I don’t feel grains or occasionally having certain kinds of fermented dairy are necessarily that bad. They have been in human diets, and therefore dog diets, for thousands of years without harm. I think goat dairy is supposed to be more digestible for dogs and humans if someone is insistent on that kind of a product. But, for whatever reason you want to choose, there are digestive issues coming out in our day to these products that have not existed before and so some care isn’t necessarily unwarranted. Balance is always key.

This dog treat recipe is perfect if you’ve got some fun cookie cutters on hand. And since it’s peanut butter based it’s pretty much guaranteed to be a hit with your dog. I have yet to meet a dog who doesn’t go bonkers for PB. For this recipe you’ll need 2 cups of whole wheat flout, 1 tablespoon baking powder, 1 cup unsalted natural peanut butter and 1 cup skim milk.
This homemade dog treat recipe is perfect for novice cooks (myself included). If you’re interested in making some super simple dog treats I’d recommend starting out with this easy recipe. The only ingredients you need are 2 cups of organic whole wheat flour and 2 jars of pureed baby food. For the baby food I’ve found Laika loves blueberry, beef and sweet potato.
Find out from your vet how much insulin she needs for 10 grams of carbohydrate. Then to the chicken or other meats add turnip greens and sweet potatoes. You might add a small amount of rice Cook the rice in 7 times more water than rice. ( 1 cup of rice to 7 cups of water or 1/4 cup rice to 1 and 3/4 cups if water. 1/2 cup rice to 3 1/2 cups water. I know every rice chart says less but dogs like it better with more water AND dogs drink less water if there is more in the rice.
Hi Kathy! I believe there was a link toward the beginning of the article but, for a puppy, the general rule (from what I understand) is 1/2 a cup for every 5 pounds of weight. So, if your pup weighs 15 pounds, you’d feed it 1 1/2 cups a day, ideally splitting it into three servings (most commonly 7am, 12pm, and 5pm) of 1/2 a cup. I hope I helped you out a bit!
It’s also common to find by-products and fillers (check the labels of any treats you might have in the cupboard) in dog biscuits rather than natural, organic or high-quality ingredients. When you make small batches of your own doggie biscuits, there’s no need for extra additives or preservatives, another great reason to tie on an apron and get creative in the kitchen.
Peanut butter and apples are a great snack, whether you're human or canine. Mix together 4 C. flour, 1 tbs. baking powder, 2 3/4 C. water, 1/2 tsp. vanilla, 4 tbsp. honey, 1/4 C. finely chopped apple, 1 tbsp. peanut butter and 1 beaten egg. Spoon into small muffin molds and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for about 75 minutes. Remove chews from the molds as soon as they are cool enough to handle. Store in an air-tight container in the refrigerator. For a healthier treat, substitute 1 C. wheat germ for 1 C. of flour, and add 2 tbsp. of ground flax seed.
I didn’t realize you could make dog treats with only 2 ingredients, That’s awesome! All of the recipes sound great. I read some of the other posts, and I’m borrowing one of the ideas. My daughter is in a Girl Scout troop and her troop’s project is to volunteer at a shelter. I will check with the shelter and see if we can bring homemade treats. Thanks for all of the ideas!
In my experience that is odd. I have experienced the exact opposite in my dogs, and I have more rice and a ton of vegetable matter. Is the Rachel Ray food also a new thing for your dogs? Because kibble is typically associated with voluminous stools. Meat and carrots certainly wouldn’t cause this problem on their own. Are you cooking the game meat? I sure hope so…introduction of a raw protein might also cause loose as well as voluminous stool, not to mention being a potential source of parasitic infection, but that’s a whole nother issue.

Many dog food recipes fall short in certain nutrients, especially iron, copper, calcium, and zinc. Even some recipes created by veterinarians don't measure up. The University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine tested 200 recipes, many written by vets. The researchers found most of the recipes were short on some essential nutrients.

I needed to help my 10 yr old, 100 lb dog lose weight. I found that he loved cooked vegetables, especially green beans, that are filling yet low in calories. So I bought the huge (1 gal) can of green beans and added a large scoop to his regular kibble when I didn’t have other cooked vegetables left over from my meals. He love sauerkraut too! I was working full time and didn’t have a lot of extra time to cook his meals from scratch.
Hi Kathy! I believe there was a link toward the beginning of the article but, for a puppy, the general rule (from what I understand) is 1/2 a cup for every 5 pounds of weight. So, if your pup weighs 15 pounds, you’d feed it 1 1/2 cups a day, ideally splitting it into three servings (most commonly 7am, 12pm, and 5pm) of 1/2 a cup. I hope I helped you out a bit!
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When your pooch refuses to eat commercial dog food, be it dry or canned, then sooner or later you might be faced with a problem: you won't have any prepared DIY homemade dog food meals on hand (due to lack of time or whatnot) at home and your canine may be refusing to eat anything else. Fortunately, this is relatively easy to avoid by feeding your dog some commercial dog food from time to time from an early age.
I’ve been making my own dog food for over a year now. I started when one of my pups got sick and I had to make him a bland diet of chicken and rice. They love the “human food” and I feel good knowing they are getting the healthiest diet possible. I do add the supplement Azestfor to the food to make sure they are getting all their nutrients. If you are questioning if your dog is getting enough supplements I would definitely recommend using it. 🙂
This post totally cracked me up! Mainly because I have been thinking of making little pup treats for 2 weeks now. I’ve been hooked on Diane’s Gingie cookies (see OvenHug for the best gingie recipe eh=vah) and making them non-stop. Our finicky little chihuahua mix loves sharing bites with me. I want to make a gluten free version of my gingies so that our senior pup, Oscar can also join us – he has sensitive tummy issues. I just need to find a bone shaped cookie cutter and we’re in business. Thanks for the laughs. Your pup cookies look amazin’! Thanks for sharing. xo
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“In 2015, the World Health Organization found that processed meats such as bacon and sausage were known carcinogens linked to cancer. Bacon is an incredibly rich and fatty food with a high salt content, which can prove to be too much for a dog’s stomach to handle. Eating a large amount can cause pancreatitis, which can be fatal.” [http://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/natural-foods/can-dogs-eat-pork/]”
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