My dogs used to love all of the soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits flavors. They were easy to break up into soft bits that my tiny and toothless dogs could eat. Around the fall of 2018, I noticed that the treats were arriving hard and not chewy. I assumed they were stale, but after trying more bags, I realized that the company has changed them. They should not label them as soft and chewy anymore. Also, the bags also used to state that the treats are "grain-free", while wheat flour was the 2nd ingredient on the bag! They have removed that claim from the bags, but it made me wonder about the company's awareness of their product, if they have made multiple mistakes in regards to claims and labeling. I've found another truly soft treat here on Amazon that my dogs prefer, and are able to eat.

I bought this for my 20lb dog who looooooves cheese. I like it because I can easily break it into small pieces for training (one piece is about 1.5" and that's too big for him as a training treat), and my dog who is allergic to a lot of things doesn't seem to have any reaction to this one. However, he isn't crazy about it (he likes it though!), which means its taste is not as cheesy as I hoped. We are in the middle of an intense training period and I need to have different levels of treats. I wanted this one to be the highest prize but unfortunately it didn't work that way.
I needed to help my 10 yr old, 100 lb dog lose weight. I found that he loved cooked vegetables, especially green beans, that are filling yet low in calories. So I bought the huge (1 gal) can of green beans and added a large scoop to his regular kibble when I didn’t have other cooked vegetables left over from my meals. He love sauerkraut too! I was working full time and didn’t have a lot of extra time to cook his meals from scratch.

I was thinking the same thing when I read them. I’m no nutritionist, but it is my passion and I’ve been studying human and animal nutrition for a long time. I’m glad somebody pointed this out. Steve, do you have a specific recipe you would use? I thought mine was great, but my dog apparently had sediment build-up in his bladder on a recent ultrasound. The vet hopes it’s just dehydration but thinks it could be his homemade diet. He said the sediment could come from excessive protein (which seems strange because I was just recently thinking his diet may be too carb heavy). Any tips would be awesome!
- Exclusions: ORIJEN, ACANA, Taste of the Wild, Hill's Pet Nutrition food and treats (Hill's Prescription Diet, Hill's Science Diet, Hill's Ideal Balance and Hill's Bioactive Recipe); Purina brands (Pro Plan, Muse, Beyond and Tidy Cats); Petsafe Brands (PetSafe, SportDOG, Frolicat, Drinkwell, Solvit', ScoopFree, Pet Loo, Gentle Leader, Mr. Herzher's and Piddle Place); Educator E-Collars; Playology; Dollar per Gallon tanks, 50% off or more tanks; select Precious Cat litter products; select Zilla Critter Cages; WholeHearted Memberships, Repeat Delivery orders and subscriptions; out-of-stock items, prior purchases, Donations, Petco Gift Cards and eGift Cards.
How about vitamins & minerals, i cant find it now but i seen one recipe taht said you can not feed a home made diet without feeding them the vitamins, and is there specific ones that i should look for and is that placed in their food when you serve it, or when you cook it? And what is the best book to help decide raw or cooked, and recipes for both, along with the vitamins..

This Easter we were gifted a 22-pound ham (!!!) and while we had our share of Easter feasts, we’ve still got a decent amount left over. I’m not even a little bit mad, because I know I can freeze some for future use and that there are plenty of ways — big and small — that we can use it up this week. Here are 17 of my favorite recipes for using up leftover ham. City hams freeze incredibly well. My suggestion? Freeze the ham in different forms for future use.
If you have yet to meet the drop dinner, it’s about time you introduced yourself. The concept? Dump a handful of things into a slow cooker or Instant Pot and let the appliance do all the work. Sure, you may have to chop up a few vegetables or sear a piece of meat in the Instant Pot, but really there’s no work for you beyond that besides grabbing the plates and forks.
Frittatas have long been my go-to solution anytime I need to use up the sad-looking produce, wilting herbs, and little nubs of cheese in my fridge. It’s not often I make them with a plan — until now. Inspired by my favorite cheesy dip and the warm spring weather, I came up with a frittata loaded with garlicky marinated artichoke hearts, earthy baby spinach, salty Parm, and rich sour cream. I knew it would be good, but it went above and beyond all of my expectations.
This post totally cracked me up! Mainly because I have been thinking of making little pup treats for 2 weeks now. I’ve been hooked on Diane’s Gingie cookies (see OvenHug for the best gingie recipe eh=vah) and making them non-stop. Our finicky little chihuahua mix loves sharing bites with me. I want to make a gluten free version of my gingies so that our senior pup, Oscar can also join us – he has sensitive tummy issues. I just need to find a bone shaped cookie cutter and we’re in business. Thanks for the laughs. Your pup cookies look amazin’! Thanks for sharing. xo

Also, the things you said about a raw diet is 100% false. The AVMA may not be behind it but there are many vets that advocate a raw diet. I have been feeding my dog a PMR (prey model raw) diet for a year and just started my 7 month old pup on it and they’ve never been healthier. If you’re clean and sanitary in your meat handling and clean up, like you would be if it were for your own consumption, it’s completely safe.
When do dogs live for 14 years in the wild? Cooking meat kills pathogens found in nature, as well as in your favorite grocery store or your favorite butcher. It also kills a few vitamins, but not so many as to cause a problem if you get all the ingredients correct. I don’t trust recipes from amateurs, most of them prove themselves inadequate to the job by anyone with some basic knowledge. I particularly don’t trust rice because of it’s arsenic content (read Consumer Reports, unless you are skeptical about education).
Kelsie- My 10 yr old lab has mast cell. I met with a holistic vet after my vet wanted to keep her on steroids (which are not good). I am now cooking her food and this recipe does not give everything that’s needed and flour is not good. I also just started her on a drink for humans called NingXia Red. It’s expensive, but the holistic vet recommended it (she does not sell it either so she had nothing to gain from telling me this). Check with your vet or a holistic vet in your area on what you should be feeding. A lot of foods give off histamines which are not good for mast cell patients. Good luck!
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