Not sure what I did wrong but the dough turned out SOOOOO wet! I ended up adding another 1/2 cup of oats and another 1-1.5 cups of flour before I could work with it! And it was still very gummy. BUT I got it to work and they are now done. They hardened up well still. Just time to cool and let the pooch try them out! I’m sure he will love them but I’m just curious why my dough was so wet? Overall I’m still very happy with the base of this recipe and ingredients as some I’ve seen have me questioning if it’s a good idea to feed some of the ingredients to my pup. I did sub out canola oil for olive oil as well as I didnt have an canola!
However, homemade dog food isn’t risk-free either. A 2013 study by the Journal of the American Veterinary Association from a while back showed that more than 90% of homemade dog food recipes found online may be bad for your dog. The study went over 200 recipes from reputable veterinary textbooks and certified veterinary nutritionists, as well as other pet-related sources, and of the 200 recipes, 191 weren’t up to par with the Association’s standards. That’s ~96%!
Modified this recipe for my dog! He gets carsick so I wanted to make a “puppy dramamine” (everyone is very divided on whether you can give dogs ACTUAL dramamine so I figured I would play it safe). Subbed 1 of the tablespoons of pb for grated ginger, and for the water I used brewed chamomile tea. Also I forgot to buy cornmeal so I added another cup of whole wheat flower and it worked fine
Quick question…. I’m considering switching to homemade food for my dogs – one is a senior and one is moderately overweight – so I’m just trying to learn as much as I can. I notice there are certain ingredients listed in the Nutritional Guidelines for Calcium and Fatty Acids but none of the recipes include these things. Are these added as needed or should be part of each recipe? BTW…thank you for the great article and recipe ideas!

One of my three dogs has a very sensitive stomach, so I’ve taken over making meals for him. My typical recipe follows most closely to the beef dinner recipe below. I combine three pounds of 90 percent lean ground beef, frozen peas, and chicken broth in an Instant Pot LUX80 and put it on the Meat/Stew setting for one hour. Separately, I prepare two dry cups of Jasmine rice.
Modified this recipe for my dog! He gets carsick so I wanted to make a “puppy dramamine” (everyone is very divided on whether you can give dogs ACTUAL dramamine so I figured I would play it safe). Subbed 1 of the tablespoons of pb for grated ginger, and for the water I used brewed chamomile tea. Also I forgot to buy cornmeal so I added another cup of whole wheat flower and it worked fine
You’ve been at this “business” a while and it would seem you have heard everything under the sun. As I read your comments above, I noticed how patient and kind you are with each person who comments, even if you’ve said the same thing a hundred times, lol. I’m in marketing, and I’m sure you’ve heard this before, but just wanted to point out that your heading and claim could be considered confusing. I landed on your page following a link, “25 Simple Dog Treat Recipes: 5 Ingredients or less.” When I arrived on your page, the heading said “23 Simple Dog Treat Recipes: 5 Ingredients or less.” Perhaps most people wouldn’t notice that the information doesn’t match, but being a person of integrity, I thought you would want to be aware, so you could adjust the Headline to match the claim. Thank you for caring for those furry friends we love so much!
It’s Earth Day — or Earth Month, as we prefer! — so naturally, we’re turning our focus to the kitchen. And specifically ways we can create less waste and be more efficient and thoughtful with our output. Between packaging and food scraps, some degree of kitchen waste feels inevitable. For most, there’s no way to eliminate it entirely, but there are a lot of small and easy ways to limit the amount of waste coming out of our kitchens.
Hi Audra, in step 5 it says to slowly add the water in. You reserve some of the rice mixture to be used as topping for the cookies at the end. As for it saying egg(s) that was a typo, our apologies, we’ll be sure to fix that. It says it makes 24 1-oz balls to give you an idea that you will get 24 oz of these treats. However, everyone has different size cookie sheets and desired thickness so saying you’ll get 24 treats isn’t very clear because some people may make the treats larger or smaller than others. Sorry this was confusing for you, I hope that clears some of the confusion up. Please let me know if I can help any further.

Hello! I am BRAND new to this and just want to make sure I don’t miss any nutrients my babies need!! I have 2 mini dachshunds and a foster chihuaha, are there any recipes specific for tiny babies? Also, I read something about determining how much of what goes in by their weight. Anyone know HOW to do that/what the equation for that is (Example:weight-10lbs:__×10÷__=


Awesome recipes! Our yellow lab loves the turkey/rice/veggie mix and the chicken jerky strips! Was surprised that our dog loved the rosemary spice in the turkey recipe. Just made the beef/rice meal in the crock pot yesterday and it passed the taste test! Thank you for sharing these great nutritious recipes. Our lab has a lot of energy with these well rounded recipes!
Originally from Chicago, Nicole Janiga joined the Chewy team as a marketing intern in January 2017. Since then, Nicole has continued writing and photographing for Chewy as a Content Collaborator while completing her education at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business. She is majoring in both marketing and corporate innovation, before returning to Chewy as a Marketing Analyst. In her free time, Nicole enjoys traveling, riding her horse or snuggling up with her Pug, @zoetheloaf, and Terrier, Cozmo. 
Awesome recipes! Our yellow lab loves the turkey/rice/veggie mix and the chicken jerky strips! Was surprised that our dog loved the rosemary spice in the turkey recipe. Just made the beef/rice meal in the crock pot yesterday and it passed the taste test! Thank you for sharing these great nutritious recipes. Our lab has a lot of energy with these well rounded recipes!
From fetching his favorite ball to successfully sitting on command, your dog deserves delicious and healthy dog treats. In addition to your verbal praise and affection, there's nothing your dog enjoys more than some mouth-watering rawhide bones or crunchy training treats. Having a natural inclination to please, dogs love to be praised, which is why it's important that they be rewarded with healthy dog biscuits. Healthy dog treats can also add variety to your dog's diet. And because peanut butter dog treats are a fan favorite, they are often available in varieties that provide additional nutritional support under the cloak of their delicious flavor. There are treats enriched with glucosamine to promote better hip and joint health, wheat-grass for better digestion, and more. For dogs with allergies, there are hypoallergenic organic dog treats that are wheat, gluten and corn-free, and even low-calorie treats for less active dogs.
Hi…I just recently started making my own wet food to add to the grain free kibble for my dogs. My older dog seems to have a definite allergy to wheat. We adopted a new dog and in my effort to entice him to eat, I introduced him to a regular wet food with his kibble and let my older one have some as well. Within 2 months, we noticed that he was showing signs of atopic dermititus around his eyes. So now I am making their food with ground turkey, kidney beans, peas, carrots and brown rice and adding some fish oil once it is cooked. Within a week, we are seeing an great improvement to his eyes…plus, they love it! Less expensive than anything from the store!
The safety and effectiveness of a raw food diet is still a point of contention among veterinary professionals. Walkerville Vet recommends the best of both worlds. This recipe is based on the raw food diet of wolves, your dog's natural ancestors. however, it also takes into account the dietary changes in domesticated dogs. It has raw meat as well as cooked carbohydrates and vegetables.
I was thinking the same thing when I read them. I’m no nutritionist, but it is my passion and I’ve been studying human and animal nutrition for a long time. I’m glad somebody pointed this out. Steve, do you have a specific recipe you would use? I thought mine was great, but my dog apparently had sediment build-up in his bladder on a recent ultrasound. The vet hopes it’s just dehydration but thinks it could be his homemade diet. He said the sediment could come from excessive protein (which seems strange because I was just recently thinking his diet may be too carb heavy). Any tips would be awesome!
I am have 4 100+lb dogs I make there food and fix it fresh every meal yes it is time consuming I have one female around 120 or lbs she breaks out after eating her meals in hives and it is worse if given Benadryl she is 3 yrs old I need some help I have changed diet and when I think I have found something that works I delivered these dogs so this is an old problem . HELP
Modified this recipe for my dog! He gets carsick so I wanted to make a “puppy dramamine” (everyone is very divided on whether you can give dogs ACTUAL dramamine so I figured I would play it safe). Subbed 1 of the tablespoons of pb for grated ginger, and for the water I used brewed chamomile tea. Also I forgot to buy cornmeal so I added another cup of whole wheat flower and it worked fine
I’ve been making my own dog food for over a year now. I started when one of my pups got sick and I had to make him a bland diet of chicken and rice. They love the “human food” and I feel good knowing they are getting the healthiest diet possible. I do add the supplement Azestfor to the food to make sure they are getting all their nutrients. If you are questioning if your dog is getting enough supplements I would definitely recommend using it. 🙂
Lifting the Cut Outs - Once you have cut out as many dog biscuits as you can, it's time to transfer the cookies to the baking sheet. Start by pulling away the excess dough from around the cut outs. Place the unused dough back into your bowl to be rolled out. Gently lift the cookie away from the parchment paper or flour covered surface with a metal or thin spatula.

Lifting the Cut Outs - Once you have cut out as many dog biscuits as you can, it's time to transfer the cookies to the baking sheet. Start by pulling away the excess dough from around the cut outs. Place the unused dough back into your bowl to be rolled out. Gently lift the cookie away from the parchment paper or flour covered surface with a metal or thin spatula.
Dog treats serve a number of useful purposes. They help satisfy your dog’s need to chew, and they’re an indispensable part of training, especially for food-motivated pups. Crunchy dog biscuits and smaller treats can be given as dog training treats or everyday snacks to strengthen the bond between you and your pet. Long-lasting dog treats are great for special occasions. They can help reduce stress as your dog chews or keep her occupied when guests visit. Every pup loves good natural dog bones or bully sticks, and naturally shed antlers for dogs will keep your dogs chewing happily for hours. Chewy also contains a wide range of dog treats including dental chews dog treats, soft dog treats, dog jerky treats, freeze dried dog treats, prescription dog treats, dehydrated dog treats and more. Treat-dispensing dog toys can add another layer of chewing fun. Get the best dog treats, pet food online at Chewy!

My daughter volunteers at a dog rescue and we want to make several different batches and bring them to share in celebrating her birthday in a couple months. I LOVE the variety of recipes and especially ones for those dogs with grain allergies or that are diabetic! My question is, will the treats still be good if we make ahead of time and freeze them until closer to the big day? Sadly, I’m not much of a cook so I am not familiar with what freezes well and what wouldn’t.
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