Modified this recipe for my dog! He gets carsick so I wanted to make a “puppy dramamine” (everyone is very divided on whether you can give dogs ACTUAL dramamine so I figured I would play it safe). Subbed 1 of the tablespoons of pb for grated ginger, and for the water I used brewed chamomile tea. Also I forgot to buy cornmeal so I added another cup of whole wheat flower and it worked fine


I have been cooking for my Boston Terrier for about 4 months now. She kept throwing up every dog food I bought, and it wasn’t cheap food either. I boil whole chicken, and then the rice,buy frozen vegetables, green beans, peas, carrots, spinach, and want to check on adding something else because she is still shedding so bad and can’t figure out why. I give her a multivitamin from GNC for dogs and wondered if she needs something else. When I take her to the vet I’m going to have her checked because she still chokes and throws up but not like with the dog food. She had some throat problems when she was a puppy, he said was tonsillitis, but I’m thinking she has something wrong with her soft palate or stomach. At least making her food is better than having her throw up every day. I do use coconut oil in the recipe. So sweet potatoes or potatoes would be good to add to? I cook all mine up in a big pot and put in quart freezer bags and it lasts a month. I’ve even started giving my bully about 1 cup w/his dry food and he’s got skin problems he’s doing better. Is there something I can use for her hair?
To those of us who love deviled eggs (and we are legion), there is really no occasion that could not be made better by a platter of eggs stuffed with their own whipped yolks. Maybe that’s Easter lunch, their most native habitat, or a work party where everyone — even the most keto-devout! — can fall upon that plate of little morsels. But what about breakfast? Do deviled eggs belong at breakfast? Oh yes. And I have the recipe to prove it.
Soft & chewy Buddy Biscuits are palatable with no crunch. An excellent choice for all dogs, especially older dogs or smaller dogs who prefer a softer treat. Along with indulging your pup, Buddy Soft & Chewy treats are also perfect for training, with a low calorie count and chock full of flavor to keep your dog motivated. Buddy Biscuits are also oven baked in the USA with only quality, recognizable ingredients. Healthy dog treats made with quality ingredients and natural peanut butter. Palatable, chewy dog treats perfect for older dogs. Baked in USA only. Contain no added corn, soy, fillers,artificial colors, flavors and artificial preservatives
Even if you’ve never baked a thing in your life you can make these simple dog treat recipes. It’s hard to go wrong with five ingredients or less, and there’s comfort to be found in knowing exactly what’s going into your dog’s food. I make homemade dog treats when we’re working on any new training behaviors – the extra focus they bring is priceless.

Meet the Buddy Biscuits Family Simple, Crunchy Goodness - Born in 1999, I soon set the standard for oven baked dog treats. With simple ingredients, mouth-watering flavor and a satisfying crunch, I am still a favorite of dogs near and far. Soft & delicious, naturally! The soft texture of these mouth-watering treats makes them perfect for our four-legged friends who prefer a soft treat. We packed them with flavor and simple ingredients, so you’ll love them as much as your dog does. Function meets Delicious - Buddy Boosters offer a boost of glucosamine and chondroitin in every piece and Buddy Trainers are the perfect size for training your pup. These low calorie chews are oven baked and have a delicious soft texture. Naturally Purrr-fect Cat Treats! Our cat treats are made from the quality ingredients you want for your cat, like real meat and wholesome vegetables, with no grains or artificial flavors. SNUGGLEOFFOLOUS - So amazing that we had to create a new word to describe how soft, fluffy, snuggly, and wonderful smelling your dog will be after using our grooming products.
Unless you are hunting and fishing for your dog… The proteins most people use are farmed. Chicken, beef, pork, fish of all varieties, used for human consumtion, are not the same as from the wild. Even “Organic” meats are still grown on farms. This brings about complications from denser populations that wolves and coyotes dont face when they eat raw. Most people agree Kibble is not a great choice…. The question then becomes is it natural to feed your dog raw farmed meat?
I cook for our dogs. We have a 13 year old standard poodle, a yellow lab who is 14 and 2 toy rat terriers. The poodle was seriously sick about a month ago. We did not get a specific diagnosis but he had fever of 107 he did not perk his ears, wag his tail, his rear legs could barely hold him up to pee. He had to be carried out and back in. The only thing he would eat was baked chicken thighs. Now he is back to normal and the lab is sick. Today she was able to get up without assistance one time and twice she was able to get up the 4 steps to the porch. There has been about 2 weeks that she could not get up without assistance She has not had the high fever and both have an occasional huffy cough.
This Easter we were gifted a 22-pound ham (!!!) and while we had our share of Easter feasts, we’ve still got a decent amount left over. I’m not even a little bit mad, because I know I can freeze some for future use and that there are plenty of ways — big and small — that we can use it up this week. Here are 17 of my favorite recipes for using up leftover ham. City hams freeze incredibly well. My suggestion? Freeze the ham in different forms for future use.
An important part of my dog’s diet is the kefir course, which she gets in the morning. The probiotic is important. It is homemade kefir with ground flax seed a little raw oats, and either flax or coconut oil. After that she gets a bowl of chicken or fish or leftover meat from my son’s unfinished meals, dal (chana or split peas or lentils) cooked with quinoa or rice (occasionally) or raw oats with veggies like carrots, small potatoescelery, yams or squash or even blueberries. Long ago with other dogs i fed raw lamb when i first read about homemade dog meals, but it is pricey now.I add greens to the stew but often she removes. Therefore i always add wheatgrass power. She gets oil or butter with every bowl of food, feeding the dal/rice/meat dish 2x day. She also gets vinegar in the dal along with indian spices and garlic. Some day yea some nay on garlic but i thing it is good. No onions or avocados. No chocolate or pizza or pasta. She gets the vinegar to help with itchy skin. The fish is generally raw or lightly poached. Their stomachs were designed to be able to handle raw meat. Sometimes she gets eggs lightly cooked, on the loose runny side. I add good homemade bone broths when cooking dal. I add liverwurst to pigs ears for snackage. I also add iodine drops to her water, which is never tap, except when in the park. I am in search of a non rip off vitamin and appreciate others’ comments herein regarding vitamins. And i always examine her . Not saying perfect but better than the hell of neverending kibble. Sometimes i give her a handful of kibble as a snack. Good to keep a small bag of good stuff for emergencies.
When preparing homemade dog treats, make sure you take into account any allergies that your pet has to specific ingredients. You will want to avoid adding any ingredient that you know that your pet has reacted poorly to in the past. If you are experimenting with new flavors, feed the treat to your dog in a small amount to see how he reacts to it before distributing an entire treat. Store your homemade dog treats in an airtight container and place them in the freezer. Allow the treat to thaw for 10 – 20 minutes prior to serving to your dog. Treats can last for up to 6 months in the freezer.

The Pumpkin dog biscuit recipe is incomplete. It calls for cold water, but does not give you instruction on where/when to use said water. It also calls for you to reserve some of the “rice mixture” but then asks you to add the pumpkin mixture (w egg(s), even though recipe says 1 egg). How then would you reserve the mixture to which you are adding? It also says it makes 24 “balls,” but details instructions to roll out on parchment paper. Just overall very unclear.
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I was wondering about how much to feed my dog. The problem is I see things listing Giant Breeds as 75-100 pounds but my actually Giant of a dog is 165. I would like to transition him to a cooked diet but I don’t want to under or over feed him based on doing the math wrong. Do you have any charts or resources that can help me with an actual giant dog? This would hopefully include both food and vitamins.
Hi Matt, Thanks for your question. You can make sure your dog gets calcium and fatty acids by sprinkling a powdered supplement or drops to your dog’s meals. There are many products on the market. Because the serving size varies widely based on your dog’s weight and other factors, we urge you to consult your vet for the best recommendations for your pup.
For example, substituting one ingredient with another may seem innocent enough when the two ingredients are similar in our eyes, but for a dog’s body this may not be so. When you get a dog food recipe from a reputable source (and you double check with at least 2-3 other reputable sources), it’s important that you follow the recipe to the letter. If you need to substitute, make sure you research or better yet, consult with a canine nutritionist.
Not sure what I did wrong but the dough turned out SOOOOO wet! I ended up adding another 1/2 cup of oats and another 1-1.5 cups of flour before I could work with it! And it was still very gummy. BUT I got it to work and they are now done. They hardened up well still. Just time to cool and let the pooch try them out! I’m sure he will love them but I’m just curious why my dough was so wet? Overall I’m still very happy with the base of this recipe and ingredients as some I’ve seen have me questioning if it’s a good idea to feed some of the ingredients to my pup. I did sub out canola oil for olive oil as well as I didnt have an canola!
The root to such mistakes is usually in the fact that owners assume dogs can eat almost everything we can, and it may be healthy for them. And while it’s true that dogs are omnivores, have stronger stomachs than us (in some ways) and some human foods are extremely good for them, there's a number of food items you should be careful about when preparing your dog’s next dinner.

If you have yet to meet the drop dinner, it’s about time you introduced yourself. The concept? Dump a handful of things into a slow cooker or Instant Pot and let the appliance do all the work. Sure, you may have to chop up a few vegetables or sear a piece of meat in the Instant Pot, but really there’s no work for you beyond that besides grabbing the plates and forks.
I cook for our dogs. We have a 13 year old standard poodle, a yellow lab who is 14 and 2 toy rat terriers. The poodle was seriously sick about a month ago. We did not get a specific diagnosis but he had fever of 107 he did not perk his ears, wag his tail, his rear legs could barely hold him up to pee. He had to be carried out and back in. The only thing he would eat was baked chicken thighs. Now he is back to normal and the lab is sick. Today she was able to get up without assistance one time and twice she was able to get up the 4 steps to the porch. There has been about 2 weeks that she could not get up without assistance She has not had the high fever and both have an occasional huffy cough.
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Bake these healthy treats a shorter time to keep them chewy, or a little longer for a crispy outside and chewy center. Combine a pound of ground beef, turkey or chicken liver with 1 C. corn meal, 1 1/2 C. flour, 1 tsp. anise seed and 1/2 tsp. salt. Spread into a greased baking pan, bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes, and slice into squares when cool. Substitute fennel for anise if needed. Add an egg, or grated apple or carrot for more nutrition and flavor. Any ground organ meat, such as heart, can be used in place of liver. Dogs love these chewy brownies with nearly any kind of meat.
I love this list! First time making dog treats, didn’t have all the ingredients for one recipe so I used this as inspiration. I used peanut butter, eggs, flour, honey, and vegetable broth to make soft, chewy dog biscuits and used a heart cookie cutter. My pugs & chihuahua, and my boyfriend’s goldens loved em! Even tried one myself heheh – turned out like lightly sweetened peanut butter cookies.
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