The easiest way is to throw everything in a large slow cooker. 5 pounds regular ground beef, 3 pounds chopped beef liver, three cups of frozen or fresh veg and/or fruit, (carrots, peas, butternut squash, broccoli, blueberry, pumpkin etc.) 4 cups parboiled rice, 8 cups of water. 5 hours on high, longer on low and its done. A weeks worth in the fridge in what it was cooked in for an 80 lb dog. (substitute liver with any other organ, or rice with oats, quinoa, egg noodles, rice noodles).

I have always cooked for my dogs but, they also get a premium kibble with their home cooked foods. This way, I know they get the nutrition they needs. I supplement with fresh fruits and veggies everyday as well. They’re all extremely healthy with zero issues. Dogs should still have some kibble, it is nutritionally complete, good for their teeth. For my senior, I soften his. I wouldn’t and, have never relied on my homemade foods as a sole source of their nutrition. Just slow cook whatever they can eat, they’ll love you for it 🙂
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I’m assuming you are changing over to a homemade diet because you have health concerns related to commercially produced dog food. Please research the contents of ALL commercial foods. You will be appalled. It ranges in offensiveness from low quality, to poisonous and downright carcinogenic. Proteins are frequently comprised of beaks, feathers, and high temperature steamed bonemeal. The most common source of “animal protein” is actually a meal that is produced using euthanized, ill farm and COMPANION animals…..as well as the medications that were in their systems when they were eventually determined to be terminal. There are a multitude of articles online with which you can educate yourself about the heinous nature of commercial dog food (yes, even the “premium” foods) so I guess the short answer is…..NO, if you care about what your dog is eating, don’t feed anything that you purchase human grade ingredients and prepare yourself! Btw, organic is best if you can afford it. The chemicals in human food are just as detrimental to your dog as they are for you, although having a shorter lifespan, they obviously won’t suffer some of the cumulative affects that humans do.


Also, please note that because of volume , we are unable to respond to individual comments, although we do watch them in order to learn what issues and questions are most common so that we can produce content that fulfills your needs. You are welcome to share your own dog tips and behavior solutions among yourselves, however Thank you for reading our articles and sharing your thoughts with the pack!
There are a couple ways that you can do this recipe to make it more fun and interesting for you and your dog. You can either cook the meat and rice/lentils/quinoa up in a pot with water and add the vegetables near the end of cooking. The other option is to cook the rice/lentils/quinoa and vegetables until soft, mix everything together with the raw beef and form them into meatballs. Cook meatballs at 400 degrees for about 45 minutes, or until fully cooked.
I’ve been making my own dog food for over a year now. I started when one of my pups got sick and I had to make him a bland diet of chicken and rice. They love the “human food” and I feel good knowing they are getting the healthiest diet possible. I do add the supplement Azestfor to the food to make sure they are getting all their nutrients. If you are questioning if your dog is getting enough supplements I would definitely recommend using it. 🙂
​This is a different type of recipe, in fact there's no real recipe here at all. This is more instruction on how to construct your own recipe using optimal ingredients for a properly nutrtionally balanced meal. They have sources several scientific studies and even vet endorsed sample diets in order to give you a better idea of what's suitable for your dog - a highly recommend you give this a read.

Deviled eggs are one of the most universally loved apps and snacks. Put a plate down at any holiday get-together or gathering and it’s all but guaranteed they’ll be gobbled up in no time. I’m a purist at heart who believes you can never go wrong with the classic creamy, mustard-spiked filling, although there’s a nearly endless variety of ways to dress up and reinvent these two-bite snacks. Here are 10 of our favorite deviled recipe ideas to consider.
Many homemade dog food recipes don’t have a full range of vitamins and minerals. Unless you want to get very into adding supplements and so on to make sure your homemade is nutritionally balanced, I’d feed a mix of homemade and high quality kibble – kibble is already fortified with the necessary vitamins and minerals. I’d also double check the recommended protein/carb/fat balance for a puppy – what puppies need and what adult dogs need aren’t the same, so you might need to tweak the homemade food recipes to add or subtract rice and other carb sources to make the ratios right for a puppy. (This is particularly important for larger breed dogs as they need the right balance for joint and bone development for long term health.)
Frittatas have long been my go-to solution anytime I need to use up the sad-looking produce, wilting herbs, and little nubs of cheese in my fridge. It’s not often I make them with a plan — until now. Inspired by my favorite cheesy dip and the warm spring weather, I came up with a frittata loaded with garlicky marinated artichoke hearts, earthy baby spinach, salty Parm, and rich sour cream. I knew it would be good, but it went above and beyond all of my expectations.
​No Crockpot?  No problem - just make a potato beef stew with whatever pot you have around the kitchen, your dog will appreciate the effort all the same. Amanda even takes it a step further and supplements her dog food with extra dog vitamins, which is a great idea. Just make sure you talk to the Vet first so they can receive the optimal level of nutrients needed for your dog.
The point of homemade dog treats is to stay away from preservatives, chemicals, dyes and all the other nonsense. Be smart. Do extensive research on the ingredients you wish to use and the alternative to each of them. Even if you think your dog has a ‘tolerance’ for milk, you should use it regardless unless you 100% know of any additives. In that case I just take milk right out of the equation. Theres no need for it anyway.
I don’t feel grains or occasionally having certain kinds of fermented dairy are necessarily that bad. They have been in human diets, and therefore dog diets, for thousands of years without harm. I think goat dairy is supposed to be more digestible for dogs and humans if someone is insistent on that kind of a product. But, for whatever reason you want to choose, there are digestive issues coming out in our day to these products that have not existed before and so some care isn’t necessarily unwarranted. Balance is always key.
“Prescription diets” like Hills Science Diet and Royal Canine are pretty much a scam. I used to feed it to my dogs who over the years often developed disease such as cancer and other ailments. The state of Ca has sued these companies for false advertising and collusion with certain vet chains where the vets get kick backs for “prescribing” these brands for your sick pets. When examining the ingredients, youll see they can include inferior protien and starch sourses such as corn, and meat byproducts. Plus, as this article explained, kibble itself is a nutritionally compromised food (due to the production method of high heat and extrusion). Sure, its convenient and less work for the human, but over time, will likely be damaging to a dog’s (or cats) organs. Google yourself to research… if you dont know where to start, try Dr Karen Becker, a holistic and traditional vet who provides excellent information and advice on pet food and ailments, weight controll, and prevention. I have been very happy feeding a commercial (Honest Kitchen) nutritionally ballanced dehydrated raw food mixture (add water) with supplimental fresh foods. These recipes sound great too!

“Prescription diets” like Hills Science Diet and Royal Canine are pretty much a scam. I used to feed it to my dogs who over the years often developed disease such as cancer and other ailments. The state of Ca has sued these companies for false advertising and collusion with certain vet chains where the vets get kick backs for “prescribing” these brands for your sick pets. When examining the ingredients, youll see they can include inferior protien and starch sourses such as corn, and meat byproducts. Plus, as this article explained, kibble itself is a nutritionally compromised food (due to the production method of high heat and extrusion). Sure, its convenient and less work for the human, but over time, will likely be damaging to a dog’s (or cats) organs. Google yourself to research… if you dont know where to start, try Dr Karen Becker, a holistic and traditional vet who provides excellent information and advice on pet food and ailments, weight controll, and prevention. I have been very happy feeding a commercial (Honest Kitchen) nutritionally ballanced dehydrated raw food mixture (add water) with supplimental fresh foods. These recipes sound great too!


I’ve been making my own dog food for over a year now. I started when one of my pups got sick and I had to make him a bland diet of chicken and rice. They love the “human food” and I feel good knowing they are getting the healthiest diet possible. I do add the supplement Azestfor to the food to make sure they are getting all their nutrients. If you are questioning if your dog is getting enough supplements I would definitely recommend using it. 🙂
I cook for our dogs. We have a 13 year old standard poodle, a yellow lab who is 14 and 2 toy rat terriers. The poodle was seriously sick about a month ago. We did not get a specific diagnosis but he had fever of 107 he did not perk his ears, wag his tail, his rear legs could barely hold him up to pee. He had to be carried out and back in. The only thing he would eat was baked chicken thighs. Now he is back to normal and the lab is sick. Today she was able to get up without assistance one time and twice she was able to get up the 4 steps to the porch. There has been about 2 weeks that she could not get up without assistance She has not had the high fever and both have an occasional huffy cough.
All of the above dog food recipes will be deficient in many essential nutrients. There is no significant source of calcium or adequate sources of micronutrients such as B vitamins, vitamin D, etc. In addition to lacking calcium, the calcium:phosphorus ratio is an important consideration. Please consult your veterinarian before feeding any home diet. These are not adequate!!
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