I started cooking for my three German Shepherds about 6 months ago, after a lot of frustration with diarrhea, allergies and other issues. Within a few days the diarrhea ended, then a few weeks later I noticed they were shedding less and not scratching anymore. One of my dogs had allergies so bad she needed injections every 8 weeks or she’d scratch her ears raw. Now she no longer needs the shots. They’re all pooping a small fraction of what they used to, so that means everything they’re eating is being used. Their coats are shiny and even strangers have commented on how healthy they look. I will never go back to commercial dog food. And they all LOVE the food!!! Now I need to add some homemade kibble to their diet.
It isn’t uncommon for a dog owner to decide to make homemade dog food. Whether you just want to save money or you want to make sure that you know what type of ingredients are going into your dog’s meals, it isn’t that difficult to do. The most important thing is to make sure they get foods that contain protein, calcium and other nutrients they need for energy.
As I eat my weight in sweet strawberries this time of year, the subject of what to do with the abundance of spring and summer fruit comes to mind. I am usually more than content with enjoying berries and stone fruit as-is, but when I’ve gone a little overboard at the farmers market, jam is one of the many things I consider making. Or is it jelly? The two terms for fruit spread have always confused me a bit. Luckily, there’s an easy way to distinguish between the two.
Separately, I noticed a lot of negative comments on here about the recipes. Dogs have lived with humans for thousands and thousands of years. They ate what humans ate and thrived, including grains, veggies, fruits, meats and bones. Dogs are more like scavengers and adapt to eating whatever food is available. There is a lot of misconception out there for what kind of food is best, things are usually based on whatever fad is current. Right now paleo and ketogenic diets are popular and you can see that reflected in people’s opinions for dog food. However, some of the oldest living dogs were fed vegan diets— not advocating, just saying. People have a tendency to jump on band wagons without much real evidence to support them. Then after some time, it comes out why that band wagon wasn’t so great after all. The key seems to be to get them off kibble and onto fresh healthy foods and to be balanced. Even the Canine Cancer Series, referenced in another comment, mentioned the need to add fresh veggies to dog food. They said just adding fresh veggies alone to kibble reduced a dog’s cancer risk by a significant amount.
My daughter volunteers at a dog rescue and we want to make several different batches and bring them to share in celebrating her birthday in a couple months. I LOVE the variety of recipes and especially ones for those dogs with grain allergies or that are diabetic! My question is, will the treats still be good if we make ahead of time and freeze them until closer to the big day? Sadly, I’m not much of a cook so I am not familiar with what freezes well and what wouldn’t.
Hi I currently have a 14 year old Kelpie x Border Collie. She is Currently 35kg but she needs to be 28kg for her size. she currently has bad arthritis and her weight is affecting her and causing more pain and less movement and it’s hard to watch. Iv’e tried all shop bought diets but there full of grains and because shes in pain she moves as little as possible and the weight remains. I want to try making it myself but i’m not sure how much to feed her, any help would be appreciated. Thank you
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I have been cooking for my Boston Terrier for about 4 months now. She kept throwing up every dog food I bought, and it wasn’t cheap food either. I boil whole chicken, and then the rice,buy frozen vegetables, green beans, peas, carrots, spinach, and want to check on adding something else because she is still shedding so bad and can’t figure out why. I give her a multivitamin from GNC for dogs and wondered if she needs something else. When I take her to the vet I’m going to have her checked because she still chokes and throws up but not like with the dog food. She had some throat problems when she was a puppy, he said was tonsillitis, but I’m thinking she has something wrong with her soft palate or stomach. At least making her food is better than having her throw up every day. I do use coconut oil in the recipe. So sweet potatoes or potatoes would be good to add to? I cook all mine up in a big pot and put in quart freezer bags and it lasts a month. I’ve even started giving my bully about 1 cup w/his dry food and he’s got skin problems he’s doing better. Is there something I can use for her hair?
Lifting the Cut Outs - Once you have cut out as many dog biscuits as you can, it's time to transfer the cookies to the baking sheet. Start by pulling away the excess dough from around the cut outs. Place the unused dough back into your bowl to be rolled out. Gently lift the cookie away from the parchment paper or flour covered surface with a metal or thin spatula.
Hello! I am BRAND new to this and just want to make sure I don’t miss any nutrients my babies need!! I have 2 mini dachshunds and a foster chihuaha, are there any recipes specific for tiny babies? Also, I read something about determining how much of what goes in by their weight. Anyone know HOW to do that/what the equation for that is (Example:weight-10lbs:__×10÷__=
Frittatas have long been my go-to solution anytime I need to use up the sad-looking produce, wilting herbs, and little nubs of cheese in my fridge. It’s not often I make them with a plan — until now. Inspired by my favorite cheesy dip and the warm spring weather, I came up with a frittata loaded with garlicky marinated artichoke hearts, earthy baby spinach, salty Parm, and rich sour cream. I knew it would be good, but it went above and beyond all of my expectations.

Also, keep in mind that each of these best homemade dog food recipes requires additional supplements such as zinc, choline, vitamin D and E, copper, calcium or others, depending on your dog's nutritional needs. The reason I haven’t listed them is that the correct dosages depends on the age, breed, size and pre-existing health conditions of your dog – you really must consult with a vet or canine nutritionist about these things.


​No Crockpot?  No problem - just make a potato beef stew with whatever pot you have around the kitchen, your dog will appreciate the effort all the same. Amanda even takes it a step further and supplements her dog food with extra dog vitamins, which is a great idea. Just make sure you talk to the Vet first so they can receive the optimal level of nutrients needed for your dog.
Also, keep in mind that each of these best homemade dog food recipes requires additional supplements such as zinc, choline, vitamin D and E, copper, calcium or others, depending on your dog's nutritional needs. The reason I haven’t listed them is that the correct dosages depends on the age, breed, size and pre-existing health conditions of your dog – you really must consult with a vet or canine nutritionist about these things.
I didn’t realize you could make dog treats with only 2 ingredients, That’s awesome! All of the recipes sound great. I read some of the other posts, and I’m borrowing one of the ideas. My daughter is in a Girl Scout troop and her troop’s project is to volunteer at a shelter. I will check with the shelter and see if we can bring homemade treats. Thanks for all of the ideas!
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