Many homemade dog food recipes don’t have a full range of vitamins and minerals. Unless you want to get very into adding supplements and so on to make sure your homemade is nutritionally balanced, I’d feed a mix of homemade and high quality kibble – kibble is already fortified with the necessary vitamins and minerals. I’d also double check the recommended protein/carb/fat balance for a puppy – what puppies need and what adult dogs need aren’t the same, so you might need to tweak the homemade food recipes to add or subtract rice and other carb sources to make the ratios right for a puppy. (This is particularly important for larger breed dogs as they need the right balance for joint and bone development for long term health.)
Originally from Chicago, Nicole Janiga joined the Chewy team as a marketing intern in January 2017. Since then, Nicole has continued writing and photographing for Chewy as a Content Collaborator while completing her education at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business. She is majoring in both marketing and corporate innovation, before returning to Chewy as a Marketing Analyst. In her free time, Nicole enjoys traveling, riding her horse or snuggling up with her Pug, @zoetheloaf, and Terrier, Cozmo. 
Also, the things you said about a raw diet is 100% false. The AVMA may not be behind it but there are many vets that advocate a raw diet. I have been feeding my dog a PMR (prey model raw) diet for a year and just started my 7 month old pup on it and they’ve never been healthier. If you’re clean and sanitary in your meat handling and clean up, like you would be if it were for your own consumption, it’s completely safe.
Homemade dog food recipes are one of the more controversial topics among pet owners and veterinarians. Depending on who you ask, you may hear that homemade dog food is a waste of time and no more nutritionally beneficial than commercial diets or that the best homemade dog food recipes can have an extremely positive effect on your dog's health and well-being.
There are a couple ways that you can do this recipe to make it more fun and interesting for you and your dog. You can either cook the meat and rice/lentils/quinoa up in a pot with water and add the vegetables near the end of cooking. The other option is to cook the rice/lentils/quinoa and vegetables until soft, mix everything together with the raw beef and form them into meatballs. Cook meatballs at 400 degrees for about 45 minutes, or until fully cooked.
I was thinking the same thing when I read them. I’m no nutritionist, but it is my passion and I’ve been studying human and animal nutrition for a long time. I’m glad somebody pointed this out. Steve, do you have a specific recipe you would use? I thought mine was great, but my dog apparently had sediment build-up in his bladder on a recent ultrasound. The vet hopes it’s just dehydration but thinks it could be his homemade diet. He said the sediment could come from excessive protein (which seems strange because I was just recently thinking his diet may be too carb heavy). Any tips would be awesome!

From fetching his favorite ball to successfully sitting on command, your dog deserves delicious and healthy dog treats. In addition to your verbal praise and affection, there's nothing your dog enjoys more than some mouth-watering rawhide bones or crunchy training treats. Having a natural inclination to please, dogs love to be praised, which is why it's important that they be rewarded with healthy dog biscuits. Healthy dog treats can also add variety to your dog's diet. And because peanut butter dog treats are a fan favorite, they are often available in varieties that provide additional nutritional support under the cloak of their delicious flavor. There are treats enriched with glucosamine to promote better hip and joint health, wheat-grass for better digestion, and more. For dogs with allergies, there are hypoallergenic organic dog treats that are wheat, gluten and corn-free, and even low-calorie treats for less active dogs.
We add 1 tsp Nupro Silver supplement at each of 2 meals we feed daily and a dash of hot water to mix it into a gravy. This gives them all vitamins, minerals, probiotics, amino acids, digestive support and joint support they need and reduces the tedious task of have to greatly vary their diet to account for those things. In the end, I feel it is also more cost effective. The dogs love it!

One of the pleasures of cooking a ham for a large gathering, obviously outside of eating it, is that the city hams we glaze and bake for holidays are already cooked. This should take the guesswork out of cooking a ham at home, right? But because most hams are quite large and have spiral cuts and giant bones to contend with, it can be hard to tell when a ham is actually “done” cooking. Here’s everything you need to know about ham temperatures for reheating and serving.
As I eat my weight in sweet strawberries this time of year, the subject of what to do with the abundance of spring and summer fruit comes to mind. I am usually more than content with enjoying berries and stone fruit as-is, but when I’ve gone a little overboard at the farmers market, jam is one of the many things I consider making. Or is it jelly? The two terms for fruit spread have always confused me a bit. Luckily, there’s an easy way to distinguish between the two.
I’ve been feeding my doggies my own recipe for dog food for the last few years and they all are doing so much better! (Investing in an Instant Pot is a life and time saver!) My 13 year old schnoodle got so much more pep back in his step after getting put on this diet. He still prances about. They have less intestinal issues and it saved me money. I’ll never go back. I make it daily and keep containers well stocked to miss some days of making if needed.
Thanks, and the reason for the discrepancy is because I’ve added a couple more recipes to this list recently. I did update the title and heading and in the body of the article itself, but I haven’t updated all the images yet (one of them says 22, and the one at the top still says 23). Thanks for the reminder, it’s something I’ve been meaning to get around to.
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Meet the Buddy Biscuits Family Simple, Crunchy Goodness - Born in 1999, I soon set the standard for oven baked dog treats. With simple ingredients, mouth-watering flavor and a satisfying crunch, I am still a favorite of dogs near and far. Soft & delicious, naturally! The soft texture of these mouth-watering treats makes them perfect for our four-legged friends who prefer a soft treat. We packed them with flavor and simple ingredients, so you’ll love them as much as your dog does. Function meets Delicious - Buddy Boosters offer a boost of glucosamine and chondroitin in every piece and Buddy Trainers are the perfect size for training your pup. These low calorie chews are oven baked and have a delicious soft texture. Naturally Purrr-fect Cat Treats! Our cat treats are made from the quality ingredients you want for your cat, like real meat and wholesome vegetables, with no grains or artificial flavors. SNUGGLEOFFOLOUS - So amazing that we had to create a new word to describe how soft, fluffy, snuggly, and wonderful smelling your dog will be after using our grooming products.
When preparing homemade dog treats, make sure you take into account any allergies that your pet has to specific ingredients. You will want to avoid adding any ingredient that you know that your pet has reacted poorly to in the past. If you are experimenting with new flavors, feed the treat to your dog in a small amount to see how he reacts to it before distributing an entire treat. Store your homemade dog treats in an airtight container and place them in the freezer. Allow the treat to thaw for 10 – 20 minutes prior to serving to your dog. Treats can last for up to 6 months in the freezer.

I cook I large sweet potato, about a quart of fresh turnip greens in 3 1/2 quarts of water which has 1 tablespoon of salt in it. When the water barely starts to boil I sprinkle a mixture of long grain white rice and brown rice in while stirring. Some times I add a pint of frozen mixed vegetables (with Lima beans). I set the stove as low as it will go and stir occasionally to be sure it is not sticking. You will think it is too much water but it will all be absorbed. I cook a large pack of chicken thighs in the oven at 280 degrees for about an hour and a half about every 4 days. I use 2 or 3 a day. When the other stuff is done I cut the 2 or 3 thighs up with the scissors and add some of the liquid from the cooking of the chicken. I dip up 2 and 1/2 cups of the mixture for each large dog 2 times a day. One time a day I crush one multiple vitamin and 2 glucosamine regular human vitamins and add to each big dog serving. Both times a day I add 1 tablespoon of dry milk. To each serving. Sometimes I use ground beef. And sometimes I add chicken livers.
“Prescription diets” like Hills Science Diet and Royal Canine are pretty much a scam. I used to feed it to my dogs who over the years often developed disease such as cancer and other ailments. The state of Ca has sued these companies for false advertising and collusion with certain vet chains where the vets get kick backs for “prescribing” these brands for your sick pets. When examining the ingredients, youll see they can include inferior protien and starch sourses such as corn, and meat byproducts. Plus, as this article explained, kibble itself is a nutritionally compromised food (due to the production method of high heat and extrusion). Sure, its convenient and less work for the human, but over time, will likely be damaging to a dog’s (or cats) organs. Google yourself to research… if you dont know where to start, try Dr Karen Becker, a holistic and traditional vet who provides excellent information and advice on pet food and ailments, weight controll, and prevention. I have been very happy feeding a commercial (Honest Kitchen) nutritionally ballanced dehydrated raw food mixture (add water) with supplimental fresh foods. These recipes sound great too!
Originally from Chicago, Nicole Janiga joined the Chewy team as a marketing intern in January 2017. Since then, Nicole has continued writing and photographing for Chewy as a Content Collaborator while completing her education at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business. She is majoring in both marketing and corporate innovation, before returning to Chewy as a Marketing Analyst. In her free time, Nicole enjoys traveling, riding her horse or snuggling up with her Pug, @zoetheloaf, and Terrier, Cozmo. 
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