I do not know what discussion is going on, i do have some questions. I am new to all of this making your dog food and I wish i had done this from the start, but better late then never. I can only do Chicken or Turkey recipes, my male English Setter, can not eat beef, he has had 2 severe pancreatic attacks, once at 1 1/2, and then the camp ground managers stopped and gave him treats when we were gone, both times we almost lost him. That being said, with their weight, they get 1 cup of dry in the am & pm, should taht be what i feed to them with cooked or raw dog food?
I’ve been feeding my doggies my own recipe for dog food for the last few years and they all are doing so much better! (Investing in an Instant Pot is a life and time saver!) My 13 year old schnoodle got so much more pep back in his step after getting put on this diet. He still prances about. They have less intestinal issues and it saved me money. I’ll never go back. I make it daily and keep containers well stocked to miss some days of making if needed.
Also, please note that because of volume , we are unable to respond to individual comments, although we do watch them in order to learn what issues and questions are most common so that we can produce content that fulfills your needs. You are welcome to share your own dog tips and behavior solutions among yourselves, however Thank you for reading our articles and sharing your thoughts with the pack!
I’ve only been making my dog his food for a couple of months. In all the research I’ve done from Holistic Vets and other knowledgeable people I agree with the person who said these recipes are lacking in nutritional value for your pet. I learned that dogs have a short digestive tract so brown rice is not good for them, it will go right through them without being digested. If you want to feed your dog grains, ( I don’t) white rice is at least digestible. Bone meal should be added if your going to feed your dog any meat. Dogs in the wild would eat the flesh of pray also some of the bones. Feeding your pet veggies and fruits is good if you add canine digestive enzymes to the food. Apparently this will help to break down the veggies and make them digestible actually adding nutritional value. It’s a must to add some other nutrients like a superfood supplement containing ground flax seed, dried kelp,lecithin, the B vitamins, omega 3 and 6 fatty acids and so many other needed ingredients. Adding prebiotics and probiotics is necessary also.
In my experience that is odd. I have experienced the exact opposite in my dogs, and I have more rice and a ton of vegetable matter. Is the Rachel Ray food also a new thing for your dogs? Because kibble is typically associated with voluminous stools. Meat and carrots certainly wouldn’t cause this problem on their own. Are you cooking the game meat? I sure hope so…introduction of a raw protein might also cause loose as well as voluminous stool, not to mention being a potential source of parasitic infection, but that’s a whole nother issue.

For example, substituting one ingredient with another may seem innocent enough when the two ingredients are similar in our eyes, but for a dog’s body this may not be so. When you get a dog food recipe from a reputable source (and you double check with at least 2-3 other reputable sources), it’s important that you follow the recipe to the letter. If you need to substitute, make sure you research or better yet, consult with a canine nutritionist.

Awesome recipes! Our yellow lab loves the turkey/rice/veggie mix and the chicken jerky strips! Was surprised that our dog loved the rosemary spice in the turkey recipe. Just made the beef/rice meal in the crock pot yesterday and it passed the taste test! Thank you for sharing these great nutritious recipes. Our lab has a lot of energy with these well rounded recipes!
As I eat my weight in sweet strawberries this time of year, the subject of what to do with the abundance of spring and summer fruit comes to mind. I am usually more than content with enjoying berries and stone fruit as-is, but when I’ve gone a little overboard at the farmers market, jam is one of the many things I consider making. Or is it jelly? The two terms for fruit spread have always confused me a bit. Luckily, there’s an easy way to distinguish between the two.
Surprisingly, there's a number of homemade dog food recipes found online that consist of things that no dog should consume (or consume very little, yet the recipe mentions dangerous amounts). Some of the more extreme examples include giving your dog large amounts of garlic as a way to prevent intestinal worms or feeding your pup avocado, “because it’s healthy for people”.
Hi…I just recently started making my own wet food to add to the grain free kibble for my dogs. My older dog seems to have a definite allergy to wheat. We adopted a new dog and in my effort to entice him to eat, I introduced him to a regular wet food with his kibble and let my older one have some as well. Within 2 months, we noticed that he was showing signs of atopic dermititus around his eyes. So now I am making their food with ground turkey, kidney beans, peas, carrots and brown rice and adding some fish oil once it is cooked. Within a week, we are seeing an great improvement to his eyes…plus, they love it! Less expensive than anything from the store!

Dogs of all ages, from puppies to seniors, enjoy treats. Dog treats are a wonderful way to bond with your pet, give them something to chew on, reward them for good behavior or just to see them jump for joy. You'll find all their favorites at PetSmart, where we carry a wide selection of top brands. Snacks can even be part of their healthy diet every day, if used sparingly. Dental chews help keep their teeth clean and their gums healthy. Even pups with food sensitivities have a selection of gluten free, grain free, and natural dog treats to choose from. With real meaty bones, flavored dental treats, crunchy cookies and baked goods, rawhide, puppy treats and more, finding something they'll love is simple.
Thank you Andrea, your formula makes much more sense, and remember reading about the tests for high protein, it is pretty much the formula I use as well. For people who are just treading water, a handful of their usual kibbles while they get their formula perfected would be advisable. And wean from there when they have confidence, or just continue to add that handful…but homemade dog food, when you get it right, is the bomb! If you have it down, you will see a huge difference in your pups. Both in appearance and energy. And really so easy, make up a month at a time and freeze in pound containers. And you are also recycling all those pound containers you would otherwise throw out. It’s all good. Jill
While DIY dog food recipes can be fun to make and a healthy alternative to consuming canned food or kibble, they may still lack all the essential minerals and vitamins needed. So in addition to PetPlate, we encourage you to check out these other dog food delivery options that are specially formulated by dog nutritionists and shipped directly to you for your pup to enjoy.

Hi Audra, in step 5 it says to slowly add the water in. You reserve some of the rice mixture to be used as topping for the cookies at the end. As for it saying egg(s) that was a typo, our apologies, we’ll be sure to fix that. It says it makes 24 1-oz balls to give you an idea that you will get 24 oz of these treats. However, everyone has different size cookie sheets and desired thickness so saying you’ll get 24 treats isn’t very clear because some people may make the treats larger or smaller than others. Sorry this was confusing for you, I hope that clears some of the confusion up. Please let me know if I can help any further.


So dairy products may not make you dog drop down dead, but they’re still not good for dogs! It’s annoying because SO many dog products have dairy in them EVEN IN HOME MADE RECIPES! Dairy, through studies, has lactose in it–which may cause a real stomach upset in some dogs! Although some dogs are fine with dairy (tough stomachs!) I prefer to avoid it along with the risk of sickness and stomach upset.
Hi Kathy! I believe there was a link toward the beginning of the article but, for a puppy, the general rule (from what I understand) is 1/2 a cup for every 5 pounds of weight. So, if your pup weighs 15 pounds, you’d feed it 1 1/2 cups a day, ideally splitting it into three servings (most commonly 7am, 12pm, and 5pm) of 1/2 a cup. I hope I helped you out a bit!
×