Hi I am new to this site and have an Anatolian Sheperd and a Heinz 57 that I am going to start supplementing their kibble with your great recipes. I have a question on the yogurt and since I know it is a great probiotic how is it that dogs can eat it and not have digestive issues since it is dairy? My big guy weighs about 110 lbs and the gal about 60. She can eat anything he has a sensitive gut and I have been told a little yogurt wil help. Thanks
If your pup loves to chew, make your own chew strips with fresh chicken. Slice chicken breasts into 1/8" thick strips and dehydrate in an oven set to 200 degrees Fahrenheit for about two hours, or until the chicken is dried and chewy. Sprinkle with anise prior to drying for extra flavor. Turkey also can be substituted. Poultry chews make a nice alternative to rawhide treats, which could contain chemicals or preservatives. Store extra chews in the refrigerator or freezer. Chicken jerky can also be made in the microwave by cooking the strips for 20 minutes on medium power until they are chewy.
When preparing homemade dog treats, make sure you take into account any allergies that your pet has to specific ingredients. You will want to avoid adding any ingredient that you know that your pet has reacted poorly to in the past. If you are experimenting with new flavors, feed the treat to your dog in a small amount to see how he reacts to it before distributing an entire treat. Store your homemade dog treats in an airtight container and place them in the freezer. Allow the treat to thaw for 10 – 20 minutes prior to serving to your dog. Treats can last for up to 6 months in the freezer.

Hi Matt, Thanks for your question. You can make sure your dog gets calcium and fatty acids by sprinkling a powdered supplement or drops to your dog’s meals. There are many products on the market. Because the serving size varies widely based on your dog’s weight and other factors, we urge you to consult your vet for the best recommendations for your pup.


This post totally cracked me up! Mainly because I have been thinking of making little pup treats for 2 weeks now. I’ve been hooked on Diane’s Gingie cookies (see OvenHug for the best gingie recipe eh=vah) and making them non-stop. Our finicky little chihuahua mix loves sharing bites with me. I want to make a gluten free version of my gingies so that our senior pup, Oscar can also join us – he has sensitive tummy issues. I just need to find a bone shaped cookie cutter and we’re in business. Thanks for the laughs. Your pup cookies look amazin’! Thanks for sharing. xo
“In 2015, the World Health Organization found that processed meats such as bacon and sausage were known carcinogens linked to cancer. Bacon is an incredibly rich and fatty food with a high salt content, which can prove to be too much for a dog’s stomach to handle. Eating a large amount can cause pancreatitis, which can be fatal.” [http://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/natural-foods/can-dogs-eat-pork/]”
If your pup loves to chew, make your own chew strips with fresh chicken. Slice chicken breasts into 1/8" thick strips and dehydrate in an oven set to 200 degrees Fahrenheit for about two hours, or until the chicken is dried and chewy. Sprinkle with anise prior to drying for extra flavor. Turkey also can be substituted. Poultry chews make a nice alternative to rawhide treats, which could contain chemicals or preservatives. Store extra chews in the refrigerator or freezer. Chicken jerky can also be made in the microwave by cooking the strips for 20 minutes on medium power until they are chewy.
One of his favorite meals is chicken baked in a little water, no spices, salt or pepper, added to some steamed carrots, sweet potato, acorn squash, broccoli some raspberries and blue berries. I usually make enough for 2 meals per day for 5 days. Everything I’ve learned says keep in the fridge no more than 3-5 days….so I push it a bit with the 5 days.I hope what I’ve learned will help someone. I suggest doing a lot of research, it seems that feeding our loved little pets can harm them if we feed them the wrong things over a period of time.
This dog treat recipe is perfect if you’ve got some fun cookie cutters on hand. And since it’s peanut butter based it’s pretty much guaranteed to be a hit with your dog. I have yet to meet a dog who doesn’t go bonkers for PB. For this recipe you’ll need 2 cups of whole wheat flout, 1 tablespoon baking powder, 1 cup unsalted natural peanut butter and 1 cup skim milk.
I’ve raised my Shih Tzu since he was 10 weeks old, and he is currently 3 years old. Everyday he eats a different fruit/vegetable, typically with chicken, but he also occasionally he eats salmon, beef, pork (very sparingly since it can cause worms), and turkey. He also eats lentils, rice, beans, and oatmeal. I also add eggshell powder, nutritional yeast, Vitamin C, a small amount of garlic, and fish oil to their food. Variety is good — they need it to get proper nutrition. I’ve never had any dietary problems with him, his skin is healthy and he is energetic. I recently adopted a 8 yr old Llasa Aapso who was religiously fed so called high quality grain free kibble his entire life (I know this because I am related to the prior owner). He developed chronically itchy skin (with blisters and black scar tissue from scratching), and his owners did not know what to do with him. I immediately switched him over to a home made diet (like my Shih Tzu) and he immediately improved. I did give him the anti-fungal, anti-bacterial medication and prednisone the vet prescribed to initially improve (but not get rid of) his skin condition. The vet wanted me to give him the prescription diet and cortisone shots to keep the condition at bay. However, I refused because I know personally based on my own diet changes (I used to be 100+ pounds overweight and I lost it by eating better—not less— food) how feeding your body higher quality food can drastically change your condition. It has been a couple of months, and the Llasa is almost unrecognizable. I truly believe that feeding dogs commercially prepared dog foods leads to many ailments down the road. No human doctor would prescribe eating Total cereal, and a multivitamin to obtain optimum or even mediocre health. I don’t know why people think it is any different for animals and kibble (even high quality ones).
If your pup loves to chew, make your own chew strips with fresh chicken. Slice chicken breasts into 1/8" thick strips and dehydrate in an oven set to 200 degrees Fahrenheit for about two hours, or until the chicken is dried and chewy. Sprinkle with anise prior to drying for extra flavor. Turkey also can be substituted. Poultry chews make a nice alternative to rawhide treats, which could contain chemicals or preservatives. Store extra chews in the refrigerator or freezer. Chicken jerky can also be made in the microwave by cooking the strips for 20 minutes on medium power until they are chewy.
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All of the above dog food recipes will be deficient in many essential nutrients. There is no significant source of calcium or adequate sources of micronutrients such as B vitamins, vitamin D, etc. In addition to lacking calcium, the calcium:phosphorus ratio is an important consideration. Please consult your veterinarian before feeding any home diet. These are not adequate!!
I’m assuming you are changing over to a homemade diet because you have health concerns related to commercially produced dog food. Please research the contents of ALL commercial foods. You will be appalled. It ranges in offensiveness from low quality, to poisonous and downright carcinogenic. Proteins are frequently comprised of beaks, feathers, and high temperature steamed bonemeal. The most common source of “animal protein” is actually a meal that is produced using euthanized, ill farm and COMPANION animals…..as well as the medications that were in their systems when they were eventually determined to be terminal. There are a multitude of articles online with which you can educate yourself about the heinous nature of commercial dog food (yes, even the “premium” foods) so I guess the short answer is…..NO, if you care about what your dog is eating, don’t feed anything that you purchase human grade ingredients and prepare yourself! Btw, organic is best if you can afford it. The chemicals in human food are just as detrimental to your dog as they are for you, although having a shorter lifespan, they obviously won’t suffer some of the cumulative affects that humans do.

The quality of meat you’re using is essential for the long-term health of your dog. Yes, very cheap commercial dog food is rarely made out of high-quality ingredients either, but that’s nevertheless a problem that you too must be wary of when you’re cooking your own dog’s dinner. It's time consuming to be picky about the ingredients you'll use in your Fido's meal, but something that cannot be avoided.

Hi Kathy! I believe there was a link toward the beginning of the article but, for a puppy, the general rule (from what I understand) is 1/2 a cup for every 5 pounds of weight. So, if your pup weighs 15 pounds, you’d feed it 1 1/2 cups a day, ideally splitting it into three servings (most commonly 7am, 12pm, and 5pm) of 1/2 a cup. I hope I helped you out a bit!
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