Hi I am new to this site and have an Anatolian Sheperd and a Heinz 57 that I am going to start supplementing their kibble with your great recipes. I have a question on the yogurt and since I know it is a great probiotic how is it that dogs can eat it and not have digestive issues since it is dairy? My big guy weighs about 110 lbs and the gal about 60. She can eat anything he has a sensitive gut and I have been told a little yogurt wil help. Thanks
Dogs of all ages, from puppies to seniors, enjoy treats. Dog treats are a wonderful way to bond with your pet, give them something to chew on, reward them for good behavior or just to see them jump for joy. You'll find all their favorites at PetSmart, where we carry a wide selection of top brands. Snacks can even be part of their healthy diet every day, if used sparingly. Dental chews help keep their teeth clean and their gums healthy. Even pups with food sensitivities have a selection of gluten free, grain free, and natural dog treats to choose from. With real meaty bones, flavored dental treats, crunchy cookies and baked goods, rawhide, puppy treats and more, finding something they'll love is simple.
If your fur baby has a sweet tooth he will love these chews, and oatmeal adds protein and is good for digestion. To make these chewy treats, puree 1/4 C. diced peaches, 1 tbsp. canola oil, 1 tbsp. molasses, 1/4 tsp. vanilla and 1/8 C. water. Combine the puree with 2 C. rolled oats, 1/2 C. water, 1 C. flour and 1 tsp. cinnamon. Scoop spoon-sized dollops on to a lightly greased baking sheet, press them flat with the back of the spoon, and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes. These chewy cookie treats can be stored for two weeks in the refrigerator or six months in the freezer.
“Quality control” doesn’t have a nice ring to it – anyone involved in the manufacturing of pet foods, pet medicine or other pet products that require quality control and monitoring by agencies like FDA and USDA do not want to hear about it, because it increases costs. This is why companies that make human-grade dog food and have frequent factory inspections (like The Honest Kitchen) have to raise costs for their pet food products.

This homemade dog treat recipe is perfect for novice cooks (myself included). If you’re interested in making some super simple dog treats I’d recommend starting out with this easy recipe. The only ingredients you need are 2 cups of organic whole wheat flour and 2 jars of pureed baby food. For the baby food I’ve found Laika loves blueberry, beef and sweet potato.
These recipes for dinners are not balanced at all. I would never dream of feeding this many veggies and carbs with such low protein amount. What about calcium? What about fish oils, Vitamine E? And that you say never to change them up? Wow… I hope no one feeds this long term. There are reliable facebook groups with formulas for calculating the correct percentages of food.
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​No Crockpot?  No problem - just make a potato beef stew with whatever pot you have around the kitchen, your dog will appreciate the effort all the same. Amanda even takes it a step further and supplements her dog food with extra dog vitamins, which is a great idea. Just make sure you talk to the Vet first so they can receive the optimal level of nutrients needed for your dog.
If your pup loves to chew, make your own chew strips with fresh chicken. Slice chicken breasts into 1/8" thick strips and dehydrate in an oven set to 200 degrees Fahrenheit for about two hours, or until the chicken is dried and chewy. Sprinkle with anise prior to drying for extra flavor. Turkey also can be substituted. Poultry chews make a nice alternative to rawhide treats, which could contain chemicals or preservatives. Store extra chews in the refrigerator or freezer. Chicken jerky can also be made in the microwave by cooking the strips for 20 minutes on medium power until they are chewy.
Thankfully, Sage doesn’t have any special allergies or dietary needs, so there’s really no reason for me to make her homemade dog treats other than the fact that I love her something fierce and needed a break from cookies for a minute. But conveniently, this homemade dog treats recipe makes a TON and we know lots of other neighbor-ly dogs who can and will appreciate a little gift bag of soft-baked, peanut butter and bacon glazed homemade dog treats.
I’ve only been making my dog his food for a couple of months. In all the research I’ve done from Holistic Vets and other knowledgeable people I agree with the person who said these recipes are lacking in nutritional value for your pet. I learned that dogs have a short digestive tract so brown rice is not good for them, it will go right through them without being digested. If you want to feed your dog grains, ( I don’t) white rice is at least digestible. Bone meal should be added if your going to feed your dog any meat. Dogs in the wild would eat the flesh of pray also some of the bones. Feeding your pet veggies and fruits is good if you add canine digestive enzymes to the food. Apparently this will help to break down the veggies and make them digestible actually adding nutritional value. It’s a must to add some other nutrients like a superfood supplement containing ground flax seed, dried kelp,lecithin, the B vitamins, omega 3 and 6 fatty acids and so many other needed ingredients. Adding prebiotics and probiotics is necessary also.
Most companies that makes homemade dog food include the heart, kidneys,and liver of whatever meat you want. Do you have recipes that include these ingredients? They charge at Least$200 a month to feed my dog if I order online homemade but if I get these ingredients at the butcher it’s only about $12 for the organs so I want to do it myself. Can you please suggest recipes that include these?

So dairy products may not make you dog drop down dead, but they’re still not good for dogs! It’s annoying because SO many dog products have dairy in them EVEN IN HOME MADE RECIPES! Dairy, through studies, has lactose in it–which may cause a real stomach upset in some dogs! Although some dogs are fine with dairy (tough stomachs!) I prefer to avoid it along with the risk of sickness and stomach upset.


I cook for our dogs. We have a 13 year old standard poodle, a yellow lab who is 14 and 2 toy rat terriers. The poodle was seriously sick about a month ago. We did not get a specific diagnosis but he had fever of 107 he did not perk his ears, wag his tail, his rear legs could barely hold him up to pee. He had to be carried out and back in. The only thing he would eat was baked chicken thighs. Now he is back to normal and the lab is sick. Today she was able to get up without assistance one time and twice she was able to get up the 4 steps to the porch. There has been about 2 weeks that she could not get up without assistance She has not had the high fever and both have an occasional huffy cough.
I’ve been making these for a long time now. My dog, Lola, knows by the smell when I’m baking for her and is in the kitchen the whole time! To make it easier, I use a pizza cutter and make 1x3” long strips instead of the bone shape. It is much faster with less rolling and these strips fit very nicely into Lola’s Kong. I use all natural peanut butter, and if I remember, get it freshly ground at the grocery store. I also buy the real Ceylon cinnamon to avoid any coumarin overdose if I give her too many treats.

In the past food was left out for them and some would be thrown out next morning which I assumed was a sign they were getting plenty but now they clean everything up and show like I said a remarkable change the youngest is a 3-year-old little cross Jack Russel/Shitzu and she has always had coarse hair and I would say a thin frame but never looked starving just excepted as being small framed she now has a smooth coat and apart from her name “spud” as she looked like a baked potato with a tail ( I wanted to call her Gizmo after the gremlin with her satellite dish ears) when we got her as a rescue pup you would not believe its the same dog, she was always happy with a none stop wagging tail and looked healthy but she looks so much healthier and both of them seem different in themselves in a way I can’t explain but for the better.
I spent two decades as a companion animal nutritionist, and the recipes in this article are bunk. Lacking in major vitamins and minerals. If you’re going to make homemade pet food, cooked OR raw, you NEED organ meats and bone for complete nutrition. Period. If you don’t use organ meats, you need to try to find a balance of supplemental vitamins and minerals… and having just one of these ingredients out of balance can mean suffering or death for your pet.
I have a 5 month old puppy who will not eat unless beyond starving, I have tried every brand of dog food on the market, wet and dry. Making my own was the only choice I was left with and she eats a different meal every day. Dogs only get “sensitive” to food if you stick with one kind morning, noon and night, then they have issues. If they have a varied diet from young, they have no problems. Mine has boundless energy perfect poos, glossy coat and bright eyes.
How about vitamins & minerals, i cant find it now but i seen one recipe taht said you can not feed a home made diet without feeding them the vitamins, and is there specific ones that i should look for and is that placed in their food when you serve it, or when you cook it? And what is the best book to help decide raw or cooked, and recipes for both, along with the vitamins..

Many homemade dog food recipes don’t have a full range of vitamins and minerals. Unless you want to get very into adding supplements and so on to make sure your homemade is nutritionally balanced, I’d feed a mix of homemade and high quality kibble – kibble is already fortified with the necessary vitamins and minerals. I’d also double check the recommended protein/carb/fat balance for a puppy – what puppies need and what adult dogs need aren’t the same, so you might need to tweak the homemade food recipes to add or subtract rice and other carb sources to make the ratios right for a puppy. (This is particularly important for larger breed dogs as they need the right balance for joint and bone development for long term health.)
I bought this for my 20lb dog who looooooves cheese. I like it because I can easily break it into small pieces for training (one piece is about 1.5" and that's too big for him as a training treat), and my dog who is allergic to a lot of things doesn't seem to have any reaction to this one. However, he isn't crazy about it (he likes it though!), which means its taste is not as cheesy as I hoped. We are in the middle of an intense training period and I need to have different levels of treats. I wanted this one to be the highest prize but unfortunately it didn't work that way.
While DIY dog food recipes can be fun to make and a healthy alternative to consuming canned food or kibble, they may still lack all the essential minerals and vitamins needed. So in addition to PetPlate, we encourage you to check out these other dog food delivery options that are specially formulated by dog nutritionists and shipped directly to you for your pup to enjoy.
The Pumpkin dog biscuit recipe is incomplete. It calls for cold water, but does not give you instruction on where/when to use said water. It also calls for you to reserve some of the “rice mixture” but then asks you to add the pumpkin mixture (w egg(s), even though recipe says 1 egg). How then would you reserve the mixture to which you are adding? It also says it makes 24 “balls,” but details instructions to roll out on parchment paper. Just overall very unclear.
Not sure what I did wrong but the dough turned out SOOOOO wet! I ended up adding another 1/2 cup of oats and another 1-1.5 cups of flour before I could work with it! And it was still very gummy. BUT I got it to work and they are now done. They hardened up well still. Just time to cool and let the pooch try them out! I’m sure he will love them but I’m just curious why my dough was so wet? Overall I’m still very happy with the base of this recipe and ingredients as some I’ve seen have me questioning if it’s a good idea to feed some of the ingredients to my pup. I did sub out canola oil for olive oil as well as I didnt have an canola!
Bake these healthy treats a shorter time to keep them chewy, or a little longer for a crispy outside and chewy center. Combine a pound of ground beef, turkey or chicken liver with 1 C. corn meal, 1 1/2 C. flour, 1 tsp. anise seed and 1/2 tsp. salt. Spread into a greased baking pan, bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes, and slice into squares when cool. Substitute fennel for anise if needed. Add an egg, or grated apple or carrot for more nutrition and flavor. Any ground organ meat, such as heart, can be used in place of liver. Dogs love these chewy brownies with nearly any kind of meat.
Temperatures are rising, flowers are blooming, and the spring season is now in full force. And doesn’t it truly just feel like meringue time? Lots of fresh eggs mean more whites for cooking and baking — including light-as-air meringue cookies and luscious, meringue-topped pie. And when it comes to the latter, we are always on the hunt for ways to make meringue as light, fluffy, and luxurious as possible.

Also to go along with my previous message, I add the supplements I mentioned to each serving. Dr. Goodpet has been recommended as a good source of some of the ingredients, vitamins and digestive enzymes, I add Kal Bone Meal, and The Missing Link superfood supplement. As I said earlier, do your own research to find the proper mix of real food for your pet.

I’ve raised my Shih Tzu since he was 10 weeks old, and he is currently 3 years old. Everyday he eats a different fruit/vegetable, typically with chicken, but he also occasionally he eats salmon, beef, pork (very sparingly since it can cause worms), and turkey. He also eats lentils, rice, beans, and oatmeal. I also add eggshell powder, nutritional yeast, Vitamin C, a small amount of garlic, and fish oil to their food. Variety is good — they need it to get proper nutrition. I’ve never had any dietary problems with him, his skin is healthy and he is energetic. I recently adopted a 8 yr old Llasa Aapso who was religiously fed so called high quality grain free kibble his entire life (I know this because I am related to the prior owner). He developed chronically itchy skin (with blisters and black scar tissue from scratching), and his owners did not know what to do with him. I immediately switched him over to a home made diet (like my Shih Tzu) and he immediately improved. I did give him the anti-fungal, anti-bacterial medication and prednisone the vet prescribed to initially improve (but not get rid of) his skin condition. The vet wanted me to give him the prescription diet and cortisone shots to keep the condition at bay. However, I refused because I know personally based on my own diet changes (I used to be 100+ pounds overweight and I lost it by eating better—not less— food) how feeding your body higher quality food can drastically change your condition. It has been a couple of months, and the Llasa is almost unrecognizable. I truly believe that feeding dogs commercially prepared dog foods leads to many ailments down the road. No human doctor would prescribe eating Total cereal, and a multivitamin to obtain optimum or even mediocre health. I don’t know why people think it is any different for animals and kibble (even high quality ones).

Awesome recipes! Our yellow lab loves the turkey/rice/veggie mix and the chicken jerky strips! Was surprised that our dog loved the rosemary spice in the turkey recipe. Just made the beef/rice meal in the crock pot yesterday and it passed the taste test! Thank you for sharing these great nutritious recipes. Our lab has a lot of energy with these well rounded recipes!


Meet my new favorite brunch dish: Hawaiian Roll Egg-in-a Hole. You might be familiar with egg-in-a-hole as a beloved childhood breakfast dish, but this version is easier to cook for a crowd, and delivers big on flavor. Serve this egg bake for family brunch, or whip it up when you’re feeding a hungry crowd. Here are my tricks for nailing it every time. At first glance, this recipe is pretty straightforward: Make a well in each roll, crack in an egg, and bake!
Originally from Chicago, Nicole Janiga joined the Chewy team as a marketing intern in January 2017. Since then, Nicole has continued writing and photographing for Chewy as a Content Collaborator while completing her education at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business. She is majoring in both marketing and corporate innovation, before returning to Chewy as a Marketing Analyst. In her free time, Nicole enjoys traveling, riding her horse or snuggling up with her Pug, @zoetheloaf, and Terrier, Cozmo. 
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