Surprisingly, there's a number of homemade dog food recipes found online that consist of things that no dog should consume (or consume very little, yet the recipe mentions dangerous amounts). Some of the more extreme examples include giving your dog large amounts of garlic as a way to prevent intestinal worms or feeding your pup avocado, “because it’s healthy for people”.
My daughter volunteers at a dog rescue and we want to make several different batches and bring them to share in celebrating her birthday in a couple months. I LOVE the variety of recipes and especially ones for those dogs with grain allergies or that are diabetic! My question is, will the treats still be good if we make ahead of time and freeze them until closer to the big day? Sadly, I’m not much of a cook so I am not familiar with what freezes well and what wouldn’t.
Dogs, wolves, anyone can get salmonella poisoning. It’s what they call survival of the fittest. We don’t exactly keep track of the wolves that are dying and surviving. Plus, their bodies are quite used to it. And as Dawn said below, our dogs are not wild anymore. With children around the house and the way our dogs kiss us/sleep on the bed, I would not feed our dogs raw diet because as we evolve, so do our domesticated dogs. I completely agree that kibble is a big no, but would not feed my dogs raw either.
Not sure what I did wrong but the dough turned out SOOOOO wet! I ended up adding another 1/2 cup of oats and another 1-1.5 cups of flour before I could work with it! And it was still very gummy. BUT I got it to work and they are now done. They hardened up well still. Just time to cool and let the pooch try them out! I’m sure he will love them but I’m just curious why my dough was so wet? Overall I’m still very happy with the base of this recipe and ingredients as some I’ve seen have me questioning if it’s a good idea to feed some of the ingredients to my pup. I did sub out canola oil for olive oil as well as I didnt have an canola!
I’ve only been making my dog his food for a couple of months. In all the research I’ve done from Holistic Vets and other knowledgeable people I agree with the person who said these recipes are lacking in nutritional value for your pet. I learned that dogs have a short digestive tract so brown rice is not good for them, it will go right through them without being digested. If you want to feed your dog grains, ( I don’t) white rice is at least digestible. Bone meal should be added if your going to feed your dog any meat. Dogs in the wild would eat the flesh of pray also some of the bones. Feeding your pet veggies and fruits is good if you add canine digestive enzymes to the food. Apparently this will help to break down the veggies and make them digestible actually adding nutritional value. It’s a must to add some other nutrients like a superfood supplement containing ground flax seed, dried kelp,lecithin, the B vitamins, omega 3 and 6 fatty acids and so many other needed ingredients. Adding prebiotics and probiotics is necessary also.

Also, please note that because of volume , we are unable to respond to individual comments, although we do watch them in order to learn what issues and questions are most common so that we can produce content that fulfills your needs. You are welcome to share your own dog tips and behavior solutions among yourselves, however Thank you for reading our articles and sharing your thoughts with the pack!
From fetching his favorite ball to successfully sitting on command, your dog deserves delicious and healthy dog treats. In addition to your verbal praise and affection, there's nothing your dog enjoys more than some mouth-watering rawhide bones or crunchy training treats. Having a natural inclination to please, dogs love to be praised, which is why it's important that they be rewarded with healthy dog biscuits. Healthy dog treats can also add variety to your dog's diet. And because peanut butter dog treats are a fan favorite, they are often available in varieties that provide additional nutritional support under the cloak of their delicious flavor. There are treats enriched with glucosamine to promote better hip and joint health, wheat-grass for better digestion, and more. For dogs with allergies, there are hypoallergenic organic dog treats that are wheat, gluten and corn-free, and even low-calorie treats for less active dogs.
my dogs eat Merrick freeze dried bits with kibble and then organic wet dog food and i change it every other day and noticed they have diarrhea so i called their vet and she said i need to feed them white rice and chicken until it gets solid again. well today it looks more solid but i know they wont go back to what i was feeding them so how can i add in the healthy beneficial foods to their diet without hurting their tummies again.

“In 2015, the World Health Organization found that processed meats such as bacon and sausage were known carcinogens linked to cancer. Bacon is an incredibly rich and fatty food with a high salt content, which can prove to be too much for a dog’s stomach to handle. Eating a large amount can cause pancreatitis, which can be fatal.” [http://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/natural-foods/can-dogs-eat-pork/]”

Thank you to the readers who have mentioned the issue with using bacon fat for dogs. A trace amount of bacon grease (two tablespoons divided amongst 30 biscuits = less than 1 gram of bacon fat per serving) shouldn’t be a concern. Of course, we’re not veterinarians over here, so please check with your vet or use an alternative type of oil if you are concerned.
The Pumpkin dog biscuit recipe is incomplete. It calls for cold water, but does not give you instruction on where/when to use said water. It also calls for you to reserve some of the “rice mixture” but then asks you to add the pumpkin mixture (w egg(s), even though recipe says 1 egg). How then would you reserve the mixture to which you are adding? It also says it makes 24 “balls,” but details instructions to roll out on parchment paper. Just overall very unclear.
Many dog food recipes fall short in certain nutrients, especially iron, copper, calcium, and zinc. Even some recipes created by veterinarians don't measure up. The University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine tested 200 recipes, many written by vets. The researchers found most of the recipes were short on some essential nutrients.
When preparing DIY homemade dog food, it's likely you'll be making large quantities of it. After all, you don’t want to cook it every day. However, with the larger quantities come some potential storage problems. And not storing your pet's food properly in a special dog food storage container or fridge, not freezing when needed, is about as dangerous as not storing your own food in an adequate way.
As I eat my weight in sweet strawberries this time of year, the subject of what to do with the abundance of spring and summer fruit comes to mind. I am usually more than content with enjoying berries and stone fruit as-is, but when I’ve gone a little overboard at the farmers market, jam is one of the many things I consider making. Or is it jelly? The two terms for fruit spread have always confused me a bit. Luckily, there’s an easy way to distinguish between the two.
The food isn’t for your kid it’s for your dog. Dogs don’t need sweets, but some foods need to be mushy for them to be able to digest it. May I suggest you take a look at the ingredients in your store bought dog food and notice all the uses of the word ‘meal’ it may taste better to your kids, but I guarantee you it’s not as good for your dog as homemade.

When preparing DIY homemade dog food, it's likely you'll be making large quantities of it. After all, you don’t want to cook it every day. However, with the larger quantities come some potential storage problems. And not storing your pet's food properly in a special dog food storage container or fridge, not freezing when needed, is about as dangerous as not storing your own food in an adequate way.
No they need vitamins and enzymes, as do most of these home cooked recipes. Digestive enzymes, so go check out the website enzymes and click on Pet’s and talk to your vet about giving a multi vitamin, many will prescribe a child’s vitamin. Your cooking ok but not so much burger. And many dogs allergies stem from food. Try adding in pumpkin purée and some greens no beans! Brown rice not white. Bsrley, peas,sweet potatoes no white potatoes. Poultry chicken and turkey many dogs are allergic to. Even humans need digestive enzymes. Most problems with skin and digestion is because of no enzymes!
Welcome to Next Week’s Meal Plan! I want to help you find inspiration and ease some of the pain points that come with getting dinner on the table night after night, whether you’re cooking for one or a family of eight. That’s why, as promised, this series is shifting — every week I’ll be answering reader requests and sharing meal plans that you want to see.It’s not too late! What type of meal plans would you like to see?
Dogs of all ages, from puppies to seniors, enjoy treats. Dog treats are a wonderful way to bond with your pet, give them something to chew on, reward them for good behavior or just to see them jump for joy. You'll find all their favorites at PetSmart, where we carry a wide selection of top brands. Snacks can even be part of their healthy diet every day, if used sparingly. Dental chews help keep their teeth clean and their gums healthy. Even pups with food sensitivities have a selection of gluten free, grain free, and natural dog treats to choose from. With real meaty bones, flavored dental treats, crunchy cookies and baked goods, rawhide, puppy treats and more, finding something they'll love is simple.

To be fair, humans do not suckle a cow either but we still eat dairy. 🙂 We have found sources online that say it’s ok to give a dog dairy as long as they’re not lactose intolerant, the same goes for grain. Each dog is unique so it’s important to know what is ok for your dog’s digestive system and to talk to your vet if you have any questions. I know many dogs who have eaten dairy and grain and have been completely fine.


Have you tried removing an ingredient each feeding to see if maybe it’s one specific thing she is allergic too …. otherwise it could be something environmental maybe the metel or plastic in the dish she eats from maybe a plant or pollen from a nearby plant materials from rugs or carpets … Also I feed honey to my allergy pup just drizzle a couple tablespoons over food as it’s anti fungel and helped tremendously with three of my allergy babies also plain yogurt I mix it with a little natural peanut butter and purred banana freeze for a treat in ice cube trey or small cups I wish you best of luck hope you find her some relief
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I’ve been making my own dog food for over a year now. I started when one of my pups got sick and I had to make him a bland diet of chicken and rice. They love the “human food” and I feel good knowing they are getting the healthiest diet possible. I do add the supplement Azestfor to the food to make sure they are getting all their nutrients. If you are questioning if your dog is getting enough supplements I would definitely recommend using it. 🙂


In my experience that is odd. I have experienced the exact opposite in my dogs, and I have more rice and a ton of vegetable matter. Is the Rachel Ray food also a new thing for your dogs? Because kibble is typically associated with voluminous stools. Meat and carrots certainly wouldn’t cause this problem on their own. Are you cooking the game meat? I sure hope so…introduction of a raw protein might also cause loose as well as voluminous stool, not to mention being a potential source of parasitic infection, but that’s a whole nother issue.
My little dog is 8 years old I have had her for about 2 months she is a rescue dog, we have bonded very much and she is health. A few days ago she stopped eating I have tried changing her dog food but she will have nothing to do with it and I have tried to give her chicken and hamburger but she wont eat that either. What should I do? Help I am getting very worried about. Thanks for your help.

One of the pleasures of cooking a ham for a large gathering, obviously outside of eating it, is that the city hams we glaze and bake for holidays are already cooked. This should take the guesswork out of cooking a ham at home, right? But because most hams are quite large and have spiral cuts and giant bones to contend with, it can be hard to tell when a ham is actually “done” cooking. Here’s everything you need to know about ham temperatures for reheating and serving.
However, homemade dog food isn’t risk-free either. A 2013 study by the Journal of the American Veterinary Association from a while back showed that more than 90% of homemade dog food recipes found online may be bad for your dog. The study went over 200 recipes from reputable veterinary textbooks and certified veterinary nutritionists, as well as other pet-related sources, and of the 200 recipes, 191 weren’t up to par with the Association’s standards. That’s ~96%!
Dog treats serve a number of useful purposes. They help satisfy your dog’s need to chew, and they’re an indispensable part of training, especially for food-motivated pups. Crunchy dog biscuits and smaller treats can be given as dog training treats or everyday snacks to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Long-lasting dog treats are great for special occasions. They can help reduce stress as your dog chews or keep her occupied when guests visit. Every pup loves good natural dog bones or bully sticks, and naturally shed antlers for dogs will keep your dogs chewing happily for hours. Chewy also contains a wide range of dog treats including dental chews dog treats, soft dog treats, dog jerky treats, freeze dried dog treats, prescription dog treats, dehydrated dog treats and more. Treat-dispensing dog toys can add another layer of chewing fun. Get the best dog treats, pet food online at Chewy!
Meet the Buddy Biscuits Family Simple, Crunchy Goodness - Born in 1999, I soon set the standard for oven baked dog treats. With simple ingredients, mouth-watering flavor and a satisfying crunch, I am still a favorite of dogs near and far. Soft & delicious, naturally! The soft texture of these mouth-watering treats makes them perfect for our four-legged friends who prefer a soft treat. We packed them with flavor and simple ingredients, so you’ll love them as much as your dog does. Function meets Delicious - Buddy Boosters offer a boost of glucosamine and chondroitin in every piece and Buddy Trainers are the perfect size for training your pup. These low calorie chews are oven baked and have a delicious soft texture. Naturally Purrr-fect Cat Treats! Our cat treats are made from the quality ingredients you want for your cat, like real meat and wholesome vegetables, with no grains or artificial flavors. SNUGGLEOFFOLOUS - So amazing that we had to create a new word to describe how soft, fluffy, snuggly, and wonderful smelling your dog will be after using our grooming products.

In the past food was left out for them and some would be thrown out next morning which I assumed was a sign they were getting plenty but now they clean everything up and show like I said a remarkable change the youngest is a 3-year-old little cross Jack Russel/Shitzu and she has always had coarse hair and I would say a thin frame but never looked starving just excepted as being small framed she now has a smooth coat and apart from her name “spud” as she looked like a baked potato with a tail ( I wanted to call her Gizmo after the gremlin with her satellite dish ears) when we got her as a rescue pup you would not believe its the same dog, she was always happy with a none stop wagging tail and looked healthy but she looks so much healthier and both of them seem different in themselves in a way I can’t explain but for the better.

Find out from your vet how much insulin she needs for 10 grams of carbohydrate. Then to the chicken or other meats add turnip greens and sweet potatoes. You might add a small amount of rice Cook the rice in 7 times more water than rice. ( 1 cup of rice to 7 cups of water or 1/4 cup rice to 1 and 3/4 cups if water. 1/2 cup rice to 3 1/2 cups water. I know every rice chart says less but dogs like it better with more water AND dogs drink less water if there is more in the rice.
I recently started making my dogs’ food, started as basically just a way of using up excess veggies, and lunch meat in lieu of throwing it away. Just run them– chicken, ham, beef, turkey lunch meat, along with my salad fixings–kale, spinach, cabbage, tomatoes– and the vegetables I mixed in with their wet food every night. Corn, broccoli, lima beans, carrots. Ran everything through the chopper..keep the veggies in one container, the meat in the other. For the first time in years, they eat every bite of their food. And added benefit? It’s WAY cheaper than the $9 a night (I have three big dogs) canned food I’ve been feeding them.
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