I started cooking for my three German Shepherds about 6 months ago, after a lot of frustration with diarrhea, allergies and other issues. Within a few days the diarrhea ended, then a few weeks later I noticed they were shedding less and not scratching anymore. One of my dogs had allergies so bad she needed injections every 8 weeks or she’d scratch her ears raw. Now she no longer needs the shots. They’re all pooping a small fraction of what they used to, so that means everything they’re eating is being used. Their coats are shiny and even strangers have commented on how healthy they look. I will never go back to commercial dog food. And they all LOVE the food!!! Now I need to add some homemade kibble to their diet.
Originally from Chicago, Nicole Janiga joined the Chewy team as a marketing intern in January 2017. Since then, Nicole has continued writing and photographing for Chewy as a Content Collaborator while completing her education at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business. She is majoring in both marketing and corporate innovation, before returning to Chewy as a Marketing Analyst. In her free time, Nicole enjoys traveling, riding her horse or snuggling up with her Pug, @zoetheloaf, and Terrier, Cozmo. 

For example, substituting one ingredient with another may seem innocent enough when the two ingredients are similar in our eyes, but for a dog’s body this may not be so. When you get a dog food recipe from a reputable source (and you double check with at least 2-3 other reputable sources), it’s important that you follow the recipe to the letter. If you need to substitute, make sure you research or better yet, consult with a canine nutritionist.


I am making food for my 7 year old shih tzu. I have read books and am putting in 1/4 tea egg shells for calcium and some chicken liver with the meat, vegetables and rice or other grain I use to make the food. Would I need to add a supplement? What do you suggest? My Vet was concerned about me making the food. After a scare with a recall that I did not know about until months after my dog was having problems, I cannot imaging that the canned food I used is better for my dog. But, I want to make the food and make it the best I can. Thank you.
Hi Kathy! I believe there was a link toward the beginning of the article but, for a puppy, the general rule (from what I understand) is 1/2 a cup for every 5 pounds of weight. So, if your pup weighs 15 pounds, you’d feed it 1 1/2 cups a day, ideally splitting it into three servings (most commonly 7am, 12pm, and 5pm) of 1/2 a cup. I hope I helped you out a bit!
Also, keep in mind that each of these best homemade dog food recipes requires additional supplements such as zinc, choline, vitamin D and E, copper, calcium or others, depending on your dog's nutritional needs. The reason I haven’t listed them is that the correct dosages depends on the age, breed, size and pre-existing health conditions of your dog – you really must consult with a vet or canine nutritionist about these things.
It’s Earth Day — or Earth Month, as we prefer! — so naturally, we’re turning our focus to the kitchen. And specifically ways we can create less waste and be more efficient and thoughtful with our output. Between packaging and food scraps, some degree of kitchen waste feels inevitable. For most, there’s no way to eliminate it entirely, but there are a lot of small and easy ways to limit the amount of waste coming out of our kitchens.

Hello and thanks for the comment! We believe that having a diet consisting of 50% vegetables of assorted colors and types provides the necessary vitamins needed for any living being. Regarding feeding your dog raw: we completely respect your position and appreciate that you are feeding raw to your dog. Canine Journal has never taken a stance on raw diets. We only shared what the American Veterinary Medical Association’s position is on the matter. We only said that the AVMA is not ok with raw. This is not misinformation this is a fact to show that the AVMA is not behind this. That does not mean that other vets are not behind it. Wishing you and your pup a healthy winter!


Feeding your dog a DIY homemade dog food is something that more and more dog owners are doing these days. It’s understandable as many of us are becoming aware of the shady manufacturing practices in the pet food industry, filler ingredients, fake “Made in USA” labels and other things harmful to our pets. Using homemade dog food recipes is a way to let your pooch enjoy the finer things in life, in particular high-quality and delicious meat.
That is a great question, Teresa! From what we’ve found, there is no nutritional requirement for wheat in a dog’s diet, but there are benefits to its presence. Certain wheats contain fibers that help the grown of beneficial bacteria in the gut or intestines. Fiber found in wheat helps keep your dog’s bowel movements regular. Older dogs are more susceptible to develop constipation, so an increase in fiber can help keep things moving. Wheat also packs a burst of energy, the carbs found in wheat grain are great for fueling muscular and metabolic activities.
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With all the recalls and my concern over ingredients, I started cooking 2 yrs ago for my guy. The base for his dog food is quinoa with flax and chia seeds. I cook the grain, adding coconut oil and turmeric. I top this with a protein- good organic chicken, boneless pork, scrambled egg with shell included, occasionally beef – a veggie addition depends on what I have– carrot, green bean , spinach- add a tbsp of pumpkin, and plain yoghurt. All the eyestain on my little white dog has DISAPPEARED ! His energy is great, and no more itchy skin. He loves dinner!! And he seems to feel as good as he looks!
Christi is the baker, cook, blogger, food photographer, recipe developer and sprinkle lover behind Love From The Oven. As a busy mom, it's important to Christi that her recipes are family-friendly and picky eater approved. In addition to running Love From The Oven, Christi is the author of The My Little Pony Baking Book and Smart Cookie, and the co-author of Peeps-A-Licious.
I have 3 dogs, a border collie, poodle mix and a daschund. They get along very well and we take them daily for at least an hour and 1/2 walk. Lately though, the two smaller ones refuse to eat at their normal feeding time. Dennis, the collie, happily eats, but Teddy and Murdog shiver and hide. I work from home and make their gravy from fresh veg. We spend plenty time together and they are loved and very well taken care of. Why have the little ones behaviour changed so drastically in such a short time?
The food isn’t for your kid it’s for your dog. Dogs don’t need sweets, but some foods need to be mushy for them to be able to digest it. May I suggest you take a look at the ingredients in your store bought dog food and notice all the uses of the word ‘meal’ it may taste better to your kids, but I guarantee you it’s not as good for your dog as homemade.
I cook I large sweet potato, about a quart of fresh turnip greens in 3 1/2 quarts of water which has 1 tablespoon of salt in it. When the water barely starts to boil I sprinkle a mixture of long grain white rice and brown rice in while stirring. Some times I add a pint of frozen mixed vegetables (with Lima beans). I set the stove as low as it will go and stir occasionally to be sure it is not sticking. You will think it is too much water but it will all be absorbed. I cook a large pack of chicken thighs in the oven at 280 degrees for about an hour and a half about every 4 days. I use 2 or 3 a day. When the other stuff is done I cut the 2 or 3 thighs up with the scissors and add some of the liquid from the cooking of the chicken. I dip up 2 and 1/2 cups of the mixture for each large dog 2 times a day. One time a day I crush one multiple vitamin and 2 glucosamine regular human vitamins and add to each big dog serving. Both times a day I add 1 tablespoon of dry milk. To each serving. Sometimes I use ground beef. And sometimes I add chicken livers.
From fetching his favorite ball to successfully sitting on command, your dog deserves delicious and healthy dog treats. In addition to your verbal praise and affection, there's nothing your dog enjoys more than some mouth-watering rawhide bones or crunchy training treats. Having a natural inclination to please, dogs love to be praised, which is why it's important that they be rewarded with healthy dog biscuits. Healthy dog treats can also add variety to your dog's diet. And because peanut butter dog treats are a fan favorite, they are often available in varieties that provide additional nutritional support under the cloak of their delicious flavor. There are treats enriched with glucosamine to promote better hip and joint health, wheat-grass for better digestion, and more. For dogs with allergies, there are hypoallergenic organic dog treats that are wheat, gluten and corn-free, and even low-calorie treats for less active dogs.
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Most companies that makes homemade dog food include the heart, kidneys,and liver of whatever meat you want. Do you have recipes that include these ingredients? They charge at Least$200 a month to feed my dog if I order online homemade but if I get these ingredients at the butcher it’s only about $12 for the organs so I want to do it myself. Can you please suggest recipes that include these?
Kelsie- My 10 yr old lab has mast cell. I met with a holistic vet after my vet wanted to keep her on steroids (which are not good). I am now cooking her food and this recipe does not give everything that’s needed and flour is not good. I also just started her on a drink for humans called NingXia Red. It’s expensive, but the holistic vet recommended it (she does not sell it either so she had nothing to gain from telling me this). Check with your vet or a holistic vet in your area on what you should be feeding. A lot of foods give off histamines which are not good for mast cell patients. Good luck!
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