I love this list! First time making dog treats, didn’t have all the ingredients for one recipe so I used this as inspiration. I used peanut butter, eggs, flour, honey, and vegetable broth to make soft, chewy dog biscuits and used a heart cookie cutter. My pugs & chihuahua, and my boyfriend’s goldens loved em! Even tried one myself heheh – turned out like lightly sweetened peanut butter cookies.
Hi I hope your dog is eating now but if not I have a recommendation for you, my 8 month puppy stop eating kibble so I started cooking for him, this is my first dog so I don’t have so much experience. Weel after some months eating cook chicken with vegetables and other snacks he stopped eating again I think he got bored (again) so I bought greek gods greek yogurt (plain) and he love his food again, maybe you can try something like this.
Lifting the Cut Outs - Once you have cut out as many dog biscuits as you can, it's time to transfer the cookies to the baking sheet. Start by pulling away the excess dough from around the cut outs. Place the unused dough back into your bowl to be rolled out. Gently lift the cookie away from the parchment paper or flour covered surface with a metal or thin spatula.
When preparing homemade dog treats, make sure you take into account any allergies that your pet has to specific ingredients. You will want to avoid adding any ingredient that you know that your pet has reacted poorly to in the past. If you are experimenting with new flavors, feed the treat to your dog in a small amount to see how he reacts to it before distributing an entire treat. Store your homemade dog treats in an airtight container and place them in the freezer. Allow the treat to thaw for 10 – 20 minutes prior to serving to your dog. Treats can last for up to 6 months in the freezer.
Hi…I just recently started making my own wet food to add to the grain free kibble for my dogs. My older dog seems to have a definite allergy to wheat. We adopted a new dog and in my effort to entice him to eat, I introduced him to a regular wet food with his kibble and let my older one have some as well. Within 2 months, we noticed that he was showing signs of atopic dermititus around his eyes. So now I am making their food with ground turkey, kidney beans, peas, carrots and brown rice and adding some fish oil once it is cooked. Within a week, we are seeing an great improvement to his eyes…plus, they love it! Less expensive than anything from the store!
​This is a different type of recipe, in fact there's no real recipe here at all. This is more instruction on how to construct your own recipe using optimal ingredients for a properly nutrtionally balanced meal. They have sources several scientific studies and even vet endorsed sample diets in order to give you a better idea of what's suitable for your dog - a highly recommend you give this a read.

It isn’t uncommon for a dog owner to decide to make homemade dog food. Whether you just want to save money or you want to make sure that you know what type of ingredients are going into your dog’s meals, it isn’t that difficult to do. The most important thing is to make sure they get foods that contain protein, calcium and other nutrients they need for energy.
I just started making food for my 10 yr. old lab. Here goes: 2 lbs hamburger 1 lb chicken hearts and gizzards, 1/2 lb beef liver, 8 cups brown rice, large can of collard greens, small can of pumpkin, small can of peas and carrots, 1/2 cup blueberries. I chop up the liverand gizzards. Put it all in 16 cups of water and boli for 20 minutes. I vary the veggies and fruit. She weighs about 90 lbs and needs to lose weight so I feed her 2 lbs a day. I add chia seeds when feeding. 21/4 t a day. She was a picky eater before so she got way too many human food treats. Now she gobbles down her food and no more begging. Just started so I might have to adjust her serving size.
Hello! I am BRAND new to this and just want to make sure I don’t miss any nutrients my babies need!! I have 2 mini dachshunds and a foster chihuaha, are there any recipes specific for tiny babies? Also, I read something about determining how much of what goes in by their weight. Anyone know HOW to do that/what the equation for that is (Example:weight-10lbs:__×10÷__=
I’ve raised my Shih Tzu since he was 10 weeks old, and he is currently 3 years old. Everyday he eats a different fruit/vegetable, typically with chicken, but he also occasionally he eats salmon, beef, pork (very sparingly since it can cause worms), and turkey. He also eats lentils, rice, beans, and oatmeal. I also add eggshell powder, nutritional yeast, Vitamin C, a small amount of garlic, and fish oil to their food. Variety is good — they need it to get proper nutrition. I’ve never had any dietary problems with him, his skin is healthy and he is energetic. I recently adopted a 8 yr old Llasa Aapso who was religiously fed so called high quality grain free kibble his entire life (I know this because I am related to the prior owner). He developed chronically itchy skin (with blisters and black scar tissue from scratching), and his owners did not know what to do with him. I immediately switched him over to a home made diet (like my Shih Tzu) and he immediately improved. I did give him the anti-fungal, anti-bacterial medication and prednisone the vet prescribed to initially improve (but not get rid of) his skin condition. The vet wanted me to give him the prescription diet and cortisone shots to keep the condition at bay. However, I refused because I know personally based on my own diet changes (I used to be 100+ pounds overweight and I lost it by eating better—not less— food) how feeding your body higher quality food can drastically change your condition. It has been a couple of months, and the Llasa is almost unrecognizable. I truly believe that feeding dogs commercially prepared dog foods leads to many ailments down the road. No human doctor would prescribe eating Total cereal, and a multivitamin to obtain optimum or even mediocre health. I don’t know why people think it is any different for animals and kibble (even high quality ones).
This Easter we were gifted a 22-pound ham (!!!) and while we had our share of Easter feasts, we’ve still got a decent amount left over. I’m not even a little bit mad, because I know I can freeze some for future use and that there are plenty of ways — big and small — that we can use it up this week. Here are 17 of my favorite recipes for using up leftover ham. City hams freeze incredibly well. My suggestion? Freeze the ham in different forms for future use.
The no avocado myth has been debunked. It is safe to feed your dog avocado fruits but not the stem, pits or leaves. They often misinform people about Fat content in avocados claiming that it can lead to pancreatitis in dogs, this is partly true because only cooked fats do lead to pancreatitis. Loads of research has been done and the results have time and time again debunked this. here is one of many articles: https://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2018/08/23/sniffer-dogs-help-save-avocado-industry.aspx
From fetching his favorite ball to successfully sitting on command, your dog deserves delicious and healthy dog treats. In addition to your verbal praise and affection, there's nothing your dog enjoys more than some mouth-watering rawhide bones or crunchy training treats. Having a natural inclination to please, dogs love to be praised, which is why it's important that they be rewarded with healthy dog biscuits. Healthy dog treats can also add variety to your dog's diet. And because peanut butter dog treats are a fan favorite, they are often available in varieties that provide additional nutritional support under the cloak of their delicious flavor. There are treats enriched with glucosamine to promote better hip and joint health, wheat-grass for better digestion, and more. For dogs with allergies, there are hypoallergenic organic dog treats that are wheat, gluten and corn-free, and even low-calorie treats for less active dogs.
Thank you to the readers who have mentioned the issue with using bacon fat for dogs. A trace amount of bacon grease (two tablespoons divided amongst 30 biscuits = less than 1 gram of bacon fat per serving) shouldn’t be a concern. Of course, we’re not veterinarians over here, so please check with your vet or use an alternative type of oil if you are concerned.
I don’t give her dog treats. She gets carrots, watermelon, celery (doesn’t like celery too much), and once in a while a smear of natural peanut butter on a carrot. I pretty much cook for her like the recipes in this article. No flour though. And no seasoning of any kind. When she gets an occasional upset stomach, I give here white rice and chicken only.

I don’t give her dog treats. She gets carrots, watermelon, celery (doesn’t like celery too much), and once in a while a smear of natural peanut butter on a carrot. I pretty much cook for her like the recipes in this article. No flour though. And no seasoning of any kind. When she gets an occasional upset stomach, I give here white rice and chicken only.

Hi Audra, in step 5 it says to slowly add the water in. You reserve some of the rice mixture to be used as topping for the cookies at the end. As for it saying egg(s) that was a typo, our apologies, we’ll be sure to fix that. It says it makes 24 1-oz balls to give you an idea that you will get 24 oz of these treats. However, everyone has different size cookie sheets and desired thickness so saying you’ll get 24 treats isn’t very clear because some people may make the treats larger or smaller than others. Sorry this was confusing for you, I hope that clears some of the confusion up. Please let me know if I can help any further.
Thankfully, Sage doesn’t have any special allergies or dietary needs, so there’s really no reason for me to make her homemade dog treats other than the fact that I love her something fierce and needed a break from cookies for a minute. But conveniently, this homemade dog treats recipe makes a TON and we know lots of other neighbor-ly dogs who can and will appreciate a little gift bag of soft-baked, peanut butter and bacon glazed homemade dog treats.
Quick question…. I’m considering switching to homemade food for my dogs – one is a senior and one is moderately overweight – so I’m just trying to learn as much as I can. I notice there are certain ingredients listed in the Nutritional Guidelines for Calcium and Fatty Acids but none of the recipes include these things. Are these added as needed or should be part of each recipe? BTW…thank you for the great article and recipe ideas!
Welcome to Next Week’s Meal Plan! I want to help you find inspiration and ease some of the pain points that come with getting dinner on the table night after night, whether you’re cooking for one or a family of eight. That’s why, as promised, this series is shifting — every week I’ll be answering reader requests and sharing meal plans that you want to see.It’s not too late! What type of meal plans would you like to see?
I was wondering about how much to feed my dog. The problem is I see things listing Giant Breeds as 75-100 pounds but my actually Giant of a dog is 165. I would like to transition him to a cooked diet but I don’t want to under or over feed him based on doing the math wrong. Do you have any charts or resources that can help me with an actual giant dog? This would hopefully include both food and vitamins.

While DIY dog food recipes can be fun to make and a healthy alternative to consuming canned food or kibble, they may still lack all the essential minerals and vitamins needed. So in addition to PetPlate, we encourage you to check out these other dog food delivery options that are specially formulated by dog nutritionists and shipped directly to you for your pup to enjoy.

Hi I currently have a 14 year old Kelpie x Border Collie. She is Currently 35kg but she needs to be 28kg for her size. she currently has bad arthritis and her weight is affecting her and causing more pain and less movement and it’s hard to watch. Iv’e tried all shop bought diets but there full of grains and because shes in pain she moves as little as possible and the weight remains. I want to try making it myself but i’m not sure how much to feed her, any help would be appreciated. Thank you
Hello! I am BRAND new to this and just want to make sure I don’t miss any nutrients my babies need!! I have 2 mini dachshunds and a foster chihuaha, are there any recipes specific for tiny babies? Also, I read something about determining how much of what goes in by their weight. Anyone know HOW to do that/what the equation for that is (Example:weight-10lbs:__×10÷__=
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When preparing DIY homemade dog food, it's likely you'll be making large quantities of it. After all, you don’t want to cook it every day. However, with the larger quantities come some potential storage problems. And not storing your pet's food properly in a special dog food storage container or fridge, not freezing when needed, is about as dangerous as not storing your own food in an adequate way.
Interesting, my vet didn’t recommend Hill’s to us but I believe you. Now understanding the point made, I agree with you Twyla. If a dog food isn’t working for your dog and you’ve introduced it to them slowly then changing food is a good idea. As you said, homemade food is a good option as well as organic. In the end, each dog is different so you’ll need to play around with it until you find a healthy balance for your dog. Thanks for the comment and input Twyla!

I have been cooking for our three elderly toy poodles (ages 23, 15, and 15) for a couple of years now, with the vet’s approval and suggestions. I use a pressure cooker set at high for 30 minutes. Combine 2 lbs of ground chicken, 12 oz of raw whole grains (brown rice, steel-cut oatmeal, and/or quinoa) and about a cup of mixed veggies (either diced frozen ones from a bag, or leftovers from our table). Add a tablespoon of sea salt (vet suggested that, for the minerals.) Water to cover in the pot – usually about 8 cups. This makes several days’ worth of dog food; we keep one day’s worth in the fridge and freeze the rest. When we dish it out, we add a powdered supplement recommended by the vet for each dog (one has kidney problems, the other two are just old.)

Kitchn’s Delicious Links column highlights recipes we’re excited about from the bloggers we love. Follow along every weekday as we post our favorites.Flank steak is a great way to mix up proteins during the week, so your dinner isn’t all chicken, every day. It’s a comparatively inexpensive cut of beef, and I find it way easier to cook than chicken, because you don’t need to worry nearly as much about getting the meat to the exact right temperature.
I have been cooking for our three elderly toy poodles (ages 23, 15, and 15) for a couple of years now, with the vet’s approval and suggestions. I use a pressure cooker set at high for 30 minutes. Combine 2 lbs of ground chicken, 12 oz of raw whole grains (brown rice, steel-cut oatmeal, and/or quinoa) and about a cup of mixed veggies (either diced frozen ones from a bag, or leftovers from our table). Add a tablespoon of sea salt (vet suggested that, for the minerals.) Water to cover in the pot – usually about 8 cups. This makes several days’ worth of dog food; we keep one day’s worth in the fridge and freeze the rest. When we dish it out, we add a powdered supplement recommended by the vet for each dog (one has kidney problems, the other two are just old.)
Meet my new favorite brunch dish: Hawaiian Roll Egg-in-a Hole. You might be familiar with egg-in-a-hole as a beloved childhood breakfast dish, but this version is easier to cook for a crowd, and delivers big on flavor. Serve this egg bake for family brunch, or whip it up when you’re feeding a hungry crowd. Here are my tricks for nailing it every time. At first glance, this recipe is pretty straightforward: Make a well in each roll, crack in an egg, and bake!

I take charge and responsibility for my dog. I realize Vets are so called professionals, but my dog is very dear to me. I do what I think is best. And because she has seizures I am researching an opt out for rabies shots. She is healthy, runs like a puppy and since I don’t give her chemicals besides her meds, she seems happier. She was given to me about 7 or 8 years ago so I don’t know her exact age. She is all muscle and strong. I hope this helps someone. Thanks for reading.

It’s also common to find by-products and fillers (check the labels of any treats you might have in the cupboard) in dog biscuits rather than natural, organic or high-quality ingredients. When you make small batches of your own doggie biscuits, there’s no need for extra additives or preservatives, another great reason to tie on an apron and get creative in the kitchen.
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