To be fair, humans do not suckle a cow either but we still eat dairy. 🙂 We have found sources online that say it’s ok to give a dog dairy as long as they’re not lactose intolerant, the same goes for grain. Each dog is unique so it’s important to know what is ok for your dog’s digestive system and to talk to your vet if you have any questions. I know many dogs who have eaten dairy and grain and have been completely fine.
There are a couple ways that you can do this recipe to make it more fun and interesting for you and your dog. You can either cook the meat and rice/lentils/quinoa up in a pot with water and add the vegetables near the end of cooking. The other option is to cook the rice/lentils/quinoa and vegetables until soft, mix everything together with the raw beef and form them into meatballs. Cook meatballs at 400 degrees for about 45 minutes, or until fully cooked.
Cleaning the Cutters - You want to clean your dog cookie cutters as soon as your dog biscuits are in the oven. Using warm water and mild soap is usually all you'll need. Once they are washed, place them on a clean baking sheet and pop them into the oven for a couple minutes. This will help them to dry completely and avoid rust. Once they are cooled, they can be stored.
Separately, I noticed a lot of negative comments on here about the recipes. Dogs have lived with humans for thousands and thousands of years. They ate what humans ate and thrived, including grains, veggies, fruits, meats and bones. Dogs are more like scavengers and adapt to eating whatever food is available. There is a lot of misconception out there for what kind of food is best, things are usually based on whatever fad is current. Right now paleo and ketogenic diets are popular and you can see that reflected in people’s opinions for dog food. However, some of the oldest living dogs were fed vegan diets— not advocating, just saying. People have a tendency to jump on band wagons without much real evidence to support them. Then after some time, it comes out why that band wagon wasn’t so great after all. The key seems to be to get them off kibble and onto fresh healthy foods and to be balanced. Even the Canine Cancer Series, referenced in another comment, mentioned the need to add fresh veggies to dog food. They said just adding fresh veggies alone to kibble reduced a dog’s cancer risk by a significant amount.

Hi there, I made the Crock pot Beef and Rice meal and I was wondering how many cups per day should I be feeding my basset hound? I tried home cooked dog food because she refuses to eat store bought dog food. We would just leave the bowl filled normally. I know bassets have an issue with obesity so I don’t want to start feeding her too much. She’s a year old and weighs 40 pounds currently. How much should she be eating daily? Thank you!
This post totally cracked me up! Mainly because I have been thinking of making little pup treats for 2 weeks now. I’ve been hooked on Diane’s Gingie cookies (see OvenHug for the best gingie recipe eh=vah) and making them non-stop. Our finicky little chihuahua mix loves sharing bites with me. I want to make a gluten free version of my gingies so that our senior pup, Oscar can also join us – he has sensitive tummy issues. I just need to find a bone shaped cookie cutter and we’re in business. Thanks for the laughs. Your pup cookies look amazin’! Thanks for sharing. xo

I have 3 dogs, a border collie, poodle mix and a daschund. They get along very well and we take them daily for at least an hour and 1/2 walk. Lately though, the two smaller ones refuse to eat at their normal feeding time. Dennis, the collie, happily eats, but Teddy and Murdog shiver and hide. I work from home and make their gravy from fresh veg. We spend plenty time together and they are loved and very well taken care of. Why have the little ones behaviour changed so drastically in such a short time?
Also to go along with my previous message, I add the supplements I mentioned to each serving. Dr. Goodpet has been recommended as a good source of some of the ingredients, vitamins and digestive enzymes, I add Kal Bone Meal, and The Missing Link superfood supplement. As I said earlier, do your own research to find the proper mix of real food for your pet.
Interesting, my vet didn’t recommend Hill’s to us but I believe you. Now understanding the point made, I agree with you Twyla. If a dog food isn’t working for your dog and you’ve introduced it to them slowly then changing food is a good idea. As you said, homemade food is a good option as well as organic. In the end, each dog is different so you’ll need to play around with it until you find a healthy balance for your dog. Thanks for the comment and input Twyla!
Feeding your dog a DIY homemade dog food is something that more and more dog owners are doing these days. It’s understandable as many of us are becoming aware of the shady manufacturing practices in the pet food industry, filler ingredients, fake “Made in USA” labels and other things harmful to our pets. Using homemade dog food recipes is a way to let your pooch enjoy the finer things in life, in particular high-quality and delicious meat.
When preparing DIY homemade dog food, it's likely you'll be making large quantities of it. After all, you don’t want to cook it every day. However, with the larger quantities come some potential storage problems. And not storing your pet's food properly in a special dog food storage container or fridge, not freezing when needed, is about as dangerous as not storing your own food in an adequate way.

Soft & chewy Buddy Biscuits are palatable with no crunch. An excellent choice for all dogs, especially older dogs or smaller dogs who prefer a softer treat. Along with indulging your pup, Buddy Soft & Chewy treats are also perfect for training, with a low calorie count and chock full of flavor to keep your dog motivated. Buddy Biscuits are also oven baked in the USA with only quality, recognizable ingredients. Healthy dog treats made with quality ingredients and natural peanut butter. Palatable, chewy dog treats perfect for older dogs. Baked in USA only. Contain no added corn, soy, fillers,artificial colors, flavors and artificial preservatives


How about vitamins & minerals, i cant find it now but i seen one recipe taht said you can not feed a home made diet without feeding them the vitamins, and is there specific ones that i should look for and is that placed in their food when you serve it, or when you cook it? And what is the best book to help decide raw or cooked, and recipes for both, along with the vitamins..
Also, the things you said about a raw diet is 100% false. The AVMA may not be behind it but there are many vets that advocate a raw diet. I have been feeding my dog a PMR (prey model raw) diet for a year and just started my 7 month old pup on it and they’ve never been healthier. If you’re clean and sanitary in your meat handling and clean up, like you would be if it were for your own consumption, it’s completely safe.
We add 1 tsp Nupro Silver supplement at each of 2 meals we feed daily and a dash of hot water to mix it into a gravy. This gives them all vitamins, minerals, probiotics, amino acids, digestive support and joint support they need and reduces the tedious task of have to greatly vary their diet to account for those things. In the end, I feel it is also more cost effective. The dogs love it!

Hi I currently have a 14 year old Kelpie x Border Collie. She is Currently 35kg but she needs to be 28kg for her size. she currently has bad arthritis and her weight is affecting her and causing more pain and less movement and it’s hard to watch. Iv’e tried all shop bought diets but there full of grains and because shes in pain she moves as little as possible and the weight remains. I want to try making it myself but i’m not sure how much to feed her, any help would be appreciated. Thank you

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Welcome to Next Week’s Meal Plan! I want to help you find inspiration and ease some of the pain points that come with getting dinner on the table night after night, whether you’re cooking for one or a family of eight. That’s why, as promised, this series is shifting — every week I’ll be answering reader requests and sharing meal plans that you want to see.It’s not too late! What type of meal plans would you like to see?
When your pooch refuses to eat commercial dog food, be it dry or canned, then sooner or later you might be faced with a problem: you won't have any prepared DIY homemade dog food meals on hand (due to lack of time or whatnot) at home and your canine may be refusing to eat anything else. Fortunately, this is relatively easy to avoid by feeding your dog some commercial dog food from time to time from an early age.
Welcome to Next Week’s Meal Plan! I want to help you find inspiration and ease some of the pain points that come with getting dinner on the table night after night, whether you’re cooking for one or a family of eight. That’s why, as promised, this series is shifting — every week I’ll be answering reader requests and sharing meal plans that you want to see.It’s not too late! What type of meal plans would you like to see?
If your fur baby has a sweet tooth he will love these chews, and oatmeal adds protein and is good for digestion. To make these chewy treats, puree 1/4 C. diced peaches, 1 tbsp. canola oil, 1 tbsp. molasses, 1/4 tsp. vanilla and 1/8 C. water. Combine the puree with 2 C. rolled oats, 1/2 C. water, 1 C. flour and 1 tsp. cinnamon. Scoop spoon-sized dollops on to a lightly greased baking sheet, press them flat with the back of the spoon, and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes. These chewy cookie treats can be stored for two weeks in the refrigerator or six months in the freezer.
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