left over from my meals. He love sauerkraut too! I was working full time and didn’t have a lot of extra time to cook his meals from scratch.
​No Crockpot?  No problem - just make a potato beef stew with whatever pot you have around the kitchen, your dog will appreciate the effort all the same. Amanda even takes it a step further and supplements her dog food with extra dog vitamins, which is a great idea. Just make sure you talk to the Vet first so they can receive the optimal level of nutrients needed for your dog.
The easiest way is to throw everything in a large slow cooker. 5 pounds regular ground beef, 3 pounds chopped beef liver, three cups of frozen or fresh veg and/or fruit, (carrots, peas, butternut squash, broccoli, blueberry, pumpkin etc.) 4 cups parboiled rice, 8 cups of water. 5 hours on high, longer on low and its done. A weeks worth in the fridge in what it was cooked in for an 80 lb dog. (substitute liver with any other organ, or rice with oats, quinoa, egg noodles, rice noodles).
To those of us who love deviled eggs (and we are legion), there is really no occasion that could not be made better by a platter of eggs stuffed with their own whipped yolks. Maybe that’s Easter lunch, their most native habitat, or a work party where everyone — even the most keto-devout! — can fall upon that plate of little morsels. But what about breakfast? Do deviled eggs belong at breakfast? Oh yes. And I have the recipe to prove it.
However, homemade dog food isn’t risk-free either. A 2013 study by the Journal of the American Veterinary Association from a while back showed that more than 90% of homemade dog food recipes found online may be bad for your dog. The study went over 200 recipes from reputable veterinary textbooks and certified veterinary nutritionists, as well as other pet-related sources, and of the 200 recipes, 191 weren’t up to par with the Association’s standards. That’s ~96%!
One of the pleasures of cooking a ham for a large gathering, obviously outside of eating it, is that the city hams we glaze and bake for holidays are already cooked. This should take the guesswork out of cooking a ham at home, right? But because most hams are quite large and have spiral cuts and giant bones to contend with, it can be hard to tell when a ham is actually “done” cooking. Here’s everything you need to know about ham temperatures for reheating and serving.
The Pumpkin dog biscuit recipe is incomplete. It calls for cold water, but does not give you instruction on where/when to use said water. It also calls for you to reserve some of the “rice mixture” but then asks you to add the pumpkin mixture (w egg(s), even though recipe says 1 egg). How then would you reserve the mixture to which you are adding? It also says it makes 24 “balls,” but details instructions to roll out on parchment paper. Just overall very unclear.
Kelsie- My 10 yr old lab has mast cell. I met with a holistic vet after my vet wanted to keep her on steroids (which are not good). I am now cooking her food and this recipe does not give everything that’s needed and flour is not good. I also just started her on a drink for humans called NingXia Red. It’s expensive, but the holistic vet recommended it (she does not sell it either so she had nothing to gain from telling me this). Check with your vet or a holistic vet in your area on what you should be feeding. A lot of foods give off histamines which are not good for mast cell patients. Good luck!
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