I have a 9 year old toy poodle mix and a 5 year old shih tzu- and they are very finicky so I started cooking for them and my vet was okay with it. I make either turkey or chicken I use brown rice, green peas ,green beans, carrots, zucchini, pumpkin/ or sweet potatoes and sometimes broccoli and cauliflower. I cook the ground meat with olive oil then cut and boil all vegetables let both sit then cook rice. I mix everything together and I will add a can of dog pumpkin (low in sugar) I make a big pot and freeze in big freezer 1 gallon bag which is 1 week for both dogs. I usually cook once a month. My dogs love it they lick the plates. Seems happier. I also saw where people are worried about calcium, well I give my dogs every morning 3 tablespoon of goat milk for each dog. It does take about an hour or so to complete the receipt but worth it. My dogs haven’t gained weight and because of all the water in vegetables they hardly drink water which they drank so much with commercial food. It makes me so happy to see them happy
Unless you are hunting and fishing for your dog… The proteins most people use are farmed. Chicken, beef, pork, fish of all varieties, used for human consumtion, are not the same as from the wild. Even “Organic” meats are still grown on farms. This brings about complications from denser populations that wolves and coyotes dont face when they eat raw. Most people agree Kibble is not a great choice…. The question then becomes is it natural to feed your dog raw farmed meat?
Many dog food recipes fall short in certain nutrients, especially iron, copper, calcium, and zinc. Even some recipes created by veterinarians don't measure up. The University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine tested 200 recipes, many written by vets. The researchers found most of the recipes were short on some essential nutrients.
I am making food for my 7 year old shih tzu. I have read books and am putting in 1/4 tea egg shells for calcium and some chicken liver with the meat, vegetables and rice or other grain I use to make the food. Would I need to add a supplement? What do you suggest? My Vet was concerned about me making the food. After a scare with a recall that I did not know about until months after my dog was having problems, I cannot imaging that the canned food I used is better for my dog. But, I want to make the food and make it the best I can. Thank you.

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As an example, my dog (100 pounds) eats 3-4 cups per day (plus measured out treats). If I just used the amount he ate in one day there might be enough difference to have an effect. His food is 393 kcal/cup. He needs about 1200-1600 kcals a day from his food- or 1400/day. If I change food all I have to do is a bit of math and I’ve got what he should be eating. One food may be digested better or worse than another so you still have to feel the ribs. Calories, not volume or weight, is the way to go.

“Prescription diets” like Hills Science Diet and Royal Canine are pretty much a scam. I used to feed it to my dogs who over the years often developed disease such as cancer and other ailments. The state of Ca has sued these companies for false advertising and collusion with certain vet chains where the vets get kick backs for “prescribing” these brands for your sick pets. When examining the ingredients, youll see they can include inferior protien and starch sourses such as corn, and meat byproducts. Plus, as this article explained, kibble itself is a nutritionally compromised food (due to the production method of high heat and extrusion). Sure, its convenient and less work for the human, but over time, will likely be damaging to a dog’s (or cats) organs. Google yourself to research… if you dont know where to start, try Dr Karen Becker, a holistic and traditional vet who provides excellent information and advice on pet food and ailments, weight controll, and prevention. I have been very happy feeding a commercial (Honest Kitchen) nutritionally ballanced dehydrated raw food mixture (add water) with supplimental fresh foods. These recipes sound great too!
These recipes for dinners are not balanced at all. I would never dream of feeding this many veggies and carbs with such low protein amount. What about calcium? What about fish oils, Vitamine E? And that you say never to change them up? Wow… I hope no one feeds this long term. There are reliable facebook groups with formulas for calculating the correct percentages of food.
If your fur baby has a sweet tooth he will love these chews, and oatmeal adds protein and is good for digestion. To make these chewy treats, puree 1/4 C. diced peaches, 1 tbsp. canola oil, 1 tbsp. molasses, 1/4 tsp. vanilla and 1/8 C. water. Combine the puree with 2 C. rolled oats, 1/2 C. water, 1 C. flour and 1 tsp. cinnamon. Scoop spoon-sized dollops on to a lightly greased baking sheet, press them flat with the back of the spoon, and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes. These chewy cookie treats can be stored for two weeks in the refrigerator or six months in the freezer.
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