Interesting, my vet didn’t recommend Hill’s to us but I believe you. Now understanding the point made, I agree with you Twyla. If a dog food isn’t working for your dog and you’ve introduced it to them slowly then changing food is a good idea. As you said, homemade food is a good option as well as organic. In the end, each dog is different so you’ll need to play around with it until you find a healthy balance for your dog. Thanks for the comment and input Twyla!
I make food for my three dogs… The recipe is 1.5 cups of brown rice, 1.5 cups of brown lentils cooked in the instant pot for 23 minutes with 6 cups of broth and 3 sweet potatoes and a half cup of bone meal. Then I cook and food process 8 pounds of chicken or ham. Blend both parts together and refrigerate. I vary the meat from week to week as well as the veggies.
Lifting the Cut Outs - Once you have cut out as many dog biscuits as you can, it's time to transfer the cookies to the baking sheet. Start by pulling away the excess dough from around the cut outs. Place the unused dough back into your bowl to be rolled out. Gently lift the cookie away from the parchment paper or flour covered surface with a metal or thin spatula.
Many good ideas here, however, I am absolutely appalled that you would suggest a dog eat dairy. A does not suckle a cow, a calf does. Dogs should also not be fed grains “as their ancestors did”. Wolves do not and have not ever eaten grains and as they made the transition to an omnivorous diet, still have never eaten grains. Dogs should ONLY be fed meat and vegetables, and fruit is also okay. Please correct this on your website as soon as possible so avoid giving false information to dog owners and potentially damaging their canines health.

my dogs eat Merrick freeze dried bits with kibble and then organic wet dog food and i change it every other day and noticed they have diarrhea so i called their vet and she said i need to feed them white rice and chicken until it gets solid again. well today it looks more solid but i know they wont go back to what i was feeding them so how can i add in the healthy beneficial foods to their diet without hurting their tummies again.
Meet my new favorite brunch dish: Hawaiian Roll Egg-in-a Hole. You might be familiar with egg-in-a-hole as a beloved childhood breakfast dish, but this version is easier to cook for a crowd, and delivers big on flavor. Serve this egg bake for family brunch, or whip it up when you’re feeding a hungry crowd. Here are my tricks for nailing it every time. At first glance, this recipe is pretty straightforward: Make a well in each roll, crack in an egg, and bake!
The no avocado myth has been debunked. It is safe to feed your dog avocado fruits but not the stem, pits or leaves. They often misinform people about Fat content in avocados claiming that it can lead to pancreatitis in dogs, this is partly true because only cooked fats do lead to pancreatitis. Loads of research has been done and the results have time and time again debunked this. here is one of many articles: https://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2018/08/23/sniffer-dogs-help-save-avocado-industry.aspx
I would love to make these for my dogs! We feed our dogs a raw diet, but unfortunately our Miniature Schnauzer ended up getting pancreatitis (they are prone to it) because of too much fat in his diet. Now, he’s still on raw – just a lower fat diet, but we can’t give him any treats like this anymore – no matter how awesome they sound. Our other dog would LOVE these though. 😉

One of the pleasures of cooking a ham for a large gathering, obviously outside of eating it, is that the city hams we glaze and bake for holidays are already cooked. This should take the guesswork out of cooking a ham at home, right? But because most hams are quite large and have spiral cuts and giant bones to contend with, it can be hard to tell when a ham is actually “done” cooking. Here’s everything you need to know about ham temperatures for reheating and serving.
My daughter volunteers at a dog rescue and we want to make several different batches and bring them to share in celebrating her birthday in a couple months. I LOVE the variety of recipes and especially ones for those dogs with grain allergies or that are diabetic! My question is, will the treats still be good if we make ahead of time and freeze them until closer to the big day? Sadly, I’m not much of a cook so I am not familiar with what freezes well and what wouldn’t.
Hi I currently have a 14 year old Kelpie x Border Collie. She is Currently 35kg but she needs to be 28kg for her size. she currently has bad arthritis and her weight is affecting her and causing more pain and less movement and it’s hard to watch. Iv’e tried all shop bought diets but there full of grains and because shes in pain she moves as little as possible and the weight remains. I want to try making it myself but i’m not sure how much to feed her, any help would be appreciated. Thank you
Also, the things you said about a raw diet is 100% false. The AVMA may not be behind it but there are many vets that advocate a raw diet. I have been feeding my dog a PMR (prey model raw) diet for a year and just started my 7 month old pup on it and they’ve never been healthier. If you’re clean and sanitary in your meat handling and clean up, like you would be if it were for your own consumption, it’s completely safe.

If your fur baby has a sweet tooth he will love these chews, and oatmeal adds protein and is good for digestion. To make these chewy treats, puree 1/4 C. diced peaches, 1 tbsp. canola oil, 1 tbsp. molasses, 1/4 tsp. vanilla and 1/8 C. water. Combine the puree with 2 C. rolled oats, 1/2 C. water, 1 C. flour and 1 tsp. cinnamon. Scoop spoon-sized dollops on to a lightly greased baking sheet, press them flat with the back of the spoon, and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes. These chewy cookie treats can be stored for two weeks in the refrigerator or six months in the freezer.

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