My dogs are 9-lb Chihuahuas, and they LOVE these Buddy Biscuits Soft & Chewy Peanut Butter treats! l like that they are soft and easy for my dogs to chew, and the size is perfect for small breed dogs. Because they are soft treats, my dogs don't leave a pile of crumbs on the floor after eating these treats! I usually give my dogs each a few of these treats right before heading out the door whenever I have to leave the house; because these are peanut butter flavor, my hand doesn't stink like meat right after reaching into the bag to give them to my dogs! Major plus in my book!
I’ve been feeding my doggies my own recipe for dog food for the last few years and they all are doing so much better! (Investing in an Instant Pot is a life and time saver!) My 13 year old schnoodle got so much more pep back in his step after getting put on this diet. He still prances about. They have less intestinal issues and it saved me money. I’ll never go back. I make it daily and keep containers well stocked to miss some days of making if needed.
The opposite problem with DIY homemade dog food recipes is also very common – forgetting to include essential ingredients in your dog’s meal. I've mentioned some of these above – skipping on the vitamins, minerals, and amino acid supplements is often overlooked by pet owners. Samantha has previously explained which supplements may be required for homemade dog food meals, and how to use them safely.
However, homemade dog food isn’t risk-free either. A 2013 study by the Journal of the American Veterinary Association from a while back showed that more than 90% of homemade dog food recipes found online may be bad for your dog. The study went over 200 recipes from reputable veterinary textbooks and certified veterinary nutritionists, as well as other pet-related sources, and of the 200 recipes, 191 weren’t up to par with the Association’s standards. That’s ~96%!
“Quality control” doesn’t have a nice ring to it – anyone involved in the manufacturing of pet foods, pet medicine or other pet products that require quality control and monitoring by agencies like FDA and USDA do not want to hear about it, because it increases costs. This is why companies that make human-grade dog food and have frequent factory inspections (like The Honest Kitchen) have to raise costs for their pet food products.
Hello and thanks for the comment! We believe that having a diet consisting of 50% vegetables of assorted colors and types provides the necessary vitamins needed for any living being. Regarding feeding your dog raw: we completely respect your position and appreciate that you are feeding raw to your dog. Canine Journal has never taken a stance on raw diets. We only shared what the American Veterinary Medical Association’s position is on the matter. We only said that the AVMA is not ok with raw. This is not misinformation this is a fact to show that the AVMA is not behind this. That does not mean that other vets are not behind it. Wishing you and your pup a healthy winter!
I’ve been making my own dog food for over a year now. I started when one of my pups got sick and I had to make him a bland diet of chicken and rice. They love the “human food” and I feel good knowing they are getting the healthiest diet possible. I do add the supplement Azestfor to the food to make sure they are getting all their nutrients. If you are questioning if your dog is getting enough supplements I would definitely recommend using it. 🙂
Homemade dog food recipes are one of the more controversial topics among pet owners and veterinarians. Depending on who you ask, you may hear that homemade dog food is a waste of time and no more nutritionally beneficial than commercial diets or that the best homemade dog food recipes can have an extremely positive effect on your dog's health and well-being.
I have a 5 month old puppy who will not eat unless beyond starving, I have tried every brand of dog food on the market, wet and dry. Making my own was the only choice I was left with and she eats a different meal every day. Dogs only get “sensitive” to food if you stick with one kind morning, noon and night, then they have issues. If they have a varied diet from young, they have no problems. Mine has boundless energy perfect poos, glossy coat and bright eyes.
Meet the Buddy Biscuits Family Simple, Crunchy Goodness - Born in 1999, I soon set the standard for oven baked dog treats. With simple ingredients, mouth-watering flavor and a satisfying crunch, I am still a favorite of dogs near and far. Soft & delicious, naturally! The soft texture of these mouth-watering treats makes them perfect for our four-legged friends who prefer a soft treat. We packed them with flavor and simple ingredients, so you’ll love them as much as your dog does. Function meets Delicious - Buddy Boosters offer a boost of glucosamine and chondroitin in every piece and Buddy Trainers are the perfect size for training your pup. These low calorie chews are oven baked and have a delicious soft texture. Naturally Purrr-fect Cat Treats! Our cat treats are made from the quality ingredients you want for your cat, like real meat and wholesome vegetables, with no grains or artificial flavors. SNUGGLEOFFOLOUS - So amazing that we had to create a new word to describe how soft, fluffy, snuggly, and wonderful smelling your dog will be after using our grooming products.
One of the pleasures of cooking a ham for a large gathering, obviously outside of eating it, is that the city hams we glaze and bake for holidays are already cooked. This should take the guesswork out of cooking a ham at home, right? But because most hams are quite large and have spiral cuts and giant bones to contend with, it can be hard to tell when a ham is actually “done” cooking. Here’s everything you need to know about ham temperatures for reheating and serving.
Thank you to the readers who have mentioned the issue with using bacon fat for dogs. A trace amount of bacon grease (two tablespoons divided amongst 30 biscuits = less than 1 gram of bacon fat per serving) shouldn’t be a concern. Of course, we’re not veterinarians over here, so please check with your vet or use an alternative type of oil if you are concerned.
I don’t give her dog treats. She gets carrots, watermelon, celery (doesn’t like celery too much), and once in a while a smear of natural peanut butter on a carrot. I pretty much cook for her like the recipes in this article. No flour though. And no seasoning of any kind. When she gets an occasional upset stomach, I give here white rice and chicken only.

I am have 4 100+lb dogs I make there food and fix it fresh every meal yes it is time consuming I have one female around 120 or lbs she breaks out after eating her meals in hives and it is worse if given Benadryl she is 3 yrs old I need some help I have changed diet and when I think I have found something that works I delivered these dogs so this is an old problem . HELP
The easiest way is to throw everything in a large slow cooker. 5 pounds regular ground beef, 3 pounds chopped beef liver, three cups of frozen or fresh veg and/or fruit, (carrots, peas, butternut squash, broccoli, blueberry, pumpkin etc.) 4 cups parboiled rice, 8 cups of water. 5 hours on high, longer on low and its done. A weeks worth in the fridge in what it was cooked in for an 80 lb dog. (substitute liver with any other organ, or rice with oats, quinoa, egg noodles, rice noodles).
I have to wonder what you mean when you say “top-quality dog food.” Did you check the ingredients on the label or just go with the well-know brand (like Pedigree, for example). A lot of well-known dog foods have horrible ingredients. I’m a fan of home made, don’t get me wrong, but if you were buying a “brand” dog food with horrible ingredients, no wonder your puppy got sick!
Most companies that makes homemade dog food include the heart, kidneys,and liver of whatever meat you want. Do you have recipes that include these ingredients? They charge at Least$200 a month to feed my dog if I order online homemade but if I get these ingredients at the butcher it’s only about $12 for the organs so I want to do it myself. Can you please suggest recipes that include these?
Originally from Chicago, Nicole Janiga joined the Chewy team as a marketing intern in January 2017. Since then, Nicole has continued writing and photographing for Chewy as a Content Collaborator while completing her education at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business. She is majoring in both marketing and corporate innovation, before returning to Chewy as a Marketing Analyst. In her free time, Nicole enjoys traveling, riding her horse or snuggling up with her Pug, @zoetheloaf, and Terrier, Cozmo. 
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