I personally don’t consider 80 degrees F to be a bad temperature to walk your dog in. I live in Iowa and our summers days are often hotter than that, even in the evening around 5:30pm when I walk my dog. Like you said, I make sure to bring water with us and give her rests in the shade if need be. Overall, it’s important to know your dog’s tolerance level. For my dog, Sally, she is perfectly comfortable in those conditions. However, there are some dogs who may struggle in similar conditions.
The Pumpkin dog biscuit recipe is incomplete. It calls for cold water, but does not give you instruction on where/when to use said water. It also calls for you to reserve some of the “rice mixture” but then asks you to add the pumpkin mixture (w egg(s), even though recipe says 1 egg). How then would you reserve the mixture to which you are adding? It also says it makes 24 “balls,” but details instructions to roll out on parchment paper. Just overall very unclear.
With all the recalls and my concern over ingredients, I started cooking 2 yrs ago for my guy. The base for his dog food is quinoa with flax and chia seeds. I cook the grain, adding coconut oil and turmeric. I top this with a protein- good organic chicken, boneless pork, scrambled egg with shell included, occasionally beef – a veggie addition depends on what I have– carrot, green bean , spinach- add a tbsp of pumpkin, and plain yoghurt. All the eyestain on my little white dog has DISAPPEARED ! His energy is great, and no more itchy skin. He loves dinner!! And he seems to feel as good as he looks!
Thank you Andrea, your formula makes much more sense, and remember reading about the tests for high protein, it is pretty much the formula I use as well. For people who are just treading water, a handful of their usual kibbles while they get their formula perfected would be advisable. And wean from there when they have confidence, or just continue to add that handful…but homemade dog food, when you get it right, is the bomb! If you have it down, you will see a huge difference in your pups. Both in appearance and energy. And really so easy, make up a month at a time and freeze in pound containers. And you are also recycling all those pound containers you would otherwise throw out. It’s all good. Jill
Oven baked with love and coated in raw goodness, the first biscuit treats that truly mirror a whole prey diet! Our Raw Coated Biscuits are full of meat and organ meat for a treat as nature intended that your dog will go wild for! We start with the world’s finest ingredients. Next we gently bake with love in small batches and finally we coat every biscuit in raw goodness to make the perfect treat!
I was thinking the same thing when I read them. I’m no nutritionist, but it is my passion and I’ve been studying human and animal nutrition for a long time. I’m glad somebody pointed this out. Steve, do you have a specific recipe you would use? I thought mine was great, but my dog apparently had sediment build-up in his bladder on a recent ultrasound. The vet hopes it’s just dehydration but thinks it could be his homemade diet. He said the sediment could come from excessive protein (which seems strange because I was just recently thinking his diet may be too carb heavy). Any tips would be awesome!

my dogs eat Merrick freeze dried bits with kibble and then organic wet dog food and i change it every other day and noticed they have diarrhea so i called their vet and she said i need to feed them white rice and chicken until it gets solid again. well today it looks more solid but i know they wont go back to what i was feeding them so how can i add in the healthy beneficial foods to their diet without hurting their tummies again.
Separately, I noticed a lot of negative comments on here about the recipes. Dogs have lived with humans for thousands and thousands of years. They ate what humans ate and thrived, including grains, veggies, fruits, meats and bones. Dogs are more like scavengers and adapt to eating whatever food is available. There is a lot of misconception out there for what kind of food is best, things are usually based on whatever fad is current. Right now paleo and ketogenic diets are popular and you can see that reflected in people’s opinions for dog food. However, some of the oldest living dogs were fed vegan diets— not advocating, just saying. People have a tendency to jump on band wagons without much real evidence to support them. Then after some time, it comes out why that band wagon wasn’t so great after all. The key seems to be to get them off kibble and onto fresh healthy foods and to be balanced. Even the Canine Cancer Series, referenced in another comment, mentioned the need to add fresh veggies to dog food. They said just adding fresh veggies alone to kibble reduced a dog’s cancer risk by a significant amount.
Frittatas have long been my go-to solution anytime I need to use up the sad-looking produce, wilting herbs, and little nubs of cheese in my fridge. It’s not often I make them with a plan — until now. Inspired by my favorite cheesy dip and the warm spring weather, I came up with a frittata loaded with garlicky marinated artichoke hearts, earthy baby spinach, salty Parm, and rich sour cream. I knew it would be good, but it went above and beyond all of my expectations.

With all the recalls and my concern over ingredients, I started cooking 2 yrs ago for my guy. The base for his dog food is quinoa with flax and chia seeds. I cook the grain, adding coconut oil and turmeric. I top this with a protein- good organic chicken, boneless pork, scrambled egg with shell included, occasionally beef – a veggie addition depends on what I have– carrot, green bean , spinach- add a tbsp of pumpkin, and plain yoghurt. All the eyestain on my little white dog has DISAPPEARED ! His energy is great, and no more itchy skin. He loves dinner!! And he seems to feel as good as he looks!
There are a couple ways that you can do this recipe to make it more fun and interesting for you and your dog. You can either cook the meat and rice/lentils/quinoa up in a pot with water and add the vegetables near the end of cooking. The other option is to cook the rice/lentils/quinoa and vegetables until soft, mix everything together with the raw beef and form them into meatballs. Cook meatballs at 400 degrees for about 45 minutes, or until fully cooked.
Prevent unhealthy additives. Many brands of commercial dog treats are filled with preservatives, which help to extend their shelf life. In addition, store bought treats are often made from fillers and byproducts as opposed to natural and high quality ingredients. By creating your own treats at home, you will be able to provide your dog with a healthy snack that is not only nutritious but is also free of unhealthy additives.
I went online for advice about my dogs having a touch of the runs to be blunt and it seemed many said at first try changing to a bland diet of rice and chicken then I went looking for recipes for homemade dog food and found myself here and can honestly say I will never buy dog food from the store again and sure for just sake of a little time my dogs eat healthier and have a noticeable change in just one week and I reckon cost less to feed which I would pay more anyway if I thought it was good for them.
Thankfully, Sage doesn’t have any special allergies or dietary needs, so there’s really no reason for me to make her homemade dog treats other than the fact that I love her something fierce and needed a break from cookies for a minute. But conveniently, this homemade dog treats recipe makes a TON and we know lots of other neighbor-ly dogs who can and will appreciate a little gift bag of soft-baked, peanut butter and bacon glazed homemade dog treats.

I recently started making my dogs’ food, started as basically just a way of using up excess veggies, and lunch meat in lieu of throwing it away. Just run them– chicken, ham, beef, turkey lunch meat, along with my salad fixings–kale, spinach, cabbage, tomatoes– and the vegetables I mixed in with their wet food every night. Corn, broccoli, lima beans, carrots. Ran everything through the chopper..keep the veggies in one container, the meat in the other. For the first time in years, they eat every bite of their food. And added benefit? It’s WAY cheaper than the $9 a night (I have three big dogs) canned food I’ve been feeding them.
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