I went online for advice about my dogs having a touch of the runs to be blunt and it seemed many said at first try changing to a bland diet of rice and chicken then I went looking for recipes for homemade dog food and found myself here and can honestly say I will never buy dog food from the store again and sure for just sake of a little time my dogs eat healthier and have a noticeable change in just one week and I reckon cost less to feed which I would pay more anyway if I thought it was good for them.
We add 1 tsp Nupro Silver supplement at each of 2 meals we feed daily and a dash of hot water to mix it into a gravy. This gives them all vitamins, minerals, probiotics, amino acids, digestive support and joint support they need and reduces the tedious task of have to greatly vary their diet to account for those things. In the end, I feel it is also more cost effective. The dogs love it!

One of my recipes is very similar to this one. I have six different recipes because they get tired of the same thing plus, they need different vitamins just like we do. What I make depends on what’s on sale but I do try to feed them fish high in omega 3’s at least twice to three times a month. I also switch out the veggies, too. It’s so much cheaper! I made two weeks worth of food for my two small dogs and the whole batch only cost 11 dollars. I found chicken liver on sale for 75 cents a carton, so I bought all they had! Such little effort to provide my dogs with food that they love and is so good for them. Why wouldn’t you do it for them?
I recently started making my dogs’ food, started as basically just a way of using up excess veggies, and lunch meat in lieu of throwing it away. Just run them– chicken, ham, beef, turkey lunch meat, along with my salad fixings–kale, spinach, cabbage, tomatoes– and the vegetables I mixed in with their wet food every night. Corn, broccoli, lima beans, carrots. Ran everything through the chopper..keep the veggies in one container, the meat in the other. For the first time in years, they eat every bite of their food. And added benefit? It’s WAY cheaper than the $9 a night (I have three big dogs) canned food I’ve been feeding them.
I’ve only been making my dog his food for a couple of months. In all the research I’ve done from Holistic Vets and other knowledgeable people I agree with the person who said these recipes are lacking in nutritional value for your pet. I learned that dogs have a short digestive tract so brown rice is not good for them, it will go right through them without being digested. If you want to feed your dog grains, ( I don’t) white rice is at least digestible. Bone meal should be added if your going to feed your dog any meat. Dogs in the wild would eat the flesh of pray also some of the bones. Feeding your pet veggies and fruits is good if you add canine digestive enzymes to the food. Apparently this will help to break down the veggies and make them digestible actually adding nutritional value. It’s a must to add some other nutrients like a superfood supplement containing ground flax seed, dried kelp,lecithin, the B vitamins, omega 3 and 6 fatty acids and so many other needed ingredients. Adding prebiotics and probiotics is necessary also.
Separately, I noticed a lot of negative comments on here about the recipes. Dogs have lived with humans for thousands and thousands of years. They ate what humans ate and thrived, including grains, veggies, fruits, meats and bones. Dogs are more like scavengers and adapt to eating whatever food is available. There is a lot of misconception out there for what kind of food is best, things are usually based on whatever fad is current. Right now paleo and ketogenic diets are popular and you can see that reflected in people’s opinions for dog food. However, some of the oldest living dogs were fed vegan diets— not advocating, just saying. People have a tendency to jump on band wagons without much real evidence to support them. Then after some time, it comes out why that band wagon wasn’t so great after all. The key seems to be to get them off kibble and onto fresh healthy foods and to be balanced. Even the Canine Cancer Series, referenced in another comment, mentioned the need to add fresh veggies to dog food. They said just adding fresh veggies alone to kibble reduced a dog’s cancer risk by a significant amount.

As I eat my weight in sweet strawberries this time of year, the subject of what to do with the abundance of spring and summer fruit comes to mind. I am usually more than content with enjoying berries and stone fruit as-is, but when I’ve gone a little overboard at the farmers market, jam is one of the many things I consider making. Or is it jelly? The two terms for fruit spread have always confused me a bit. Luckily, there’s an easy way to distinguish between the two.


I have always cooked for my dogs but, they also get a premium kibble with their home cooked foods. This way, I know they get the nutrition they needs. I supplement with fresh fruits and veggies everyday as well. They’re all extremely healthy with zero issues. Dogs should still have some kibble, it is nutritionally complete, good for their teeth. For my senior, I soften his. I wouldn’t and, have never relied on my homemade foods as a sole source of their nutrition. Just slow cook whatever they can eat, they’ll love you for it 🙂
Hi Matt, Thanks for your question. You can make sure your dog gets calcium and fatty acids by sprinkling a powdered supplement or drops to your dog’s meals. There are many products on the market. Because the serving size varies widely based on your dog’s weight and other factors, we urge you to consult your vet for the best recommendations for your pup.
There aren't a lot of soft treats suitable for older dogs that have few remaining teeth, mine is such a dog...she loves them...I looked at the soft treats found in the store, many, many of them oddly contain garlic which is listed as bad for dogs....using such treats not knowing that, mine lost a 3" patch of fur...I threw them away and switched to this treat as well as ceaser treats...her fur has grown back and all seems well...as for flavor, I gave them a 5, not because I have eaten them but again, my dog likes them lol
The safety and effectiveness of a raw food diet is still a point of contention among veterinary professionals. Walkerville Vet recommends the best of both worlds. This recipe is based on the raw food diet of wolves, your dog's natural ancestors. however, it also takes into account the dietary changes in domesticated dogs. It has raw meat as well as cooked carbohydrates and vegetables.
Soft & chewy Buddy Biscuits are palatable with no crunch. An excellent choice for all dogs, especially older dogs or smaller dogs who prefer a softer treat. Along with indulging your pup, Buddy Soft & Chewy treats are also perfect for training, with a low calorie count and chock full of flavor to keep your dog motivated. Buddy Biscuits are also oven baked in the USA with only quality, recognizable ingredients. Healthy dog treats made with quality ingredients and natural peanut butter. Palatable, chewy dog treats perfect for older dogs. Baked in USA only. Contain no added corn, soy, fillers,artificial colors, flavors and artificial preservatives
Also, please note that because of volume , we are unable to respond to individual comments, although we do watch them in order to learn what issues and questions are most common so that we can produce content that fulfills your needs. You are welcome to share your own dog tips and behavior solutions among yourselves, however Thank you for reading our articles and sharing your thoughts with the pack!
Christi is the baker, cook, blogger, food photographer, recipe developer and sprinkle lover behind Love From The Oven. As a busy mom, it's important to Christi that her recipes are family-friendly and picky eater approved. In addition to running Love From The Oven, Christi is the author of The My Little Pony Baking Book and Smart Cookie, and the co-author of Peeps-A-Licious.
I’ve only been making my dog his food for a couple of months. In all the research I’ve done from Holistic Vets and other knowledgeable people I agree with the person who said these recipes are lacking in nutritional value for your pet. I learned that dogs have a short digestive tract so brown rice is not good for them, it will go right through them without being digested. If you want to feed your dog grains, ( I don’t) white rice is at least digestible. Bone meal should be added if your going to feed your dog any meat. Dogs in the wild would eat the flesh of pray also some of the bones. Feeding your pet veggies and fruits is good if you add canine digestive enzymes to the food. Apparently this will help to break down the veggies and make them digestible actually adding nutritional value. It’s a must to add some other nutrients like a superfood supplement containing ground flax seed, dried kelp,lecithin, the B vitamins, omega 3 and 6 fatty acids and so many other needed ingredients. Adding prebiotics and probiotics is necessary also.
With all the recalls and my concern over ingredients, I started cooking 2 yrs ago for my guy. The base for his dog food is quinoa with flax and chia seeds. I cook the grain, adding coconut oil and turmeric. I top this with a protein- good organic chicken, boneless pork, scrambled egg with shell included, occasionally beef – a veggie addition depends on what I have– carrot, green bean , spinach- add a tbsp of pumpkin, and plain yoghurt. All the eyestain on my little white dog has DISAPPEARED ! His energy is great, and no more itchy skin. He loves dinner!! And he seems to feel as good as he looks!
Place the water, ground turkey, rice, and rosemary into a large Dutch oven. Stir until the ground turkey is broken up and evenly distributed throughout the mixture; bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat to low and simmer for 20 minutes. Add the frozen vegetables, and cook for an additional 5 minutes. Remove from heat and cool. Refrigerate until using.
My Cockapoo is my best friend, my hearing (I am deaf), and just precious to me. She has seizures which I believe are a result of recommendations from my vet to give her preventative Ivahart. I stopped giving her all drugs except the phenobarbital which she will be on for the rest of her life. I say this because she almost died last year from a very severe seizure. She has had hip surgery from a fall from my porch chasing other dogs. That is the background. Now, after wasting money on commercial dog food I have thrown away many times. After watching my dog not eat at all, vomit, loose bowls, and dull coat – I decided to cook for her and have been for many years now. She weighs about 15 pounds, feels heavy when I pick her up, but she is all muscle, not fat.
Opened my eyes and had the realization that it can’t be healthy to eat slimy, greasy canned meat and meat-flavored cereal every day of your life and no wonder at 6 months, my pup is already refusing to eat even the highest top shelf dog foods… I haven’t even switched his diet for a full week yet and his stool is finally firm. No more diarrhea. His eyes are brighter and twinkling brighter than I’ve ever seen before. He’s excited to eat. He jumped up and down. It’s so worth the time and effort and is cheaper than the expensive can food. He still gets a sprinkle of kibble in his food just to make sure he isn’t lacking any minerals or vitamins. I regret not doing it sooner…
Interesting, my vet didn’t recommend Hill’s to us but I believe you. Now understanding the point made, I agree with you Twyla. If a dog food isn’t working for your dog and you’ve introduced it to them slowly then changing food is a good idea. As you said, homemade food is a good option as well as organic. In the end, each dog is different so you’ll need to play around with it until you find a healthy balance for your dog. Thanks for the comment and input Twyla!
Thank you to the readers who have mentioned the issue with using bacon fat for dogs. A trace amount of bacon grease (two tablespoons divided amongst 30 biscuits = less than 1 gram of bacon fat per serving) shouldn’t be a concern. Of course, we’re not veterinarians over here, so please check with your vet or use an alternative type of oil if you are concerned.
You can also find other additives to toss in to ensure your dog gets all the nutrients he needs, like Nupro Dog Supplement or Wiz Pet Multi Goodness. These supplements will ensure your dog’s homemade diet is well balanced and good for them. For even more recipes than we’ve outlined in this post, we’ve suggested dog cookbooks after each recipe so you can test out other feasts.
I needed to help my 10 yr old, 100 lb dog lose weight. I found that he loved cooked vegetables, especially green beans, that are filling yet low in calories. So I bought the huge (1 gal) can of green beans and added a large scoop to his regular kibble when I didn’t have other cooked vegetables left over from my meals. He love sauerkraut too! I was working full time and didn’t have a lot of extra time to cook his meals from scratch.
I make food for my three dogs… The recipe is 1.5 cups of brown rice, 1.5 cups of brown lentils cooked in the instant pot for 23 minutes with 6 cups of broth and 3 sweet potatoes and a half cup of bone meal. Then I cook and food process 8 pounds of chicken or ham. Blend both parts together and refrigerate. I vary the meat from week to week as well as the veggies.
Thankfully, Sage doesn’t have any special allergies or dietary needs, so there’s really no reason for me to make her homemade dog treats other than the fact that I love her something fierce and needed a break from cookies for a minute. But conveniently, this homemade dog treats recipe makes a TON and we know lots of other neighbor-ly dogs who can and will appreciate a little gift bag of soft-baked, peanut butter and bacon glazed homemade dog treats.

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Cleaning the Cutters - You want to clean your dog cookie cutters as soon as your dog biscuits are in the oven. Using warm water and mild soap is usually all you'll need. Once they are washed, place them on a clean baking sheet and pop them into the oven for a couple minutes. This will help them to dry completely and avoid rust. Once they are cooled, they can be stored.
“Quality control” doesn’t have a nice ring to it – anyone involved in the manufacturing of pet foods, pet medicine or other pet products that require quality control and monitoring by agencies like FDA and USDA do not want to hear about it, because it increases costs. This is why companies that make human-grade dog food and have frequent factory inspections (like The Honest Kitchen) have to raise costs for their pet food products.
I don’t give her dog treats. She gets carrots, watermelon, celery (doesn’t like celery too much), and once in a while a smear of natural peanut butter on a carrot. I pretty much cook for her like the recipes in this article. No flour though. And no seasoning of any kind. When she gets an occasional upset stomach, I give here white rice and chicken only.
With all the recalls and my concern over ingredients, I started cooking 2 yrs ago for my guy. The base for his dog food is quinoa with flax and chia seeds. I cook the grain, adding coconut oil and turmeric. I top this with a protein- good organic chicken, boneless pork, scrambled egg with shell included, occasionally beef – a veggie addition depends on what I have– carrot, green bean , spinach- add a tbsp of pumpkin, and plain yoghurt. All the eyestain on my little white dog has DISAPPEARED ! His energy is great, and no more itchy skin. He loves dinner!! And he seems to feel as good as he looks!
Hi Matt, Thanks for your question. You can make sure your dog gets calcium and fatty acids by sprinkling a powdered supplement or drops to your dog’s meals. There are many products on the market. Because the serving size varies widely based on your dog’s weight and other factors, we urge you to consult your vet for the best recommendations for your pup.

Thank you to the readers who have mentioned the issue with using bacon fat for dogs. A trace amount of bacon grease (two tablespoons divided amongst 30 biscuits = less than 1 gram of bacon fat per serving) shouldn’t be a concern. Of course, we’re not veterinarians over here, so please check with your vet or use an alternative type of oil if you are concerned.
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