​This is a different type of recipe, in fact there's no real recipe here at all. This is more instruction on how to construct your own recipe using optimal ingredients for a properly nutrtionally balanced meal. They have sources several scientific studies and even vet endorsed sample diets in order to give you a better idea of what's suitable for your dog - a highly recommend you give this a read.
Hi Kathy! I believe there was a link toward the beginning of the article but, for a puppy, the general rule (from what I understand) is 1/2 a cup for every 5 pounds of weight. So, if your pup weighs 15 pounds, you’d feed it 1 1/2 cups a day, ideally splitting it into three servings (most commonly 7am, 12pm, and 5pm) of 1/2 a cup. I hope I helped you out a bit!
As an example, my dog (100 pounds) eats 3-4 cups per day (plus measured out treats). If I just used the amount he ate in one day there might be enough difference to have an effect. His food is 393 kcal/cup. He needs about 1200-1600 kcals a day from his food- or 1400/day. If I change food all I have to do is a bit of math and I’ve got what he should be eating. One food may be digested better or worse than another so you still have to feel the ribs. Calories, not volume or weight, is the way to go.
I have 3 dogs, a border collie, poodle mix and a daschund. They get along very well and we take them daily for at least an hour and 1/2 walk. Lately though, the two smaller ones refuse to eat at their normal feeding time. Dennis, the collie, happily eats, but Teddy and Murdog shiver and hide. I work from home and make their gravy from fresh veg. We spend plenty time together and they are loved and very well taken care of. Why have the little ones behaviour changed so drastically in such a short time?
The easiest way is to throw everything in a large slow cooker. 5 pounds regular ground beef, 3 pounds chopped beef liver, three cups of frozen or fresh veg and/or fruit, (carrots, peas, butternut squash, broccoli, blueberry, pumpkin etc.) 4 cups parboiled rice, 8 cups of water. 5 hours on high, longer on low and its done. A weeks worth in the fridge in what it was cooked in for an 80 lb dog. (substitute liver with any other organ, or rice with oats, quinoa, egg noodles, rice noodles).
It’s also common to find by-products and fillers (check the labels of any treats you might have in the cupboard) in dog biscuits rather than natural, organic or high-quality ingredients. When you make small batches of your own doggie biscuits, there’s no need for extra additives or preservatives, another great reason to tie on an apron and get creative in the kitchen.
I’m assuming you are changing over to a homemade diet because you have health concerns related to commercially produced dog food. Please research the contents of ALL commercial foods. You will be appalled. It ranges in offensiveness from low quality, to poisonous and downright carcinogenic. Proteins are frequently comprised of beaks, feathers, and high temperature steamed bonemeal. The most common source of “animal protein” is actually a meal that is produced using euthanized, ill farm and COMPANION animals…..as well as the medications that were in their systems when they were eventually determined to be terminal. There are a multitude of articles online with which you can educate yourself about the heinous nature of commercial dog food (yes, even the “premium” foods) so I guess the short answer is…..NO, if you care about what your dog is eating, don’t feed anything that you purchase human grade ingredients and prepare yourself! Btw, organic is best if you can afford it. The chemicals in human food are just as detrimental to your dog as they are for you, although having a shorter lifespan, they obviously won’t suffer some of the cumulative affects that humans do.
Oven baked with love and coated in raw goodness, the first biscuit treats that truly mirror a whole prey diet! Our Raw Coated Biscuits are full of meat and organ meat for a treat as nature intended that your dog will go wild for! We start with the world’s finest ingredients. Next we gently bake with love in small batches and finally we coat every biscuit in raw goodness to make the perfect treat!
It’s also common to find by-products and fillers (check the labels of any treats you might have in the cupboard) in dog biscuits rather than natural, organic or high-quality ingredients. When you make small batches of your own doggie biscuits, there’s no need for extra additives or preservatives, another great reason to tie on an apron and get creative in the kitchen.
Kitchn’s Delicious Links column highlights recipes we’re excited about from the bloggers we love. Follow along every weekday as we post our favorites.Flank steak is a great way to mix up proteins during the week, so your dinner isn’t all chicken, every day. It’s a comparatively inexpensive cut of beef, and I find it way easier to cook than chicken, because you don’t need to worry nearly as much about getting the meat to the exact right temperature.

When preparing homemade dog treats, make sure you take into account any allergies that your pet has to specific ingredients. You will want to avoid adding any ingredient that you know that your pet has reacted poorly to in the past. If you are experimenting with new flavors, feed the treat to your dog in a small amount to see how he reacts to it before distributing an entire treat. Store your homemade dog treats in an airtight container and place them in the freezer. Allow the treat to thaw for 10 – 20 minutes prior to serving to your dog. Treats can last for up to 6 months in the freezer.

The root to such mistakes is usually in the fact that owners assume dogs can eat almost everything we can, and it may be healthy for them. And while it’s true that dogs are omnivores, have stronger stomachs than us (in some ways) and some human foods are extremely good for them, there's a number of food items you should be careful about when preparing your dog’s next dinner.


I do not know what discussion is going on, i do have some questions. I am new to all of this making your dog food and I wish i had done this from the start, but better late then never. I can only do Chicken or Turkey recipes, my male English Setter, can not eat beef, he has had 2 severe pancreatic attacks, once at 1 1/2, and then the camp ground managers stopped and gave him treats when we were gone, both times we almost lost him. That being said, with their weight, they get 1 cup of dry in the am & pm, should taht be what i feed to them with cooked or raw dog food?


Feeding your dog a DIY homemade dog food is something that more and more dog owners are doing these days. It’s understandable as many of us are becoming aware of the shady manufacturing practices in the pet food industry, filler ingredients, fake “Made in USA” labels and other things harmful to our pets. Using homemade dog food recipes is a way to let your pooch enjoy the finer things in life, in particular high-quality and delicious meat.
I have a 9 year old toy poodle mix and a 5 year old shih tzu- and they are very finicky so I started cooking for them and my vet was okay with it. I make either turkey or chicken I use brown rice, green peas ,green beans, carrots, zucchini, pumpkin/ or sweet potatoes and sometimes broccoli and cauliflower. I cook the ground meat with olive oil then cut and boil all vegetables let both sit then cook rice. I mix everything together and I will add a can of dog pumpkin (low in sugar) I make a big pot and freeze in big freezer 1 gallon bag which is 1 week for both dogs. I usually cook once a month. My dogs love it they lick the plates. Seems happier. I also saw where people are worried about calcium, well I give my dogs every morning 3 tablespoon of goat milk for each dog. It does take about an hour or so to complete the receipt but worth it. My dogs haven’t gained weight and because of all the water in vegetables they hardly drink water which they drank so much with commercial food. It makes me so happy to see them happy
What a load of crap. There isn’t a single good recipe that is appropriate for dogs here. Have you even watched the Canine Cancer Series? I’m looking for a good recipe for my sister’s dog (I feed raw & wouldn’t feed this garbage to any dog). 40% protein is crap. 80% protein is required. 10% offal 10% bone (added after cooking or a good bone meal supplement) any add ins like green leafy veggies & a very few berries would be in addition to this. Oats & rice are grains, sweet potato, apple, beets, peas. Nothing I’d feed my carnivore ever.
She eats two small meals a day, about a half cup each. And a small amount to take her med with at the end of the day. I brush her teeth because soft food sticks. After what she went through with a pro cleaning, I don’t want her to be sad and hurt again. So never will she go to bed without a cleaning. I try to remember to brush after breakfast as well. I was giving her Dancing Paws vitamins but I can’t seem to get them anywhere anymore. So now I am researching organic vitamins.
​This is a different type of recipe, in fact there's no real recipe here at all. This is more instruction on how to construct your own recipe using optimal ingredients for a properly nutrtionally balanced meal. They have sources several scientific studies and even vet endorsed sample diets in order to give you a better idea of what's suitable for your dog - a highly recommend you give this a read.
All of the above dog food recipes will be deficient in many essential nutrients. There is no significant source of calcium or adequate sources of micronutrients such as B vitamins, vitamin D, etc. In addition to lacking calcium, the calcium:phosphorus ratio is an important consideration. Please consult your veterinarian before feeding any home diet. These are not adequate!!
Sit. Lay down. Roll over. Paw. Who’s a good girl? (Or, of course, boy!) These are common phrases uttered by dog owners around the world before their dogs favorite time of the day—treat time. While it’s common for dog owners to want to shower their dog with treats to keep them happy, you’ll want to make sure that you're choosing the best option for your pet. There’s a lot to consider when it comes to dog treats — does your dog like the treats, have any allergies or health conditions, and do the treats you choose support overall health needs of your pet? The dog treat market can be a bit difficult to navigate, so we’ve done the navigating for you.
Many homemade dog food recipes don’t have a full range of vitamins and minerals. Unless you want to get very into adding supplements and so on to make sure your homemade is nutritionally balanced, I’d feed a mix of homemade and high quality kibble – kibble is already fortified with the necessary vitamins and minerals. I’d also double check the recommended protein/carb/fat balance for a puppy – what puppies need and what adult dogs need aren’t the same, so you might need to tweak the homemade food recipes to add or subtract rice and other carb sources to make the ratios right for a puppy. (This is particularly important for larger breed dogs as they need the right balance for joint and bone development for long term health.)
Place the water, ground turkey, rice, and rosemary into a large Dutch oven. Stir until the ground turkey is broken up and evenly distributed throughout the mixture; bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat to low and simmer for 20 minutes. Add the frozen vegetables, and cook for an additional 5 minutes. Remove from heat and cool. Refrigerate until using.
Christi is the baker, cook, blogger, food photographer, recipe developer and sprinkle lover behind Love From The Oven. As a busy mom, it's important to Christi that her recipes are family-friendly and picky eater approved. In addition to running Love From The Oven, Christi is the author of The My Little Pony Baking Book and Smart Cookie, and the co-author of Peeps-A-Licious.
Also to go along with my previous message, I add the supplements I mentioned to each serving. Dr. Goodpet has been recommended as a good source of some of the ingredients, vitamins and digestive enzymes, I add Kal Bone Meal, and The Missing Link superfood supplement. As I said earlier, do your own research to find the proper mix of real food for your pet.

Hi Kathy! I believe there was a link toward the beginning of the article but, for a puppy, the general rule (from what I understand) is 1/2 a cup for every 5 pounds of weight. So, if your pup weighs 15 pounds, you’d feed it 1 1/2 cups a day, ideally splitting it into three servings (most commonly 7am, 12pm, and 5pm) of 1/2 a cup. I hope I helped you out a bit!

Soft & chewy Buddy Biscuits are palatable with no crunch. An excellent choice for all dogs, especially older dogs or smaller dogs who prefer a softer treat. Along with indulging your pup, Buddy Soft & Chewy treats are also perfect for training, with a low calorie count and chock full of flavor to keep your dog motivated. Buddy Biscuits are also oven baked in the USA with only quality, recognizable ingredients. Healthy dog treats made with quality ingredients and natural peanut butter. Palatable, chewy dog treats perfect for older dogs. Baked in USA only. Contain no added corn, soy, fillers,artificial colors, flavors and artificial preservatives


If your pup loves to chew, make your own chew strips with fresh chicken. Slice chicken breasts into 1/8" thick strips and dehydrate in an oven set to 200 degrees Fahrenheit for about two hours, or until the chicken is dried and chewy. Sprinkle with anise prior to drying for extra flavor. Turkey also can be substituted. Poultry chews make a nice alternative to rawhide treats, which could contain chemicals or preservatives. Store extra chews in the refrigerator or freezer. Chicken jerky can also be made in the microwave by cooking the strips for 20 minutes on medium power until they are chewy.

I tried to make the Beef Stew and the recipe had me confused (easy to do ). In the listing of ingredients, it says 1/2 cup of flour, and “ 1/2 cup water or organic vegetable oil, plus 1 Tablespoon vegetable oil for frying.” So is that correct? 1/2 cup of water OR 1/2 cup of oil?? Isn’t that kind of a lot of oil? Anyway, I tried the 1/2 cup of water and with 1/2 cup of flour, this became a big ball of yuck. What did I do wrong??


This Easter we were gifted a 22-pound ham (!!!) and while we had our share of Easter feasts, we’ve still got a decent amount left over. I’m not even a little bit mad, because I know I can freeze some for future use and that there are plenty of ways — big and small — that we can use it up this week. Here are 17 of my favorite recipes for using up leftover ham. City hams freeze incredibly well. My suggestion? Freeze the ham in different forms for future use.
Thank you to the readers who have mentioned the issue with using bacon fat for dogs. A trace amount of bacon grease (two tablespoons divided amongst 30 biscuits = less than 1 gram of bacon fat per serving) shouldn’t be a concern. Of course, we’re not veterinarians over here, so please check with your vet or use an alternative type of oil if you are concerned.
I was wondering about how much to feed my dog. The problem is I see things listing Giant Breeds as 75-100 pounds but my actually Giant of a dog is 165. I would like to transition him to a cooked diet but I don’t want to under or over feed him based on doing the math wrong. Do you have any charts or resources that can help me with an actual giant dog? This would hopefully include both food and vitamins.
My little dog is 8 years old I have had her for about 2 months she is a rescue dog, we have bonded very much and she is health. A few days ago she stopped eating I have tried changing her dog food but she will have nothing to do with it and I have tried to give her chicken and hamburger but she wont eat that either. What should I do? Help I am getting very worried about. Thanks for your help.
Free Standard Shipping automatically applies to your qualifying minimum online purchase subtotal of $49. No promotion code necessary. Subtotal refers to the amount of your one-time delivery order before taxes and shipping. The qualifying subtotal excludes any Repeat Delivery order or buy online and pick up in-store orders. All Free Shipping is based on Standard Shipping rates. P.O. Boxes, Alaska/Hawaii are based on USPS Priority Mail.

As an example, my dog (100 pounds) eats 3-4 cups per day (plus measured out treats). If I just used the amount he ate in one day there might be enough difference to have an effect. His food is 393 kcal/cup. He needs about 1200-1600 kcals a day from his food- or 1400/day. If I change food all I have to do is a bit of math and I’ve got what he should be eating. One food may be digested better or worse than another so you still have to feel the ribs. Calories, not volume or weight, is the way to go.
This dog treat recipe is perfect if you’ve got some fun cookie cutters on hand. And since it’s peanut butter based it’s pretty much guaranteed to be a hit with your dog. I have yet to meet a dog who doesn’t go bonkers for PB. For this recipe you’ll need 2 cups of whole wheat flout, 1 tablespoon baking powder, 1 cup unsalted natural peanut butter and 1 cup skim milk.
×