Soft & chewy Buddy Biscuits are palatable with no crunch. An excellent choice for all dogs, especially older dogs or smaller dogs who prefer a softer treat. Along with indulging your pup, Buddy Soft & Chewy treats are also perfect for training, with a low calorie count and chock full of flavor to keep your dog motivated. Buddy Biscuits are also oven baked in the USA with only quality, recognizable ingredients. Healthy dog treats made with quality ingredients and natural peanut butter. Palatable, chewy dog treats perfect for older dogs. Baked in USA only. Contain no added corn, soy, fillers,artificial colors, flavors and artificial preservatives
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Hello, thank you for all your suggestions they are wonderful. My 6 year old boxer has mast cell cancer and now is dealing with cachexia. I already feed her fully home cooked meals of cooked ground beef, fruit and veggies 3 times a day but she continues to loose weigh and muscle. I was told to switch her over slowly to an high protein and fat diet of 1400 calories a day. Wondering if you have any suggestions of new fats or protein, high in calories that is not super expensive but safe to feed. Thanks so much
Unless you are hunting and fishing for your dog… The proteins most people use are farmed. Chicken, beef, pork, fish of all varieties, used for human consumtion, are not the same as from the wild. Even “Organic” meats are still grown on farms. This brings about complications from denser populations that wolves and coyotes dont face when they eat raw. Most people agree Kibble is not a great choice…. The question then becomes is it natural to feed your dog raw farmed meat?
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Hi, I have a 2.4yr old st.bernard.since past yr i feed him homemade food as he was becoming sick with store brought kibbles.I give him rice,pulses, chicken/lamb and atleast 1 type of vegetable everyday, with glenand dog biscuits as treats. But since a puppy he has a skin allergy(with itching) which goes away with lotions/creams but keep on reoccurring every now & then. Can u pls suggest a better diet that help him with healthy skin.
This Easter we were gifted a 22-pound ham (!!!) and while we had our share of Easter feasts, we’ve still got a decent amount left over. I’m not even a little bit mad, because I know I can freeze some for future use and that there are plenty of ways — big and small — that we can use it up this week. Here are 17 of my favorite recipes for using up leftover ham. City hams freeze incredibly well. My suggestion? Freeze the ham in different forms for future use.

What a load of crap. There isn’t a single good recipe that is appropriate for dogs here. Have you even watched the Canine Cancer Series? I’m looking for a good recipe for my sister’s dog (I feed raw & wouldn’t feed this garbage to any dog). 40% protein is crap. 80% protein is required. 10% offal 10% bone (added after cooking or a good bone meal supplement) any add ins like green leafy veggies & a very few berries would be in addition to this. Oats & rice are grains, sweet potato, apple, beets, peas. Nothing I’d feed my carnivore ever.


I have been cooking for our three elderly toy poodles (ages 23, 15, and 15) for a couple of years now, with the vet’s approval and suggestions. I use a pressure cooker set at high for 30 minutes. Combine 2 lbs of ground chicken, 12 oz of raw whole grains (brown rice, steel-cut oatmeal, and/or quinoa) and about a cup of mixed veggies (either diced frozen ones from a bag, or leftovers from our table). Add a tablespoon of sea salt (vet suggested that, for the minerals.) Water to cover in the pot – usually about 8 cups. This makes several days’ worth of dog food; we keep one day’s worth in the fridge and freeze the rest. When we dish it out, we add a powdered supplement recommended by the vet for each dog (one has kidney problems, the other two are just old.)

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Dog Treat Dough - One thing that you need to consider when choosing cutters is the thickness of your dough. If it contains rolled oats, carob chips, or another chunky ingredient, you want to use very simple shaped cutters like hearts or circles. If your dough is simple and has smooth ingredients, like the turkey wheat free dog treats, you can use shapes that have more detail since the detail will be evident after the biscuits are baked.
No, we’re not implying your new canine culinary skills will cause your pet to throw up. We’re referring to the raw diet fad, more affectionately known as “BARF” (which stands for Biologically Appropriate Raw Food). BARF has gained a lot of popularity among dog owners over the last few years. The basic idea is to feed your dog raw meats, grains and veggies just as his canine ancestors ate millions of years ago.

I have been cooking for my Boston Terrier for about 4 months now. She kept throwing up every dog food I bought, and it wasn’t cheap food either. I boil whole chicken, and then the rice,buy frozen vegetables, green beans, peas, carrots, spinach, and want to check on adding something else because she is still shedding so bad and can’t figure out why. I give her a multivitamin from GNC for dogs and wondered if she needs something else. When I take her to the vet I’m going to have her checked because she still chokes and throws up but not like with the dog food. She had some throat problems when she was a puppy, he said was tonsillitis, but I’m thinking she has something wrong with her soft palate or stomach. At least making her food is better than having her throw up every day. I do use coconut oil in the recipe. So sweet potatoes or potatoes would be good to add to? I cook all mine up in a big pot and put in quart freezer bags and it lasts a month. I’ve even started giving my bully about 1 cup w/his dry food and he’s got skin problems he’s doing better. Is there something I can use for her hair?
My daughter volunteers at a dog rescue and we want to make several different batches and bring them to share in celebrating her birthday in a couple months. I LOVE the variety of recipes and especially ones for those dogs with grain allergies or that are diabetic! My question is, will the treats still be good if we make ahead of time and freeze them until closer to the big day? Sadly, I’m not much of a cook so I am not familiar with what freezes well and what wouldn’t.
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