Many homemade dog food recipes don’t have a full range of vitamins and minerals. Unless you want to get very into adding supplements and so on to make sure your homemade is nutritionally balanced, I’d feed a mix of homemade and high quality kibble – kibble is already fortified with the necessary vitamins and minerals. I’d also double check the recommended protein/carb/fat balance for a puppy – what puppies need and what adult dogs need aren’t the same, so you might need to tweak the homemade food recipes to add or subtract rice and other carb sources to make the ratios right for a puppy. (This is particularly important for larger breed dogs as they need the right balance for joint and bone development for long term health.)


I’ve raised my Shih Tzu since he was 10 weeks old, and he is currently 3 years old. Everyday he eats a different fruit/vegetable, typically with chicken, but he also occasionally he eats salmon, beef, pork (very sparingly since it can cause worms), and turkey. He also eats lentils, rice, beans, and oatmeal. I also add eggshell powder, nutritional yeast, Vitamin C, a small amount of garlic, and fish oil to their food. Variety is good — they need it to get proper nutrition. I’ve never had any dietary problems with him, his skin is healthy and he is energetic. I recently adopted a 8 yr old Llasa Aapso who was religiously fed so called high quality grain free kibble his entire life (I know this because I am related to the prior owner). He developed chronically itchy skin (with blisters and black scar tissue from scratching), and his owners did not know what to do with him. I immediately switched him over to a home made diet (like my Shih Tzu) and he immediately improved. I did give him the anti-fungal, anti-bacterial medication and prednisone the vet prescribed to initially improve (but not get rid of) his skin condition. The vet wanted me to give him the prescription diet and cortisone shots to keep the condition at bay. However, I refused because I know personally based on my own diet changes (I used to be 100+ pounds overweight and I lost it by eating better—not less— food) how feeding your body higher quality food can drastically change your condition. It has been a couple of months, and the Llasa is almost unrecognizable. I truly believe that feeding dogs commercially prepared dog foods leads to many ailments down the road. No human doctor would prescribe eating Total cereal, and a multivitamin to obtain optimum or even mediocre health. I don’t know why people think it is any different for animals and kibble (even high quality ones).
This post totally cracked me up! Mainly because I have been thinking of making little pup treats for 2 weeks now. I’ve been hooked on Diane’s Gingie cookies (see OvenHug for the best gingie recipe eh=vah) and making them non-stop. Our finicky little chihuahua mix loves sharing bites with me. I want to make a gluten free version of my gingies so that our senior pup, Oscar can also join us – he has sensitive tummy issues. I just need to find a bone shaped cookie cutter and we’re in business. Thanks for the laughs. Your pup cookies look amazin’! Thanks for sharing. xo
I cook for our dogs. We have a 13 year old standard poodle, a yellow lab who is 14 and 2 toy rat terriers. The poodle was seriously sick about a month ago. We did not get a specific diagnosis but he had fever of 107 he did not perk his ears, wag his tail, his rear legs could barely hold him up to pee. He had to be carried out and back in. The only thing he would eat was baked chicken thighs. Now he is back to normal and the lab is sick. Today she was able to get up without assistance one time and twice she was able to get up the 4 steps to the porch. There has been about 2 weeks that she could not get up without assistance She has not had the high fever and both have an occasional huffy cough.
My dogs used to love all of the soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits flavors. They were easy to break up into soft bits that my tiny and toothless dogs could eat. Around the fall of 2018, I noticed that the treats were arriving hard and not chewy. I assumed they were stale, but after trying more bags, I realized that the company has changed them. They should not label them as soft and chewy anymore. Also, the bags also used to state that the treats are "grain-free", while wheat flour was the 2nd ingredient on the bag! They have removed that claim from the bags, but it made me wonder about the company's awareness of their product, if they have made multiple mistakes in regards to claims and labeling. I've found another truly soft treat here on Amazon that my dogs prefer, and are able to eat.

I went online for advice about my dogs having a touch of the runs to be blunt and it seemed many said at first try changing to a bland diet of rice and chicken then I went looking for recipes for homemade dog food and found myself here and can honestly say I will never buy dog food from the store again and sure for just sake of a little time my dogs eat healthier and have a noticeable change in just one week and I reckon cost less to feed which I would pay more anyway if I thought it was good for them.


Quick question…. I’m considering switching to homemade food for my dogs – one is a senior and one is moderately overweight – so I’m just trying to learn as much as I can. I notice there are certain ingredients listed in the Nutritional Guidelines for Calcium and Fatty Acids but none of the recipes include these things. Are these added as needed or should be part of each recipe? BTW…thank you for the great article and recipe ideas!
When is the last time you ever saw a Boston Terrier chasing down a cow to eat it? That doesn’t seem very natural or true to wild behaviors to me. Animals in the wild eat other wild animals who have been eating natural diets, kept in natural conditions, and are not exposed to man made drugs, hormones, chemicals, vaccines, and antibiotics. So to argue for a diet heavy in proteins that a dog would never eat on its own as being better than the recipes here seems unbalanced and not looking at the whole picture.
- Exclusions: ORIJEN, ACANA, over-the-counter Flea & Tick products for dogs and cats; select Pet Pharmacy brands (Bravecto, Tri-Heart Plus, Optimmune, Vetsulin, Salix, Incurin, Mometamax, Panacur, Otomax & Orbax); WholeHearted Memberships, add-on items, out-of-stock items, Donations, Petco Gift Cards and eGift Cards; and applicable taxes. Additional exclusions may apply and will be noted on the Product Detail page and/or Shopping Cart.
When your pooch refuses to eat commercial dog food, be it dry or canned, then sooner or later you might be faced with a problem: you won't have any prepared DIY homemade dog food meals on hand (due to lack of time or whatnot) at home and your canine may be refusing to eat anything else. Fortunately, this is relatively easy to avoid by feeding your dog some commercial dog food from time to time from an early age.
Meet the Buddy Biscuits Family Simple, Crunchy Goodness - Born in 1999, I soon set the standard for oven baked dog treats. With simple ingredients, mouth-watering flavor and a satisfying crunch, I am still a favorite of dogs near and far. Soft & delicious, naturally! The soft texture of these mouth-watering treats makes them perfect for our four-legged friends who prefer a soft treat. We packed them with flavor and simple ingredients, so you’ll love them as much as your dog does. Function meets Delicious - Buddy Boosters offer a boost of glucosamine and chondroitin in every piece and Buddy Trainers are the perfect size for training your pup. These low calorie chews are oven baked and have a delicious soft texture. Naturally Purrr-fect Cat Treats! Our cat treats are made from the quality ingredients you want for your cat, like real meat and wholesome vegetables, with no grains or artificial flavors. SNUGGLEOFFOLOUS - So amazing that we had to create a new word to describe how soft, fluffy, snuggly, and wonderful smelling your dog will be after using our grooming products.

My dogs used to love all of the soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits flavors. They were easy to break up into soft bits that my tiny and toothless dogs could eat. Around the fall of 2018, I noticed that the treats were arriving hard and not chewy. I assumed they were stale, but after trying more bags, I realized that the company has changed them. They should not label them as soft and chewy anymore. Also, the bags also used to state that the treats are "grain-free", while wheat flour was the 2nd ingredient on the bag! They have removed that claim from the bags, but it made me wonder about the company's awareness of their product, if they have made multiple mistakes in regards to claims and labeling. I've found another truly soft treat here on Amazon that my dogs prefer, and are able to eat.
I love this list! First time making dog treats, didn’t have all the ingredients for one recipe so I used this as inspiration. I used peanut butter, eggs, flour, honey, and vegetable broth to make soft, chewy dog biscuits and used a heart cookie cutter. My pugs & chihuahua, and my boyfriend’s goldens loved em! Even tried one myself heheh – turned out like lightly sweetened peanut butter cookies.
It’s Earth Day — or Earth Month, as we prefer! — so naturally, we’re turning our focus to the kitchen. And specifically ways we can create less waste and be more efficient and thoughtful with our output. Between packaging and food scraps, some degree of kitchen waste feels inevitable. For most, there’s no way to eliminate it entirely, but there are a lot of small and easy ways to limit the amount of waste coming out of our kitchens.
I don’t give her dog treats. She gets carrots, watermelon, celery (doesn’t like celery too much), and once in a while a smear of natural peanut butter on a carrot. I pretty much cook for her like the recipes in this article. No flour though. And no seasoning of any kind. When she gets an occasional upset stomach, I give here white rice and chicken only.
- Exclusions: ORIJEN, ACANA, Taste of the Wild, Hill's Pet Nutrition food and treats (Hill's Prescription Diet, Hill's Science Diet, Hill's Ideal Balance and Hill's Bioactive Recipe); Purina brands (Pro Plan, Muse, Beyond and Tidy Cats); Petsafe Brands (PetSafe, SportDOG, Frolicat, Drinkwell, Solvit', ScoopFree, Pet Loo, Gentle Leader, Mr. Herzher's and Piddle Place); Educator E-Collars; Playology; Dollar per Gallon tanks, 50% off or more tanks; select Precious Cat litter products; select Zilla Critter Cages; WholeHearted Memberships, Repeat Delivery orders and subscriptions; out-of-stock items, prior purchases, Donations, Petco Gift Cards and eGift Cards.
I would love to make these for my dogs! We feed our dogs a raw diet, but unfortunately our Miniature Schnauzer ended up getting pancreatitis (they are prone to it) because of too much fat in his diet. Now, he’s still on raw – just a lower fat diet, but we can’t give him any treats like this anymore – no matter how awesome they sound. Our other dog would LOVE these though. 😉
However, homemade dog food isn’t risk-free either. A 2013 study by the Journal of the American Veterinary Association from a while back showed that more than 90% of homemade dog food recipes found online may be bad for your dog. The study went over 200 recipes from reputable veterinary textbooks and certified veterinary nutritionists, as well as other pet-related sources, and of the 200 recipes, 191 weren’t up to par with the Association’s standards. That’s ~96%!
The safety and effectiveness of a raw food diet is still a point of contention among veterinary professionals. Walkerville Vet recommends the best of both worlds. This recipe is based on the raw food diet of wolves, your dog's natural ancestors. however, it also takes into account the dietary changes in domesticated dogs. It has raw meat as well as cooked carbohydrates and vegetables.
- Exclusions: ORIJEN, ACANA, over-the-counter Flea & Tick products for dogs and cats; select Pet Pharmacy brands (Bravecto, Tri-Heart Plus, Optimmune, Vetsulin, Salix, Incurin, Mometamax, Panacur, Otomax & Orbax); WholeHearted Memberships, add-on items, out-of-stock items, Donations, Petco Gift Cards and eGift Cards; and applicable taxes. Additional exclusions may apply and will be noted on the Product Detail page and/or Shopping Cart.
I have 3 dogs, a border collie, poodle mix and a daschund. They get along very well and we take them daily for at least an hour and 1/2 walk. Lately though, the two smaller ones refuse to eat at their normal feeding time. Dennis, the collie, happily eats, but Teddy and Murdog shiver and hide. I work from home and make their gravy from fresh veg. We spend plenty time together and they are loved and very well taken care of. Why have the little ones behaviour changed so drastically in such a short time?
“In 2015, the World Health Organization found that processed meats such as bacon and sausage were known carcinogens linked to cancer. Bacon is an incredibly rich and fatty food with a high salt content, which can prove to be too much for a dog’s stomach to handle. Eating a large amount can cause pancreatitis, which can be fatal.” [http://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/natural-foods/can-dogs-eat-pork/]”
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