I have been cooking for our three elderly toy poodles (ages 23, 15, and 15) for a couple of years now, with the vet’s approval and suggestions. I use a pressure cooker set at high for 30 minutes. Combine 2 lbs of ground chicken, 12 oz of raw whole grains (brown rice, steel-cut oatmeal, and/or quinoa) and about a cup of mixed veggies (either diced frozen ones from a bag, or leftovers from our table). Add a tablespoon of sea salt (vet suggested that, for the minerals.) Water to cover in the pot – usually about 8 cups. This makes several days’ worth of dog food; we keep one day’s worth in the fridge and freeze the rest. When we dish it out, we add a powdered supplement recommended by the vet for each dog (one has kidney problems, the other two are just old.)
To those of us who love deviled eggs (and we are legion), there is really no occasion that could not be made better by a platter of eggs stuffed with their own whipped yolks. Maybe that’s Easter lunch, their most native habitat, or a work party where everyone — even the most keto-devout! — can fall upon that plate of little morsels. But what about breakfast? Do deviled eggs belong at breakfast? Oh yes. And I have the recipe to prove it.
From fetching his favorite ball to successfully sitting on command, your dog deserves delicious and healthy dog treats. In addition to your verbal praise and affection, there's nothing your dog enjoys more than some mouth-watering rawhide bones or crunchy training treats. Having a natural inclination to please, dogs love to be praised, which is why it's important that they be rewarded with healthy dog biscuits. Healthy dog treats can also add variety to your dog's diet. And because peanut butter dog treats are a fan favorite, they are often available in varieties that provide additional nutritional support under the cloak of their delicious flavor. There are treats enriched with glucosamine to promote better hip and joint health, wheat-grass for better digestion, and more. For dogs with allergies, there are hypoallergenic organic dog treats that are wheat, gluten and corn-free, and even low-calorie treats for less active dogs.
To be fair, humans do not suckle a cow either but we still eat dairy. 🙂 We have found sources online that say it’s ok to give a dog dairy as long as they’re not lactose intolerant, the same goes for grain. Each dog is unique so it’s important to know what is ok for your dog’s digestive system and to talk to your vet if you have any questions. I know many dogs who have eaten dairy and grain and have been completely fine.
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Meet the Buddy Biscuits Family Simple, Crunchy Goodness - Born in 1999, I soon set the standard for oven baked dog treats. With simple ingredients, mouth-watering flavor and a satisfying crunch, I am still a favorite of dogs near and far. Soft & delicious, naturally! The soft texture of these mouth-watering treats makes them perfect for our four-legged friends who prefer a soft treat. We packed them with flavor and simple ingredients, so you’ll love them as much as your dog does. Function meets Delicious - Buddy Boosters offer a boost of glucosamine and chondroitin in every piece and Buddy Trainers are the perfect size for training your pup. These low calorie chews are oven baked and have a delicious soft texture. Naturally Purrr-fect Cat Treats! Our cat treats are made from the quality ingredients you want for your cat, like real meat and wholesome vegetables, with no grains or artificial flavors. SNUGGLEOFFOLOUS - So amazing that we had to create a new word to describe how soft, fluffy, snuggly, and wonderful smelling your dog will be after using our grooming products.
To those of us who love deviled eggs (and we are legion), there is really no occasion that could not be made better by a platter of eggs stuffed with their own whipped yolks. Maybe that’s Easter lunch, their most native habitat, or a work party where everyone — even the most keto-devout! — can fall upon that plate of little morsels. But what about breakfast? Do deviled eggs belong at breakfast? Oh yes. And I have the recipe to prove it.
When do dogs live for 14 years in the wild? Cooking meat kills pathogens found in nature, as well as in your favorite grocery store or your favorite butcher. It also kills a few vitamins, but not so many as to cause a problem if you get all the ingredients correct. I don’t trust recipes from amateurs, most of them prove themselves inadequate to the job by anyone with some basic knowledge. I particularly don’t trust rice because of it’s arsenic content (read Consumer Reports, unless you are skeptical about education).

I tried to make the Beef Stew and the recipe had me confused (easy to do ). In the listing of ingredients, it says 1/2 cup of flour, and “ 1/2 cup water or organic vegetable oil, plus 1 Tablespoon vegetable oil for frying.” So is that correct? 1/2 cup of water OR 1/2 cup of oil?? Isn’t that kind of a lot of oil? Anyway, I tried the 1/2 cup of water and with 1/2 cup of flour, this became a big ball of yuck. What did I do wrong??
“Prescription diets” like Hills Science Diet and Royal Canine are pretty much a scam. I used to feed it to my dogs who over the years often developed disease such as cancer and other ailments. The state of Ca has sued these companies for false advertising and collusion with certain vet chains where the vets get kick backs for “prescribing” these brands for your sick pets. When examining the ingredients, youll see they can include inferior protien and starch sourses such as corn, and meat byproducts. Plus, as this article explained, kibble itself is a nutritionally compromised food (due to the production method of high heat and extrusion). Sure, its convenient and less work for the human, but over time, will likely be damaging to a dog’s (or cats) organs. Google yourself to research… if you dont know where to start, try Dr Karen Becker, a holistic and traditional vet who provides excellent information and advice on pet food and ailments, weight controll, and prevention. I have been very happy feeding a commercial (Honest Kitchen) nutritionally ballanced dehydrated raw food mixture (add water) with supplimental fresh foods. These recipes sound great too!
No they need vitamins and enzymes, as do most of these home cooked recipes. Digestive enzymes, so go check out the website enzymes and click on Pet’s and talk to your vet about giving a multi vitamin, many will prescribe a child’s vitamin. Your cooking ok but not so much burger. And many dogs allergies stem from food. Try adding in pumpkin purée and some greens no beans! Brown rice not white. Bsrley, peas,sweet potatoes no white potatoes. Poultry chicken and turkey many dogs are allergic to. Even humans need digestive enzymes. Most problems with skin and digestion is because of no enzymes!
It’s Earth Day — or Earth Month, as we prefer! — so naturally, we’re turning our focus to the kitchen. And specifically ways we can create less waste and be more efficient and thoughtful with our output. Between packaging and food scraps, some degree of kitchen waste feels inevitable. For most, there’s no way to eliminate it entirely, but there are a lot of small and easy ways to limit the amount of waste coming out of our kitchens.
If your fur baby has a sweet tooth he will love these chews, and oatmeal adds protein and is good for digestion. To make these chewy treats, puree 1/4 C. diced peaches, 1 tbsp. canola oil, 1 tbsp. molasses, 1/4 tsp. vanilla and 1/8 C. water. Combine the puree with 2 C. rolled oats, 1/2 C. water, 1 C. flour and 1 tsp. cinnamon. Scoop spoon-sized dollops on to a lightly greased baking sheet, press them flat with the back of the spoon, and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes. These chewy cookie treats can be stored for two weeks in the refrigerator or six months in the freezer.
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