Hi, I have a 2.4yr old st.bernard.since past yr i feed him homemade food as he was becoming sick with store brought kibbles.I give him rice,pulses, chicken/lamb and atleast 1 type of vegetable everyday, with glenand dog biscuits as treats. But since a puppy he has a skin allergy(with itching) which goes away with lotions/creams but keep on reoccurring every now & then. Can u pls suggest a better diet that help him with healthy skin.

I tried to make the Beef Stew and the recipe had me confused (easy to do ). In the listing of ingredients, it says 1/2 cup of flour, and “ 1/2 cup water or organic vegetable oil, plus 1 Tablespoon vegetable oil for frying.” So is that correct? 1/2 cup of water OR 1/2 cup of oil?? Isn’t that kind of a lot of oil? Anyway, I tried the 1/2 cup of water and with 1/2 cup of flour, this became a big ball of yuck. What did I do wrong??

There aren't a lot of soft treats suitable for older dogs that have few remaining teeth, mine is such a dog...she loves them...I looked at the soft treats found in the store, many, many of them oddly contain garlic which is listed as bad for dogs....using such treats not knowing that, mine lost a 3" patch of fur...I threw them away and switched to this treat as well as ceaser treats...her fur has grown back and all seems well...as for flavor, I gave them a 5, not because I have eaten them but again, my dog likes them lol

Modified this recipe for my dog! He gets carsick so I wanted to make a “puppy dramamine” (everyone is very divided on whether you can give dogs ACTUAL dramamine so I figured I would play it safe). Subbed 1 of the tablespoons of pb for grated ginger, and for the water I used brewed chamomile tea. Also I forgot to buy cornmeal so I added another cup of whole wheat flower and it worked fine
Separately, I noticed a lot of negative comments on here about the recipes. Dogs have lived with humans for thousands and thousands of years. They ate what humans ate and thrived, including grains, veggies, fruits, meats and bones. Dogs are more like scavengers and adapt to eating whatever food is available. There is a lot of misconception out there for what kind of food is best, things are usually based on whatever fad is current. Right now paleo and ketogenic diets are popular and you can see that reflected in people’s opinions for dog food. However, some of the oldest living dogs were fed vegan diets— not advocating, just saying. People have a tendency to jump on band wagons without much real evidence to support them. Then after some time, it comes out why that band wagon wasn’t so great after all. The key seems to be to get them off kibble and onto fresh healthy foods and to be balanced. Even the Canine Cancer Series, referenced in another comment, mentioned the need to add fresh veggies to dog food. They said just adding fresh veggies alone to kibble reduced a dog’s cancer risk by a significant amount.
Quick question…. I’m considering switching to homemade food for my dogs – one is a senior and one is moderately overweight – so I’m just trying to learn as much as I can. I notice there are certain ingredients listed in the Nutritional Guidelines for Calcium and Fatty Acids but none of the recipes include these things. Are these added as needed or should be part of each recipe? BTW…thank you for the great article and recipe ideas!
You can also find other additives to toss in to ensure your dog gets all the nutrients he needs, like Nupro Dog Supplement or Wiz Pet Multi Goodness. These supplements will ensure your dog’s homemade diet is well balanced and good for them. For even more recipes than we’ve outlined in this post, we’ve suggested dog cookbooks after each recipe so you can test out other feasts.
There are a couple ways that you can do this recipe to make it more fun and interesting for you and your dog. You can either cook the meat and rice/lentils/quinoa up in a pot with water and add the vegetables near the end of cooking. The other option is to cook the rice/lentils/quinoa and vegetables until soft, mix everything together with the raw beef and form them into meatballs. Cook meatballs at 400 degrees for about 45 minutes, or until fully cooked.
Find out from your vet how much insulin she needs for 10 grams of carbohydrate. Then to the chicken or other meats add turnip greens and sweet potatoes. You might add a small amount of rice Cook the rice in 7 times more water than rice. ( 1 cup of rice to 7 cups of water or 1/4 cup rice to 1 and 3/4 cups if water. 1/2 cup rice to 3 1/2 cups water. I know every rice chart says less but dogs like it better with more water AND dogs drink less water if there is more in the rice.
This dog treat recipe is perfect if you’ve got some fun cookie cutters on hand. And since it’s peanut butter based it’s pretty much guaranteed to be a hit with your dog. I have yet to meet a dog who doesn’t go bonkers for PB. For this recipe you’ll need 2 cups of whole wheat flout, 1 tablespoon baking powder, 1 cup unsalted natural peanut butter and 1 cup skim milk.
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