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If your fur baby has a sweet tooth he will love these chews, and oatmeal adds protein and is good for digestion. To make these chewy treats, puree 1/4 C. diced peaches, 1 tbsp. canola oil, 1 tbsp. molasses, 1/4 tsp. vanilla and 1/8 C. water. Combine the puree with 2 C. rolled oats, 1/2 C. water, 1 C. flour and 1 tsp. cinnamon. Scoop spoon-sized dollops on to a lightly greased baking sheet, press them flat with the back of the spoon, and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes. These chewy cookie treats can be stored for two weeks in the refrigerator or six months in the freezer.

My little dog is 8 years old I have had her for about 2 months she is a rescue dog, we have bonded very much and she is health. A few days ago she stopped eating I have tried changing her dog food but she will have nothing to do with it and I have tried to give her chicken and hamburger but she wont eat that either. What should I do? Help I am getting very worried about. Thanks for your help.
Prevent unhealthy additives. Many brands of commercial dog treats are filled with preservatives, which help to extend their shelf life. In addition, store bought treats are often made from fillers and byproducts as opposed to natural and high quality ingredients. By creating your own treats at home, you will be able to provide your dog with a healthy snack that is not only nutritious but is also free of unhealthy additives.
When do dogs live for 14 years in the wild? Cooking meat kills pathogens found in nature, as well as in your favorite grocery store or your favorite butcher. It also kills a few vitamins, but not so many as to cause a problem if you get all the ingredients correct. I don’t trust recipes from amateurs, most of them prove themselves inadequate to the job by anyone with some basic knowledge. I particularly don’t trust rice because of it’s arsenic content (read Consumer Reports, unless you are skeptical about education).

Also, avoiding any organ meat (like liver or heart) in DIY homemade dog food meals because it looks inedible to us is another big mistake. If this happens every once in a while, that won’t be a problem, so don’t throw away the most recent batch you've just made simply because you forgot a piece of liver. However, doing this systemically can lead to a lot of deficiencies and health issues for your dog, according to studies.


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Dog Treat Dough - One thing that you need to consider when choosing cutters is the thickness of your dough. If it contains rolled oats, carob chips, or another chunky ingredient, you want to use very simple shaped cutters like hearts or circles. If your dough is simple and has smooth ingredients, like the turkey wheat free dog treats, you can use shapes that have more detail since the detail will be evident after the biscuits are baked.
I would love to make these for my dogs! We feed our dogs a raw diet, but unfortunately our Miniature Schnauzer ended up getting pancreatitis (they are prone to it) because of too much fat in his diet. Now, he’s still on raw – just a lower fat diet, but we can’t give him any treats like this anymore – no matter how awesome they sound. Our other dog would LOVE these though. 😉
In the past food was left out for them and some would be thrown out next morning which I assumed was a sign they were getting plenty but now they clean everything up and show like I said a remarkable change the youngest is a 3-year-old little cross Jack Russel/Shitzu and she has always had coarse hair and I would say a thin frame but never looked starving just excepted as being small framed she now has a smooth coat and apart from her name “spud” as she looked like a baked potato with a tail ( I wanted to call her Gizmo after the gremlin with her satellite dish ears) when we got her as a rescue pup you would not believe its the same dog, she was always happy with a none stop wagging tail and looked healthy but she looks so much healthier and both of them seem different in themselves in a way I can’t explain but for the better.

You’ve been at this “business” a while and it would seem you have heard everything under the sun. As I read your comments above, I noticed how patient and kind you are with each person who comments, even if you’ve said the same thing a hundred times, lol. I’m in marketing, and I’m sure you’ve heard this before, but just wanted to point out that your heading and claim could be considered confusing. I landed on your page following a link, “25 Simple Dog Treat Recipes: 5 Ingredients or less.” When I arrived on your page, the heading said “23 Simple Dog Treat Recipes: 5 Ingredients or less.” Perhaps most people wouldn’t notice that the information doesn’t match, but being a person of integrity, I thought you would want to be aware, so you could adjust the Headline to match the claim. Thank you for caring for those furry friends we love so much!
Originally from Chicago, Nicole Janiga joined the Chewy team as a marketing intern in January 2017. Since then, Nicole has continued writing and photographing for Chewy as a Content Collaborator while completing her education at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business. She is majoring in both marketing and corporate innovation, before returning to Chewy as a Marketing Analyst. In her free time, Nicole enjoys traveling, riding her horse or snuggling up with her Pug, @zoetheloaf, and Terrier, Cozmo.  
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