I just started making food for my 10 yr. old lab. Here goes: 2 lbs hamburger 1 lb chicken hearts and gizzards, 1/2 lb beef liver, 8 cups brown rice, large can of collard greens, small can of pumpkin, small can of peas and carrots, 1/2 cup blueberries. I chop up the liverand gizzards. Put it all in 16 cups of water and boli for 20 minutes. I vary the veggies and fruit. She weighs about 90 lbs and needs to lose weight so I feed her 2 lbs a day. I add chia seeds when feeding. 21/4 t a day. She was a picky eater before so she got way too many human food treats. Now she gobbles down her food and no more begging. Just started so I might have to adjust her serving size.
Treat your pup to a festive meal around the holidays with this recipe from VetCo. It utilizes a lot of leftover ingredients you'll find on your dining room table. The ingredients are safe for your dog. You can whip this meal up in only a few minutes and spoil your canine companion. The recipe makes a lot of food, so you'll need to portion it out based on your dog's size.
To those of us who love deviled eggs (and we are legion), there is really no occasion that could not be made better by a platter of eggs stuffed with their own whipped yolks. Maybe that’s Easter lunch, their most native habitat, or a work party where everyone — even the most keto-devout! — can fall upon that plate of little morsels. But what about breakfast? Do deviled eggs belong at breakfast? Oh yes. And I have the recipe to prove it.
I don’t feel grains or occasionally having certain kinds of fermented dairy are necessarily that bad. They have been in human diets, and therefore dog diets, for thousands of years without harm. I think goat dairy is supposed to be more digestible for dogs and humans if someone is insistent on that kind of a product. But, for whatever reason you want to choose, there are digestive issues coming out in our day to these products that have not existed before and so some care isn’t necessarily unwarranted. Balance is always key.

I have a 9 year old toy poodle mix and a 5 year old shih tzu- and they are very finicky so I started cooking for them and my vet was okay with it. I make either turkey or chicken I use brown rice, green peas ,green beans, carrots, zucchini, pumpkin/ or sweet potatoes and sometimes broccoli and cauliflower. I cook the ground meat with olive oil then cut and boil all vegetables let both sit then cook rice. I mix everything together and I will add a can of dog pumpkin (low in sugar) I make a big pot and freeze in big freezer 1 gallon bag which is 1 week for both dogs. I usually cook once a month. My dogs love it they lick the plates. Seems happier. I also saw where people are worried about calcium, well I give my dogs every morning 3 tablespoon of goat milk for each dog. It does take about an hour or so to complete the receipt but worth it. My dogs haven’t gained weight and because of all the water in vegetables they hardly drink water which they drank so much with commercial food. It makes me so happy to see them happy
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In the past food was left out for them and some would be thrown out next morning which I assumed was a sign they were getting plenty but now they clean everything up and show like I said a remarkable change the youngest is a 3-year-old little cross Jack Russel/Shitzu and she has always had coarse hair and I would say a thin frame but never looked starving just excepted as being small framed she now has a smooth coat and apart from her name “spud” as she looked like a baked potato with a tail ( I wanted to call her Gizmo after the gremlin with her satellite dish ears) when we got her as a rescue pup you would not believe its the same dog, she was always happy with a none stop wagging tail and looked healthy but she looks so much healthier and both of them seem different in themselves in a way I can’t explain but for the better.
When your pooch refuses to eat commercial dog food, be it dry or canned, then sooner or later you might be faced with a problem: you won't have any prepared DIY homemade dog food meals on hand (due to lack of time or whatnot) at home and your canine may be refusing to eat anything else. Fortunately, this is relatively easy to avoid by feeding your dog some commercial dog food from time to time from an early age.
“Quality control” doesn’t have a nice ring to it – anyone involved in the manufacturing of pet foods, pet medicine or other pet products that require quality control and monitoring by agencies like FDA and USDA do not want to hear about it, because it increases costs. This is why companies that make human-grade dog food and have frequent factory inspections (like The Honest Kitchen) have to raise costs for their pet food products.

To those of us who love deviled eggs (and we are legion), there is really no occasion that could not be made better by a platter of eggs stuffed with their own whipped yolks. Maybe that’s Easter lunch, their most native habitat, or a work party where everyone — even the most keto-devout! — can fall upon that plate of little morsels. But what about breakfast? Do deviled eggs belong at breakfast? Oh yes. And I have the recipe to prove it.
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