I just started making food for my 10 yr. old lab. Here goes: 2 lbs hamburger 1 lb chicken hearts and gizzards, 1/2 lb beef liver, 8 cups brown rice, large can of collard greens, small can of pumpkin, small can of peas and carrots, 1/2 cup blueberries. I chop up the liverand gizzards. Put it all in 16 cups of water and boli for 20 minutes. I vary the veggies and fruit. She weighs about 90 lbs and needs to lose weight so I feed her 2 lbs a day. I add chia seeds when feeding. 21/4 t a day. She was a picky eater before so she got way too many human food treats. Now she gobbles down her food and no more begging. Just started so I might have to adjust her serving size.

I’ve raised my Shih Tzu since he was 10 weeks old, and he is currently 3 years old. Everyday he eats a different fruit/vegetable, typically with chicken, but he also occasionally he eats salmon, beef, pork (very sparingly since it can cause worms), and turkey. He also eats lentils, rice, beans, and oatmeal. I also add eggshell powder, nutritional yeast, Vitamin C, a small amount of garlic, and fish oil to their food. Variety is good — they need it to get proper nutrition. I’ve never had any dietary problems with him, his skin is healthy and he is energetic. I recently adopted a 8 yr old Llasa Aapso who was religiously fed so called high quality grain free kibble his entire life (I know this because I am related to the prior owner). He developed chronically itchy skin (with blisters and black scar tissue from scratching), and his owners did not know what to do with him. I immediately switched him over to a home made diet (like my Shih Tzu) and he immediately improved. I did give him the anti-fungal, anti-bacterial medication and prednisone the vet prescribed to initially improve (but not get rid of) his skin condition. The vet wanted me to give him the prescription diet and cortisone shots to keep the condition at bay. However, I refused because I know personally based on my own diet changes (I used to be 100+ pounds overweight and I lost it by eating better—not less— food) how feeding your body higher quality food can drastically change your condition. It has been a couple of months, and the Llasa is almost unrecognizable. I truly believe that feeding dogs commercially prepared dog foods leads to many ailments down the road. No human doctor would prescribe eating Total cereal, and a multivitamin to obtain optimum or even mediocre health. I don’t know why people think it is any different for animals and kibble (even high quality ones).
No, we’re not implying your new canine culinary skills will cause your pet to throw up. We’re referring to the raw diet fad, more affectionately known as “BARF” (which stands for Biologically Appropriate Raw Food). BARF has gained a lot of popularity among dog owners over the last few years. The basic idea is to feed your dog raw meats, grains and veggies just as his canine ancestors ate millions of years ago.
Feeding your dog a DIY homemade dog food is something that more and more dog owners are doing these days. It’s understandable as many of us are becoming aware of the shady manufacturing practices in the pet food industry, filler ingredients, fake “Made in USA” labels and other things harmful to our pets. Using homemade dog food recipes is a way to let your pooch enjoy the finer things in life, in particular high-quality and delicious meat.

I’ve raised my Shih Tzu since he was 10 weeks old, and he is currently 3 years old. Everyday he eats a different fruit/vegetable, typically with chicken, but he also occasionally he eats salmon, beef, pork (very sparingly since it can cause worms), and turkey. He also eats lentils, rice, beans, and oatmeal. I also add eggshell powder, nutritional yeast, Vitamin C, a small amount of garlic, and fish oil to their food. Variety is good — they need it to get proper nutrition. I’ve never had any dietary problems with him, his skin is healthy and he is energetic. I recently adopted a 8 yr old Llasa Aapso who was religiously fed so called high quality grain free kibble his entire life (I know this because I am related to the prior owner). He developed chronically itchy skin (with blisters and black scar tissue from scratching), and his owners did not know what to do with him. I immediately switched him over to a home made diet (like my Shih Tzu) and he immediately improved. I did give him the anti-fungal, anti-bacterial medication and prednisone the vet prescribed to initially improve (but not get rid of) his skin condition. The vet wanted me to give him the prescription diet and cortisone shots to keep the condition at bay. However, I refused because I know personally based on my own diet changes (I used to be 100+ pounds overweight and I lost it by eating better—not less— food) how feeding your body higher quality food can drastically change your condition. It has been a couple of months, and the Llasa is almost unrecognizable. I truly believe that feeding dogs commercially prepared dog foods leads to many ailments down the road. No human doctor would prescribe eating Total cereal, and a multivitamin to obtain optimum or even mediocre health. I don’t know why people think it is any different for animals and kibble (even high quality ones).
What a load of crap. There isn’t a single good recipe that is appropriate for dogs here. Have you even watched the Canine Cancer Series? I’m looking for a good recipe for my sister’s dog (I feed raw & wouldn’t feed this garbage to any dog). 40% protein is crap. 80% protein is required. 10% offal 10% bone (added after cooking or a good bone meal supplement) any add ins like green leafy veggies & a very few berries would be in addition to this. Oats & rice are grains, sweet potato, apple, beets, peas. Nothing I’d feed my carnivore ever.
my daughter gave me a deer head/ applehead chiahihiau for a late chritmas present she will be 1 year old the end of july I am noticeing the she will not eat the store boughten treats so I thought I would try homemade treats im also noticeing she will not play with toys I think because she was mistreated befor I got her I keep trying thank you for listening
Prevent unhealthy additives. Many brands of commercial dog treats are filled with preservatives, which help to extend their shelf life. In addition, store bought treats are often made from fillers and byproducts as opposed to natural and high quality ingredients. By creating your own treats at home, you will be able to provide your dog with a healthy snack that is not only nutritious but is also free of unhealthy additives.
I’ve only been making my dog his food for a couple of months. In all the research I’ve done from Holistic Vets and other knowledgeable people I agree with the person who said these recipes are lacking in nutritional value for your pet. I learned that dogs have a short digestive tract so brown rice is not good for them, it will go right through them without being digested. If you want to feed your dog grains, ( I don’t) white rice is at least digestible. Bone meal should be added if your going to feed your dog any meat. Dogs in the wild would eat the flesh of pray also some of the bones. Feeding your pet veggies and fruits is good if you add canine digestive enzymes to the food. Apparently this will help to break down the veggies and make them digestible actually adding nutritional value. It’s a must to add some other nutrients like a superfood supplement containing ground flax seed, dried kelp,lecithin, the B vitamins, omega 3 and 6 fatty acids and so many other needed ingredients. Adding prebiotics and probiotics is necessary also.
I just started making food for my 10 yr. old lab. Here goes: 2 lbs hamburger 1 lb chicken hearts and gizzards, 1/2 lb beef liver, 8 cups brown rice, large can of collard greens, small can of pumpkin, small can of peas and carrots, 1/2 cup blueberries. I chop up the liverand gizzards. Put it all in 16 cups of water and boli for 20 minutes. I vary the veggies and fruit. She weighs about 90 lbs and needs to lose weight so I feed her 2 lbs a day. I add chia seeds when feeding. 21/4 t a day. She was a picky eater before so she got way too many human food treats. Now she gobbles down her food and no more begging. Just started so I might have to adjust her serving size.
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I personally don’t consider 80 degrees F to be a bad temperature to walk your dog in. I live in Iowa and our summers days are often hotter than that, even in the evening around 5:30pm when I walk my dog. Like you said, I make sure to bring water with us and give her rests in the shade if need be. Overall, it’s important to know your dog’s tolerance level. For my dog, Sally, she is perfectly comfortable in those conditions. However, there are some dogs who may struggle in similar conditions.

The opposite problem with DIY homemade dog food recipes is also very common – forgetting to include essential ingredients in your dog’s meal. I've mentioned some of these above – skipping on the vitamins, minerals, and amino acid supplements is often overlooked by pet owners. Samantha has previously explained which supplements may be required for homemade dog food meals, and how to use them safely.
I do not know what discussion is going on, i do have some questions. I am new to all of this making your dog food and I wish i had done this from the start, but better late then never. I can only do Chicken or Turkey recipes, my male English Setter, can not eat beef, he has had 2 severe pancreatic attacks, once at 1 1/2, and then the camp ground managers stopped and gave him treats when we were gone, both times we almost lost him. That being said, with their weight, they get 1 cup of dry in the am & pm, should taht be what i feed to them with cooked or raw dog food?
There are a couple ways that you can do this recipe to make it more fun and interesting for you and your dog. You can either cook the meat and rice/lentils/quinoa up in a pot with water and add the vegetables near the end of cooking. The other option is to cook the rice/lentils/quinoa and vegetables until soft, mix everything together with the raw beef and form them into meatballs. Cook meatballs at 400 degrees for about 45 minutes, or until fully cooked.
I cook for our dogs. We have a 13 year old standard poodle, a yellow lab who is 14 and 2 toy rat terriers. The poodle was seriously sick about a month ago. We did not get a specific diagnosis but he had fever of 107 he did not perk his ears, wag his tail, his rear legs could barely hold him up to pee. He had to be carried out and back in. The only thing he would eat was baked chicken thighs. Now he is back to normal and the lab is sick. Today she was able to get up without assistance one time and twice she was able to get up the 4 steps to the porch. There has been about 2 weeks that she could not get up without assistance She has not had the high fever and both have an occasional huffy cough.
When do dogs live for 14 years in the wild? Cooking meat kills pathogens found in nature, as well as in your favorite grocery store or your favorite butcher. It also kills a few vitamins, but not so many as to cause a problem if you get all the ingredients correct. I don’t trust recipes from amateurs, most of them prove themselves inadequate to the job by anyone with some basic knowledge. I particularly don’t trust rice because of it’s arsenic content (read Consumer Reports, unless you are skeptical about education).
Dogs, wolves, anyone can get salmonella poisoning. It’s what they call survival of the fittest. We don’t exactly keep track of the wolves that are dying and surviving. Plus, their bodies are quite used to it. And as Dawn said below, our dogs are not wild anymore. With children around the house and the way our dogs kiss us/sleep on the bed, I would not feed our dogs raw diet because as we evolve, so do our domesticated dogs. I completely agree that kibble is a big no, but would not feed my dogs raw either.

If your pup loves to chew, make your own chew strips with fresh chicken. Slice chicken breasts into 1/8" thick strips and dehydrate in an oven set to 200 degrees Fahrenheit for about two hours, or until the chicken is dried and chewy. Sprinkle with anise prior to drying for extra flavor. Turkey also can be substituted. Poultry chews make a nice alternative to rawhide treats, which could contain chemicals or preservatives. Store extra chews in the refrigerator or freezer. Chicken jerky can also be made in the microwave by cooking the strips for 20 minutes on medium power until they are chewy.
Christi is the baker, cook, blogger, food photographer, recipe developer and sprinkle lover behind Love From The Oven. As a busy mom, it's important to Christi that her recipes are family-friendly and picky eater approved. In addition to running Love From The Oven, Christi is the author of The My Little Pony Baking Book and Smart Cookie, and the co-author of Peeps-A-Licious.
I have to wonder what you mean when you say “top-quality dog food.” Did you check the ingredients on the label or just go with the well-know brand (like Pedigree, for example). A lot of well-known dog foods have horrible ingredients. I’m a fan of home made, don’t get me wrong, but if you were buying a “brand” dog food with horrible ingredients, no wonder your puppy got sick!
Many dog food recipes fall short in certain nutrients, especially iron, copper, calcium, and zinc. Even some recipes created by veterinarians don't measure up. The University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine tested 200 recipes, many written by vets. The researchers found most of the recipes were short on some essential nutrients.

I have 3 dogs, a border collie, poodle mix and a daschund. They get along very well and we take them daily for at least an hour and 1/2 walk. Lately though, the two smaller ones refuse to eat at their normal feeding time. Dennis, the collie, happily eats, but Teddy and Murdog shiver and hide. I work from home and make their gravy from fresh veg. We spend plenty time together and they are loved and very well taken care of. Why have the little ones behaviour changed so drastically in such a short time?


Peanut butter and apples are a great snack, whether you're human or canine. Mix together 4 C. flour, 1 tbs. baking powder, 2 3/4 C. water, 1/2 tsp. vanilla, 4 tbsp. honey, 1/4 C. finely chopped apple, 1 tbsp. peanut butter and 1 beaten egg. Spoon into small muffin molds and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for about 75 minutes. Remove chews from the molds as soon as they are cool enough to handle. Store in an air-tight container in the refrigerator. For a healthier treat, substitute 1 C. wheat germ for 1 C. of flour, and add 2 tbsp. of ground flax seed.
Many homemade dog food recipes don’t have a full range of vitamins and minerals. Unless you want to get very into adding supplements and so on to make sure your homemade is nutritionally balanced, I’d feed a mix of homemade and high quality kibble – kibble is already fortified with the necessary vitamins and minerals. I’d also double check the recommended protein/carb/fat balance for a puppy – what puppies need and what adult dogs need aren’t the same, so you might need to tweak the homemade food recipes to add or subtract rice and other carb sources to make the ratios right for a puppy. (This is particularly important for larger breed dogs as they need the right balance for joint and bone development for long term health.)
The opposite problem with DIY homemade dog food recipes is also very common – forgetting to include essential ingredients in your dog’s meal. I've mentioned some of these above – skipping on the vitamins, minerals, and amino acid supplements is often overlooked by pet owners. Samantha has previously explained which supplements may be required for homemade dog food meals, and how to use them safely.
I tried to make the Beef Stew and the recipe had me confused (easy to do ). In the listing of ingredients, it says 1/2 cup of flour, and “ 1/2 cup water or organic vegetable oil, plus 1 Tablespoon vegetable oil for frying.” So is that correct? 1/2 cup of water OR 1/2 cup of oil?? Isn’t that kind of a lot of oil? Anyway, I tried the 1/2 cup of water and with 1/2 cup of flour, this became a big ball of yuck. What did I do wrong??
Hi there, I made the Crock pot Beef and Rice meal and I was wondering how many cups per day should I be feeding my basset hound? I tried home cooked dog food because she refuses to eat store bought dog food. We would just leave the bowl filled normally. I know bassets have an issue with obesity so I don’t want to start feeding her too much. She’s a year old and weighs 40 pounds currently. How much should she be eating daily? Thank you!
The point of homemade dog treats is to stay away from preservatives, chemicals, dyes and all the other nonsense. Be smart. Do extensive research on the ingredients you wish to use and the alternative to each of them. Even if you think your dog has a ‘tolerance’ for milk, you should use it regardless unless you 100% know of any additives. In that case I just take milk right out of the equation. Theres no need for it anyway.
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