I have a 9 year old toy poodle mix and a 5 year old shih tzu- and they are very finicky so I started cooking for them and my vet was okay with it. I make either turkey or chicken I use brown rice, green peas ,green beans, carrots, zucchini, pumpkin/ or sweet potatoes and sometimes broccoli and cauliflower. I cook the ground meat with olive oil then cut and boil all vegetables let both sit then cook rice. I mix everything together and I will add a can of dog pumpkin (low in sugar) I make a big pot and freeze in big freezer 1 gallon bag which is 1 week for both dogs. I usually cook once a month. My dogs love it they lick the plates. Seems happier. I also saw where people are worried about calcium, well I give my dogs every morning 3 tablespoon of goat milk for each dog. It does take about an hour or so to complete the receipt but worth it. My dogs haven’t gained weight and because of all the water in vegetables they hardly drink water which they drank so much with commercial food. It makes me so happy to see them happy

Dog treats serve a number of useful purposes. They help satisfy your dog’s need to chew, and they’re an indispensable part of training, especially for food-motivated pups. Crunchy dog biscuits and smaller treats can be given as dog training treats or everyday snacks to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Long-lasting dog treats are great for special occasions. They can help reduce stress as your dog chews or keep her occupied when guests visit. Every pup loves good natural dog bones or bully sticks, and naturally shed antlers for dogs will keep your dogs chewing happily for hours. Chewy also contains a wide range of dog treats including dental chews dog treats, soft dog treats, dog jerky treats, freeze dried dog treats, prescription dog treats, dehydrated dog treats and more. Treat-dispensing dog toys can add another layer of chewing fun. Get the best dog treats, pet food online at Chewy!


Originally from Chicago, Nicole Janiga joined the Chewy team as a marketing intern in January 2017. Since then, Nicole has continued writing and photographing for Chewy as a Content Collaborator while completing her education at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business. She is majoring in both marketing and corporate innovation, before returning to Chewy as a Marketing Analyst. In her free time, Nicole enjoys traveling, riding her horse or snuggling up with her Pug, @zoetheloaf, and Terrier, Cozmo. 
I have always cooked for my dogs but, they also get a premium kibble with their home cooked foods. This way, I know they get the nutrition they needs. I supplement with fresh fruits and veggies everyday as well. They’re all extremely healthy with zero issues. Dogs should still have some kibble, it is nutritionally complete, good for their teeth. For my senior, I soften his. I wouldn’t and, have never relied on my homemade foods as a sole source of their nutrition. Just slow cook whatever they can eat, they’ll love you for it 🙂
There aren't a lot of soft treats suitable for older dogs that have few remaining teeth, mine is such a dog...she loves them...I looked at the soft treats found in the store, many, many of them oddly contain garlic which is listed as bad for dogs....using such treats not knowing that, mine lost a 3" patch of fur...I threw them away and switched to this treat as well as ceaser treats...her fur has grown back and all seems well...as for flavor, I gave them a 5, not because I have eaten them but again, my dog likes them lol
Dogs, wolves, anyone can get salmonella poisoning. It’s what they call survival of the fittest. We don’t exactly keep track of the wolves that are dying and surviving. Plus, their bodies are quite used to it. And as Dawn said below, our dogs are not wild anymore. With children around the house and the way our dogs kiss us/sleep on the bed, I would not feed our dogs raw diet because as we evolve, so do our domesticated dogs. I completely agree that kibble is a big no, but would not feed my dogs raw either.

I am making food for my 7 year old shih tzu. I have read books and am putting in 1/4 tea egg shells for calcium and some chicken liver with the meat, vegetables and rice or other grain I use to make the food. Would I need to add a supplement? What do you suggest? My Vet was concerned about me making the food. After a scare with a recall that I did not know about until months after my dog was having problems, I cannot imaging that the canned food I used is better for my dog. But, I want to make the food and make it the best I can. Thank you.


my daughter gave me a deer head/ applehead chiahihiau for a late chritmas present she will be 1 year old the end of july I am noticeing the she will not eat the store boughten treats so I thought I would try homemade treats im also noticeing she will not play with toys I think because she was mistreated befor I got her I keep trying thank you for listening
When your pooch refuses to eat commercial dog food, be it dry or canned, then sooner or later you might be faced with a problem: you won't have any prepared DIY homemade dog food meals on hand (due to lack of time or whatnot) at home and your canine may be refusing to eat anything else. Fortunately, this is relatively easy to avoid by feeding your dog some commercial dog food from time to time from an early age.

- Exclusions: ORIJEN, ACANA, Taste of the Wild, Hill's Pet Nutrition food and treats (Hill's Prescription Diet, Hill's Science Diet, Hill's Ideal Balance and Hill's Bioactive Recipe); Purina brands (Pro Plan, Muse, Beyond and Tidy Cats); Petsafe Brands (PetSafe, SportDOG, Frolicat, Drinkwell, Solvit', ScoopFree, Pet Loo, Gentle Leader, Mr. Herzher's and Piddle Place); Educator E-Collars; Playology; Dollar per Gallon tanks, 50% off or more tanks; select Precious Cat litter products; select Zilla Critter Cages; WholeHearted Memberships, Repeat Delivery orders and subscriptions; out-of-stock items, prior purchases, Donations, Petco Gift Cards and eGift Cards.

Hi I am new to this site and have an Anatolian Sheperd and a Heinz 57 that I am going to start supplementing their kibble with your great recipes. I have a question on the yogurt and since I know it is a great probiotic how is it that dogs can eat it and not have digestive issues since it is dairy? My big guy weighs about 110 lbs and the gal about 60. She can eat anything he has a sensitive gut and I have been told a little yogurt wil help. Thanks


Dogs of all ages, from puppies to seniors, enjoy treats. Dog treats are a wonderful way to bond with your pet, give them something to chew on, reward them for good behavior or just to see them jump for joy. You'll find all their favorites at PetSmart, where we carry a wide selection of top brands. Snacks can even be part of their healthy diet every day, if used sparingly. Dental chews help keep their teeth clean and their gums healthy. Even pups with food sensitivities have a selection of gluten free, grain free, and natural dog treats to choose from. With real meaty bones, flavored dental treats, crunchy cookies and baked goods, rawhide, puppy treats and more, finding something they'll love is simple.

Have you tried removing an ingredient each feeding to see if maybe it’s one specific thing she is allergic too …. otherwise it could be something environmental maybe the metel or plastic in the dish she eats from maybe a plant or pollen from a nearby plant materials from rugs or carpets … Also I feed honey to my allergy pup just drizzle a couple tablespoons over food as it’s anti fungel and helped tremendously with three of my allergy babies also plain yogurt I mix it with a little natural peanut butter and purred banana freeze for a treat in ice cube trey or small cups I wish you best of luck hope you find her some relief

It’s also common to find by-products and fillers (check the labels of any treats you might have in the cupboard) in dog biscuits rather than natural, organic or high-quality ingredients. When you make small batches of your own doggie biscuits, there’s no need for extra additives or preservatives, another great reason to tie on an apron and get creative in the kitchen.
My dogs are 9-lb Chihuahuas, and they LOVE these Buddy Biscuits Soft & Chewy Peanut Butter treats! l like that they are soft and easy for my dogs to chew, and the size is perfect for small breed dogs. Because they are soft treats, my dogs don't leave a pile of crumbs on the floor after eating these treats! I usually give my dogs each a few of these treats right before heading out the door whenever I have to leave the house; because these are peanut butter flavor, my hand doesn't stink like meat right after reaching into the bag to give them to my dogs! Major plus in my book!
I’ve been making my own dog food for over a year now. I started when one of my pups got sick and I had to make him a bland diet of chicken and rice. They love the “human food” and I feel good knowing they are getting the healthiest diet possible. I do add the supplement Azestfor to the food to make sure they are getting all their nutrients. If you are questioning if your dog is getting enough supplements I would definitely recommend using it. 🙂
An important part of my dog’s diet is the kefir course, which she gets in the morning. The probiotic is important. It is homemade kefir with ground flax seed a little raw oats, and either flax or coconut oil. After that she gets a bowl of chicken or fish or leftover meat from my son’s unfinished meals, dal (chana or split peas or lentils) cooked with quinoa or rice (occasionally) or raw oats with veggies like carrots, small potatoescelery, yams or squash or even blueberries. Long ago with other dogs i fed raw lamb when i first read about homemade dog meals, but it is pricey now.I add greens to the stew but often she removes. Therefore i always add wheatgrass power. She gets oil or butter with every bowl of food, feeding the dal/rice/meat dish 2x day. She also gets vinegar in the dal along with indian spices and garlic. Some day yea some nay on garlic but i thing it is good. No onions or avocados. No chocolate or pizza or pasta. She gets the vinegar to help with itchy skin. The fish is generally raw or lightly poached. Their stomachs were designed to be able to handle raw meat. Sometimes she gets eggs lightly cooked, on the loose runny side. I add good homemade bone broths when cooking dal. I add liverwurst to pigs ears for snackage. I also add iodine drops to her water, which is never tap, except when in the park. I am in search of a non rip off vitamin and appreciate others’ comments herein regarding vitamins. And i always examine her . Not saying perfect but better than the hell of neverending kibble. Sometimes i give her a handful of kibble as a snack. Good to keep a small bag of good stuff for emergencies.
I have been cooking for our three elderly toy poodles (ages 23, 15, and 15) for a couple of years now, with the vet’s approval and suggestions. I use a pressure cooker set at high for 30 minutes. Combine 2 lbs of ground chicken, 12 oz of raw whole grains (brown rice, steel-cut oatmeal, and/or quinoa) and about a cup of mixed veggies (either diced frozen ones from a bag, or leftovers from our table). Add a tablespoon of sea salt (vet suggested that, for the minerals.) Water to cover in the pot – usually about 8 cups. This makes several days’ worth of dog food; we keep one day’s worth in the fridge and freeze the rest. When we dish it out, we add a powdered supplement recommended by the vet for each dog (one has kidney problems, the other two are just old.)
I cook I large sweet potato, about a quart of fresh turnip greens in 3 1/2 quarts of water which has 1 tablespoon of salt in it. When the water barely starts to boil I sprinkle a mixture of long grain white rice and brown rice in while stirring. Some times I add a pint of frozen mixed vegetables (with Lima beans). I set the stove as low as it will go and stir occasionally to be sure it is not sticking. You will think it is too much water but it will all be absorbed. I cook a large pack of chicken thighs in the oven at 280 degrees for about an hour and a half about every 4 days. I use 2 or 3 a day. When the other stuff is done I cut the 2 or 3 thighs up with the scissors and add some of the liquid from the cooking of the chicken. I dip up 2 and 1/2 cups of the mixture for each large dog 2 times a day. One time a day I crush one multiple vitamin and 2 glucosamine regular human vitamins and add to each big dog serving. Both times a day I add 1 tablespoon of dry milk. To each serving. Sometimes I use ground beef. And sometimes I add chicken livers.
An important part of my dog’s diet is the kefir course, which she gets in the morning. The probiotic is important. It is homemade kefir with ground flax seed a little raw oats, and either flax or coconut oil. After that she gets a bowl of chicken or fish or leftover meat from my son’s unfinished meals, dal (chana or split peas or lentils) cooked with quinoa or rice (occasionally) or raw oats with veggies like carrots, small potatoescelery, yams or squash or even blueberries. Long ago with other dogs i fed raw lamb when i first read about homemade dog meals, but it is pricey now.I add greens to the stew but often she removes. Therefore i always add wheatgrass power. She gets oil or butter with every bowl of food, feeding the dal/rice/meat dish 2x day. She also gets vinegar in the dal along with indian spices and garlic. Some day yea some nay on garlic but i thing it is good. No onions or avocados. No chocolate or pizza or pasta. She gets the vinegar to help with itchy skin. The fish is generally raw or lightly poached. Their stomachs were designed to be able to handle raw meat. Sometimes she gets eggs lightly cooked, on the loose runny side. I add good homemade bone broths when cooking dal. I add liverwurst to pigs ears for snackage. I also add iodine drops to her water, which is never tap, except when in the park. I am in search of a non rip off vitamin and appreciate others’ comments herein regarding vitamins. And i always examine her . Not saying perfect but better than the hell of neverending kibble. Sometimes i give her a handful of kibble as a snack. Good to keep a small bag of good stuff for emergencies.
Meet my new favorite brunch dish: Hawaiian Roll Egg-in-a Hole. You might be familiar with egg-in-a-hole as a beloved childhood breakfast dish, but this version is easier to cook for a crowd, and delivers big on flavor. Serve this egg bake for family brunch, or whip it up when you’re feeding a hungry crowd. Here are my tricks for nailing it every time. At first glance, this recipe is pretty straightforward: Make a well in each roll, crack in an egg, and bake!
Easter Baba (or babka, or babka wielkanocna) has graced Easter tables for Polish families for centuries — along with mazurek cookies, painted eggs, and cheese desserts. The backstory is this: The dessert was originally said to be made in pans that resembled a tall Bundt pan, but without the hole in the center. One medieval recipe claims that their special version — which calls for 24 eggs and 1 tablespoon of freshly pounded vanilla beans that are beaten for more than an hour (!
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Usually soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits are just that, soft and chewy. Not these. They were so hard and stale that my dog who normally won't eat any treats except the soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits, just looked at me with a glare as though to say, Are you kidding me?! So I tried to give them away to dogs I saw loose in the park. Again no deal. Amazon is great on some things but not Buddy Biscuits. Save your money and buy locally where you'll get the fresh, soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits.
Homemade dog food recipes are one of the more controversial topics among pet owners and veterinarians. Depending on who you ask, you may hear that homemade dog food is a waste of time and no more nutritionally beneficial than commercial diets or that the best homemade dog food recipes can have an extremely positive effect on your dog's health and well-being.
Treat your pup to a festive meal around the holidays with this recipe from VetCo. It utilizes a lot of leftover ingredients you'll find on your dining room table. The ingredients are safe for your dog. You can whip this meal up in only a few minutes and spoil your canine companion. The recipe makes a lot of food, so you'll need to portion it out based on your dog's size.
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- Free Standard Shipping offer is not valid cat litter, dog litter, ice melter, wild bird food; live fish, rock and sand, ocean water, crystals and salt; aquatic gravel and accents; crickets, live and frozen food. Cat litter, dog litter, wild bird food, live & frozen food and oversized items may incur an additional per-item shipping & handling fee or surcharge. Shipping to Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands or P.O. Boxes will result in a surcharge. This is based on your default shopping address.
Just because humans eat dairy does not make it a healthy food for dogs. You can find anything online to agree with a particular viewpoint. I would say cow’s milk is a species inappropriate food for both dogs AND humans— that’s my online viewpoint. 😉 Each dog may have minor variances from each other, but each dog is not THAT unique. Both humans and dogs seem to adapt to whatever they eat, but that doesn’t mean that what they are eating is exactly the best for them. Dogs can’t tell us when they don’t feel well after eating something. And unfortunately, a lot of dietary intolerances come out as health issues down the road instead of being an immediate reaction.
Dog treats serve a number of useful purposes. They help satisfy your dog’s need to chew, and they’re an indispensable part of training, especially for food-motivated pups. Crunchy dog biscuits and smaller treats can be given as dog training treats or everyday snacks to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Long-lasting dog treats are great for special occasions. They can help reduce stress as your dog chews or keep her occupied when guests visit. Every pup loves good natural dog bones or bully sticks, and naturally shed antlers for dogs will keep your dogs chewing happily for hours. Chewy also contains a wide range of dog treats including dental chews dog treats, soft dog treats, dog jerky treats, freeze dried dog treats, prescription dog treats, dehydrated dog treats and more. Treat-dispensing dog toys can add another layer of chewing fun. Get the best dog treats, pet food online at Chewy!
I can't say enough about this company! Yes, my dog has enjoyed their product (all flavors) and yes, I appreciate that they always seem fresh and soft so I can easily break them into small pieces for my shih tzu....but the main reason is I like dealing with this company. Both times I have needed to return something (once I made a mistake on my order and now, just after I ordered two more bags, my vet has placed my dog on a restrictive diet and she can no longer have these treats) they have just refunded my money ....no questions, no returning the product, no hassle! It's so refreshing! I will continue to recommend Buddy Biscuits even though Cali can no longer eat them.
I went online for advice about my dogs having a touch of the runs to be blunt and it seemed many said at first try changing to a bland diet of rice and chicken then I went looking for recipes for homemade dog food and found myself here and can honestly say I will never buy dog food from the store again and sure for just sake of a little time my dogs eat healthier and have a noticeable change in just one week and I reckon cost less to feed which I would pay more anyway if I thought it was good for them.
I have Bostons too, they are kind of known for their gassiness. 🙂 Anytime there is a dietary change, it can cause some gas, especially if you’ve gone from kibble to fresh. It usually lessens after they get used to the new food. You can try adding some digestive enzymes and perhaps plain unsweetened yogurt or probiotics, which can help if the gas is bad.
Also, keep in mind that each of these best homemade dog food recipes requires additional supplements such as zinc, choline, vitamin D and E, copper, calcium or others, depending on your dog's nutritional needs. The reason I haven’t listed them is that the correct dosages depends on the age, breed, size and pre-existing health conditions of your dog – you really must consult with a vet or canine nutritionist about these things.
Have you tried removing an ingredient each feeding to see if maybe it’s one specific thing she is allergic too …. otherwise it could be something environmental maybe the metel or plastic in the dish she eats from maybe a plant or pollen from a nearby plant materials from rugs or carpets … Also I feed honey to my allergy pup just drizzle a couple tablespoons over food as it’s anti fungel and helped tremendously with three of my allergy babies also plain yogurt I mix it with a little natural peanut butter and purred banana freeze for a treat in ice cube trey or small cups I wish you best of luck hope you find her some relief
I’m assuming you are changing over to a homemade diet because you have health concerns related to commercially produced dog food. Please research the contents of ALL commercial foods. You will be appalled. It ranges in offensiveness from low quality, to poisonous and downright carcinogenic. Proteins are frequently comprised of beaks, feathers, and high temperature steamed bonemeal. The most common source of “animal protein” is actually a meal that is produced using euthanized, ill farm and COMPANION animals…..as well as the medications that were in their systems when they were eventually determined to be terminal. There are a multitude of articles online with which you can educate yourself about the heinous nature of commercial dog food (yes, even the “premium” foods) so I guess the short answer is…..NO, if you care about what your dog is eating, don’t feed anything that you purchase human grade ingredients and prepare yourself! Btw, organic is best if you can afford it. The chemicals in human food are just as detrimental to your dog as they are for you, although having a shorter lifespan, they obviously won’t suffer some of the cumulative affects that humans do.
Quick question…. I’m considering switching to homemade food for my dogs – one is a senior and one is moderately overweight – so I’m just trying to learn as much as I can. I notice there are certain ingredients listed in the Nutritional Guidelines for Calcium and Fatty Acids but none of the recipes include these things. Are these added as needed or should be part of each recipe? BTW…thank you for the great article and recipe ideas!
These recipes for dinners are not balanced at all. I would never dream of feeding this many veggies and carbs with such low protein amount. What about calcium? What about fish oils, Vitamine E? And that you say never to change them up? Wow… I hope no one feeds this long term. There are reliable facebook groups with formulas for calculating the correct percentages of food.
Temperatures are rising, flowers are blooming, and the spring season is now in full force. And doesn’t it truly just feel like meringue time? Lots of fresh eggs mean more whites for cooking and baking — including light-as-air meringue cookies and luscious, meringue-topped pie. And when it comes to the latter, we are always on the hunt for ways to make meringue as light, fluffy, and luxurious as possible.

How about vitamins & minerals, i cant find it now but i seen one recipe taht said you can not feed a home made diet without feeding them the vitamins, and is there specific ones that i should look for and is that placed in their food when you serve it, or when you cook it? And what is the best book to help decide raw or cooked, and recipes for both, along with the vitamins..


I went online for advice about my dogs having a touch of the runs to be blunt and it seemed many said at first try changing to a bland diet of rice and chicken then I went looking for recipes for homemade dog food and found myself here and can honestly say I will never buy dog food from the store again and sure for just sake of a little time my dogs eat healthier and have a noticeable change in just one week and I reckon cost less to feed which I would pay more anyway if I thought it was good for them.
Many good ideas here, however, I am absolutely appalled that you would suggest a dog eat dairy. A does not suckle a cow, a calf does. Dogs should also not be fed grains “as their ancestors did”. Wolves do not and have not ever eaten grains and as they made the transition to an omnivorous diet, still have never eaten grains. Dogs should ONLY be fed meat and vegetables, and fruit is also okay. Please correct this on your website as soon as possible so avoid giving false information to dog owners and potentially damaging their canines health.
I don’t feel grains or occasionally having certain kinds of fermented dairy are necessarily that bad. They have been in human diets, and therefore dog diets, for thousands of years without harm. I think goat dairy is supposed to be more digestible for dogs and humans if someone is insistent on that kind of a product. But, for whatever reason you want to choose, there are digestive issues coming out in our day to these products that have not existed before and so some care isn’t necessarily unwarranted. Balance is always key.
This dog treat recipe is perfect if you’ve got some fun cookie cutters on hand. And since it’s peanut butter based it’s pretty much guaranteed to be a hit with your dog. I have yet to meet a dog who doesn’t go bonkers for PB. For this recipe you’ll need 2 cups of whole wheat flout, 1 tablespoon baking powder, 1 cup unsalted natural peanut butter and 1 cup skim milk.
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