Hi Kathy! I believe there was a link toward the beginning of the article but, for a puppy, the general rule (from what I understand) is 1/2 a cup for every 5 pounds of weight. So, if your pup weighs 15 pounds, you’d feed it 1 1/2 cups a day, ideally splitting it into three servings (most commonly 7am, 12pm, and 5pm) of 1/2 a cup. I hope I helped you out a bit!
One of his favorite meals is chicken baked in a little water, no spices, salt or pepper, added to some steamed carrots, sweet potato, acorn squash, broccoli some raspberries and blue berries. I usually make enough for 2 meals per day for 5 days. Everything I’ve learned says keep in the fridge no more than 3-5 days….so I push it a bit with the 5 days.I hope what I’ve learned will help someone. I suggest doing a lot of research, it seems that feeding our loved little pets can harm them if we feed them the wrong things over a period of time.
I have a 9 year old toy poodle mix and a 5 year old shih tzu- and they are very finicky so I started cooking for them and my vet was okay with it. I make either turkey or chicken I use brown rice, green peas ,green beans, carrots, zucchini, pumpkin/ or sweet potatoes and sometimes broccoli and cauliflower. I cook the ground meat with olive oil then cut and boil all vegetables let both sit then cook rice. I mix everything together and I will add a can of dog pumpkin (low in sugar) I make a big pot and freeze in big freezer 1 gallon bag which is 1 week for both dogs. I usually cook once a month. My dogs love it they lick the plates. Seems happier. I also saw where people are worried about calcium, well I give my dogs every morning 3 tablespoon of goat milk for each dog. It does take about an hour or so to complete the receipt but worth it. My dogs haven’t gained weight and because of all the water in vegetables they hardly drink water which they drank so much with commercial food. It makes me so happy to see them happy
You’ve been at this “business” a while and it would seem you have heard everything under the sun. As I read your comments above, I noticed how patient and kind you are with each person who comments, even if you’ve said the same thing a hundred times, lol. I’m in marketing, and I’m sure you’ve heard this before, but just wanted to point out that your heading and claim could be considered confusing. I landed on your page following a link, “25 Simple Dog Treat Recipes: 5 Ingredients or less.” When I arrived on your page, the heading said “23 Simple Dog Treat Recipes: 5 Ingredients or less.” Perhaps most people wouldn’t notice that the information doesn’t match, but being a person of integrity, I thought you would want to be aware, so you could adjust the Headline to match the claim. Thank you for caring for those furry friends we love so much!
That is a great question, Teresa! From what we’ve found, there is no nutritional requirement for wheat in a dog’s diet, but there are benefits to its presence. Certain wheats contain fibers that help the grown of beneficial bacteria in the gut or intestines. Fiber found in wheat helps keep your dog’s bowel movements regular. Older dogs are more susceptible to develop constipation, so an increase in fiber can help keep things moving. Wheat also packs a burst of energy, the carbs found in wheat grain are great for fueling muscular and metabolic activities.
If your dog truly can’t get enough peanut butter, pick up some peanut butter dog treats to reward him without the mess usually accompanied by the creamy stuff. Some dogs get a kick out of treat dispensing toys others get the most joy out of gnawing on their favorite rawhide bones. Rawhide bones and antlers for dogs don’t just keep your dog entertained, they also help clean their teeth and promote gum health. Whether your special pooch prefers to earn an irresistible training treat or munch on some organic dog treats, reward your dog today with his favorite nutritious and flavorful dog treats.
All of the above dog food recipes will be deficient in many essential nutrients. There is no significant source of calcium or adequate sources of micronutrients such as B vitamins, vitamin D, etc. In addition to lacking calcium, the calcium:phosphorus ratio is an important consideration. Please consult your veterinarian before feeding any home diet. These are not adequate!!

Hi Kathy! I believe there was a link toward the beginning of the article but, for a puppy, the general rule (from what I understand) is 1/2 a cup for every 5 pounds of weight. So, if your pup weighs 15 pounds, you’d feed it 1 1/2 cups a day, ideally splitting it into three servings (most commonly 7am, 12pm, and 5pm) of 1/2 a cup. I hope I helped you out a bit!
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