As I eat my weight in sweet strawberries this time of year, the subject of what to do with the abundance of spring and summer fruit comes to mind. I am usually more than content with enjoying berries and stone fruit as-is, but when I’ve gone a little overboard at the farmers market, jam is one of the many things I consider making. Or is it jelly? The two terms for fruit spread have always confused me a bit. Luckily, there’s an easy way to distinguish between the two.

“In 2015, the World Health Organization found that processed meats such as bacon and sausage were known carcinogens linked to cancer. Bacon is an incredibly rich and fatty food with a high salt content, which can prove to be too much for a dog’s stomach to handle. Eating a large amount can cause pancreatitis, which can be fatal.” [http://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/natural-foods/can-dogs-eat-pork/]”


Also, the things you said about a raw diet is 100% false. The AVMA may not be behind it but there are many vets that advocate a raw diet. I have been feeding my dog a PMR (prey model raw) diet for a year and just started my 7 month old pup on it and they’ve never been healthier. If you’re clean and sanitary in your meat handling and clean up, like you would be if it were for your own consumption, it’s completely safe.
That is a great question, Teresa! From what we’ve found, there is no nutritional requirement for wheat in a dog’s diet, but there are benefits to its presence. Certain wheats contain fibers that help the grown of beneficial bacteria in the gut or intestines. Fiber found in wheat helps keep your dog’s bowel movements regular. Older dogs are more susceptible to develop constipation, so an increase in fiber can help keep things moving. Wheat also packs a burst of energy, the carbs found in wheat grain are great for fueling muscular and metabolic activities.
All of the above dog food recipes will be deficient in many essential nutrients. There is no significant source of calcium or adequate sources of micronutrients such as B vitamins, vitamin D, etc. In addition to lacking calcium, the calcium:phosphorus ratio is an important consideration. Please consult your veterinarian before feeding any home diet. These are not adequate!!
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