Hi I am new to this site and have an Anatolian Sheperd and a Heinz 57 that I am going to start supplementing their kibble with your great recipes. I have a question on the yogurt and since I know it is a great probiotic how is it that dogs can eat it and not have digestive issues since it is dairy? My big guy weighs about 110 lbs and the gal about 60. She can eat anything he has a sensitive gut and I have been told a little yogurt wil help. Thanks
5% Auto Ship - Sign up for Auto Ship and have products conveniently delivered to you at the frequency you choose! Save 5% on your initial order and 5% on recurring orders. Plus enjoy free shipping on orders over $49. Discounts will automatically apply at checkout once the customer has enrolled. Maximum value $150. Offer not valid on gift cards, gift certificates, previous purchases, or charitable donations and may not be valid on all merchandise. Offer may not be combined with other promotional offers or discounts. Terms and conditions of this offer are subject to change at the sole discretion of PetSmart.
Deviled eggs are one of the most universally loved apps and snacks. Put a plate down at any holiday get-together or gathering and it’s all but guaranteed they’ll be gobbled up in no time. I’m a purist at heart who believes you can never go wrong with the classic creamy, mustard-spiked filling, although there’s a nearly endless variety of ways to dress up and reinvent these two-bite snacks. Here are 10 of our favorite deviled recipe ideas to consider.

I have 3 dogs, a border collie, poodle mix and a daschund. They get along very well and we take them daily for at least an hour and 1/2 walk. Lately though, the two smaller ones refuse to eat at their normal feeding time. Dennis, the collie, happily eats, but Teddy and Murdog shiver and hide. I work from home and make their gravy from fresh veg. We spend plenty time together and they are loved and very well taken care of. Why have the little ones behaviour changed so drastically in such a short time?
I’m assuming you are changing over to a homemade diet because you have health concerns related to commercially produced dog food. Please research the contents of ALL commercial foods. You will be appalled. It ranges in offensiveness from low quality, to poisonous and downright carcinogenic. Proteins are frequently comprised of beaks, feathers, and high temperature steamed bonemeal. The most common source of “animal protein” is actually a meal that is produced using euthanized, ill farm and COMPANION animals…..as well as the medications that were in their systems when they were eventually determined to be terminal. There are a multitude of articles online with which you can educate yourself about the heinous nature of commercial dog food (yes, even the “premium” foods) so I guess the short answer is…..NO, if you care about what your dog is eating, don’t feed anything that you purchase human grade ingredients and prepare yourself! Btw, organic is best if you can afford it. The chemicals in human food are just as detrimental to your dog as they are for you, although having a shorter lifespan, they obviously won’t suffer some of the cumulative affects that humans do.
The safety and effectiveness of a raw food diet is still a point of contention among veterinary professionals. Walkerville Vet recommends the best of both worlds. This recipe is based on the raw food diet of wolves, your dog's natural ancestors. however, it also takes into account the dietary changes in domesticated dogs. It has raw meat as well as cooked carbohydrates and vegetables.
Hi Kathy! I believe there was a link toward the beginning of the article but, for a puppy, the general rule (from what I understand) is 1/2 a cup for every 5 pounds of weight. So, if your pup weighs 15 pounds, you’d feed it 1 1/2 cups a day, ideally splitting it into three servings (most commonly 7am, 12pm, and 5pm) of 1/2 a cup. I hope I helped you out a bit!

Interesting, my vet didn’t recommend Hill’s to us but I believe you. Now understanding the point made, I agree with you Twyla. If a dog food isn’t working for your dog and you’ve introduced it to them slowly then changing food is a good idea. As you said, homemade food is a good option as well as organic. In the end, each dog is different so you’ll need to play around with it until you find a healthy balance for your dog. Thanks for the comment and input Twyla!
Their health has improved visibly. The one that was prone to overweight slimmed right down. The one that was picky is now a chow hound. And best of all the one that had quit eating and was at death’s door is still with us – she was the original inspiration to start cooking. I vary the protein, the grains, and the veggies but the basic recipe holds. I’ll never go back to that canned slop!
Awesome recipes! Our yellow lab loves the turkey/rice/veggie mix and the chicken jerky strips! Was surprised that our dog loved the rosemary spice in the turkey recipe. Just made the beef/rice meal in the crock pot yesterday and it passed the taste test! Thank you for sharing these great nutritious recipes. Our lab has a lot of energy with these well rounded recipes!

I love this list! First time making dog treats, didn’t have all the ingredients for one recipe so I used this as inspiration. I used peanut butter, eggs, flour, honey, and vegetable broth to make soft, chewy dog biscuits and used a heart cookie cutter. My pugs & chihuahua, and my boyfriend’s goldens loved em! Even tried one myself heheh – turned out like lightly sweetened peanut butter cookies.
An important part of my dog’s diet is the kefir course, which she gets in the morning. The probiotic is important. It is homemade kefir with ground flax seed a little raw oats, and either flax or coconut oil. After that she gets a bowl of chicken or fish or leftover meat from my son’s unfinished meals, dal (chana or split peas or lentils) cooked with quinoa or rice (occasionally) or raw oats with veggies like carrots, small potatoescelery, yams or squash or even blueberries. Long ago with other dogs i fed raw lamb when i first read about homemade dog meals, but it is pricey now.I add greens to the stew but often she removes. Therefore i always add wheatgrass power. She gets oil or butter with every bowl of food, feeding the dal/rice/meat dish 2x day. She also gets vinegar in the dal along with indian spices and garlic. Some day yea some nay on garlic but i thing it is good. No onions or avocados. No chocolate or pizza or pasta. She gets the vinegar to help with itchy skin. The fish is generally raw or lightly poached. Their stomachs were designed to be able to handle raw meat. Sometimes she gets eggs lightly cooked, on the loose runny side. I add good homemade bone broths when cooking dal. I add liverwurst to pigs ears for snackage. I also add iodine drops to her water, which is never tap, except when in the park. I am in search of a non rip off vitamin and appreciate others’ comments herein regarding vitamins. And i always examine her . Not saying perfect but better than the hell of neverending kibble. Sometimes i give her a handful of kibble as a snack. Good to keep a small bag of good stuff for emergencies.
I cook for our dogs. We have a 13 year old standard poodle, a yellow lab who is 14 and 2 toy rat terriers. The poodle was seriously sick about a month ago. We did not get a specific diagnosis but he had fever of 107 he did not perk his ears, wag his tail, his rear legs could barely hold him up to pee. He had to be carried out and back in. The only thing he would eat was baked chicken thighs. Now he is back to normal and the lab is sick. Today she was able to get up without assistance one time and twice she was able to get up the 4 steps to the porch. There has been about 2 weeks that she could not get up without assistance She has not had the high fever and both have an occasional huffy cough.

Thankfully, Sage doesn’t have any special allergies or dietary needs, so there’s really no reason for me to make her homemade dog treats other than the fact that I love her something fierce and needed a break from cookies for a minute. But conveniently, this homemade dog treats recipe makes a TON and we know lots of other neighbor-ly dogs who can and will appreciate a little gift bag of soft-baked, peanut butter and bacon glazed homemade dog treats.
One of my three dogs has a very sensitive stomach, so I’ve taken over making meals for him. My typical recipe follows most closely to the beef dinner recipe below. I combine three pounds of 90 percent lean ground beef, frozen peas, and chicken broth in an Instant Pot LUX80 and put it on the Meat/Stew setting for one hour. Separately, I prepare two dry cups of Jasmine rice.
my dogs eat Merrick freeze dried bits with kibble and then organic wet dog food and i change it every other day and noticed they have diarrhea so i called their vet and she said i need to feed them white rice and chicken until it gets solid again. well today it looks more solid but i know they wont go back to what i was feeding them so how can i add in the healthy beneficial foods to their diet without hurting their tummies again.
my dogs eat Merrick freeze dried bits with kibble and then organic wet dog food and i change it every other day and noticed they have diarrhea so i called their vet and she said i need to feed them white rice and chicken until it gets solid again. well today it looks more solid but i know they wont go back to what i was feeding them so how can i add in the healthy beneficial foods to their diet without hurting their tummies again.
Even if you’ve never baked a thing in your life you can make these simple dog treat recipes. It’s hard to go wrong with five ingredients or less, and there’s comfort to be found in knowing exactly what’s going into your dog’s food. I make homemade dog treats when we’re working on any new training behaviors – the extra focus they bring is priceless.
×