Dogs, wolves, anyone can get salmonella poisoning. It’s what they call survival of the fittest. We don’t exactly keep track of the wolves that are dying and surviving. Plus, their bodies are quite used to it. And as Dawn said below, our dogs are not wild anymore. With children around the house and the way our dogs kiss us/sleep on the bed, I would not feed our dogs raw diet because as we evolve, so do our domesticated dogs. I completely agree that kibble is a big no, but would not feed my dogs raw either.


The easiest way is to throw everything in a large slow cooker. 5 pounds regular ground beef, 3 pounds chopped beef liver, three cups of frozen or fresh veg and/or fruit, (carrots, peas, butternut squash, broccoli, blueberry, pumpkin etc.) 4 cups parboiled rice, 8 cups of water. 5 hours on high, longer on low and its done. A weeks worth in the fridge in what it was cooked in for an 80 lb dog. (substitute liver with any other organ, or rice with oats, quinoa, egg noodles, rice noodles).
Kitchn’s Delicious Links column highlights recipes we’re excited about from the bloggers we love. Follow along every weekday as we post our favorites.Flank steak is a great way to mix up proteins during the week, so your dinner isn’t all chicken, every day. It’s a comparatively inexpensive cut of beef, and I find it way easier to cook than chicken, because you don’t need to worry nearly as much about getting the meat to the exact right temperature.
I’ve raised my Shih Tzu since he was 10 weeks old, and he is currently 3 years old. Everyday he eats a different fruit/vegetable, typically with chicken, but he also occasionally he eats salmon, beef, pork (very sparingly since it can cause worms), and turkey. He also eats lentils, rice, beans, and oatmeal. I also add eggshell powder, nutritional yeast, Vitamin C, a small amount of garlic, and fish oil to their food. Variety is good — they need it to get proper nutrition. I’ve never had any dietary problems with him, his skin is healthy and he is energetic. I recently adopted a 8 yr old Llasa Aapso who was religiously fed so called high quality grain free kibble his entire life (I know this because I am related to the prior owner). He developed chronically itchy skin (with blisters and black scar tissue from scratching), and his owners did not know what to do with him. I immediately switched him over to a home made diet (like my Shih Tzu) and he immediately improved. I did give him the anti-fungal, anti-bacterial medication and prednisone the vet prescribed to initially improve (but not get rid of) his skin condition. The vet wanted me to give him the prescription diet and cortisone shots to keep the condition at bay. However, I refused because I know personally based on my own diet changes (I used to be 100+ pounds overweight and I lost it by eating better—not less— food) how feeding your body higher quality food can drastically change your condition. It has been a couple of months, and the Llasa is almost unrecognizable. I truly believe that feeding dogs commercially prepared dog foods leads to many ailments down the road. No human doctor would prescribe eating Total cereal, and a multivitamin to obtain optimum or even mediocre health. I don’t know why people think it is any different for animals and kibble (even high quality ones).
I am making food for my 7 year old shih tzu. I have read books and am putting in 1/4 tea egg shells for calcium and some chicken liver with the meat, vegetables and rice or other grain I use to make the food. Would I need to add a supplement? What do you suggest? My Vet was concerned about me making the food. After a scare with a recall that I did not know about until months after my dog was having problems, I cannot imaging that the canned food I used is better for my dog. But, I want to make the food and make it the best I can. Thank you.
Their health has improved visibly. The one that was prone to overweight slimmed right down. The one that was picky is now a chow hound. And best of all the one that had quit eating and was at death’s door is still with us – she was the original inspiration to start cooking. I vary the protein, the grains, and the veggies but the basic recipe holds. I’ll never go back to that canned slop!
Dogs, wolves, anyone can get salmonella poisoning. It’s what they call survival of the fittest. We don’t exactly keep track of the wolves that are dying and surviving. Plus, their bodies are quite used to it. And as Dawn said below, our dogs are not wild anymore. With children around the house and the way our dogs kiss us/sleep on the bed, I would not feed our dogs raw diet because as we evolve, so do our domesticated dogs. I completely agree that kibble is a big no, but would not feed my dogs raw either.
I’ve been making these for a long time now. My dog, Lola, knows by the smell when I’m baking for her and is in the kitchen the whole time! To make it easier, I use a pizza cutter and make 1x3” long strips instead of the bone shape. It is much faster with less rolling and these strips fit very nicely into Lola’s Kong. I use all natural peanut butter, and if I remember, get it freshly ground at the grocery store. I also buy the real Ceylon cinnamon to avoid any coumarin overdose if I give her too many treats.
Hi I hope your dog is eating now but if not I have a recommendation for you, my 8 month puppy stop eating kibble so I started cooking for him, this is my first dog so I don’t have so much experience. Weel after some months eating cook chicken with vegetables and other snacks he stopped eating again I think he got bored (again) so I bought greek gods greek yogurt (plain) and he love his food again, maybe you can try something like this.

“In 2015, the World Health Organization found that processed meats such as bacon and sausage were known carcinogens linked to cancer. Bacon is an incredibly rich and fatty food with a high salt content, which can prove to be too much for a dog’s stomach to handle. Eating a large amount can cause pancreatitis, which can be fatal.” [http://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/natural-foods/can-dogs-eat-pork/]”


To those of us who love deviled eggs (and we are legion), there is really no occasion that could not be made better by a platter of eggs stuffed with their own whipped yolks. Maybe that’s Easter lunch, their most native habitat, or a work party where everyone — even the most keto-devout! — can fall upon that plate of little morsels. But what about breakfast? Do deviled eggs belong at breakfast? Oh yes. And I have the recipe to prove it.
Deviled eggs are one of the most universally loved apps and snacks. Put a plate down at any holiday get-together or gathering and it’s all but guaranteed they’ll be gobbled up in no time. I’m a purist at heart who believes you can never go wrong with the classic creamy, mustard-spiked filling, although there’s a nearly endless variety of ways to dress up and reinvent these two-bite snacks. Here are 10 of our favorite deviled recipe ideas to consider.
​This is a different type of recipe, in fact there's no real recipe here at all. This is more instruction on how to construct your own recipe using optimal ingredients for a properly nutrtionally balanced meal. They have sources several scientific studies and even vet endorsed sample diets in order to give you a better idea of what's suitable for your dog - a highly recommend you give this a read.
The quality of meat you’re using is essential for the long-term health of your dog. Yes, very cheap commercial dog food is rarely made out of high-quality ingredients either, but that’s nevertheless a problem that you too must be wary of when you’re cooking your own dog’s dinner. It's time consuming to be picky about the ingredients you'll use in your Fido's meal, but something that cannot be avoided.

Just because humans eat dairy does not make it a healthy food for dogs. You can find anything online to agree with a particular viewpoint. I would say cow’s milk is a species inappropriate food for both dogs AND humans— that’s my online viewpoint. 😉 Each dog may have minor variances from each other, but each dog is not THAT unique. Both humans and dogs seem to adapt to whatever they eat, but that doesn’t mean that what they are eating is exactly the best for them. Dogs can’t tell us when they don’t feel well after eating something. And unfortunately, a lot of dietary intolerances come out as health issues down the road instead of being an immediate reaction.
There aren't a lot of soft treats suitable for older dogs that have few remaining teeth, mine is such a dog...she loves them...I looked at the soft treats found in the store, many, many of them oddly contain garlic which is listed as bad for dogs....using such treats not knowing that, mine lost a 3" patch of fur...I threw them away and switched to this treat as well as ceaser treats...her fur has grown back and all seems well...as for flavor, I gave them a 5, not because I have eaten them but again, my dog likes them lol
It’s Earth Day — or Earth Month, as we prefer! — so naturally, we’re turning our focus to the kitchen. And specifically ways we can create less waste and be more efficient and thoughtful with our output. Between packaging and food scraps, some degree of kitchen waste feels inevitable. For most, there’s no way to eliminate it entirely, but there are a lot of small and easy ways to limit the amount of waste coming out of our kitchens.
I have a 5 month old puppy who will not eat unless beyond starving, I have tried every brand of dog food on the market, wet and dry. Making my own was the only choice I was left with and she eats a different meal every day. Dogs only get “sensitive” to food if you stick with one kind morning, noon and night, then they have issues. If they have a varied diet from young, they have no problems. Mine has boundless energy perfect poos, glossy coat and bright eyes.
I tried to make the Beef Stew and the recipe had me confused (easy to do ). In the listing of ingredients, it says 1/2 cup of flour, and “ 1/2 cup water or organic vegetable oil, plus 1 Tablespoon vegetable oil for frying.” So is that correct? 1/2 cup of water OR 1/2 cup of oil?? Isn’t that kind of a lot of oil? Anyway, I tried the 1/2 cup of water and with 1/2 cup of flour, this became a big ball of yuck. What did I do wrong??

Hi Christi, I actually came here baking advice. Your cookies look awesome. I make my own also and am trying to make a business out of it but I’m having trouble as I am a real amatuer baker. My ingredients are 3 cups wheat flour, 2 tsp baking powder, 2 eggs, 1/2 cup chicken broth, 1/2 cup rolled oats, 1/4 sweet potato and 1 cup of pumkin. Bake 350 for 1/2 hr then rest in cooling oven 1 hr. They come out crunchy like i want but easilly broken. When rolling out the dough it is very dry and big cracks around the edge. Very labor intensive to get a batch baked!
I have a 9 year old toy poodle mix and a 5 year old shih tzu- and they are very finicky so I started cooking for them and my vet was okay with it. I make either turkey or chicken I use brown rice, green peas ,green beans, carrots, zucchini, pumpkin/ or sweet potatoes and sometimes broccoli and cauliflower. I cook the ground meat with olive oil then cut and boil all vegetables let both sit then cook rice. I mix everything together and I will add a can of dog pumpkin (low in sugar) I make a big pot and freeze in big freezer 1 gallon bag which is 1 week for both dogs. I usually cook once a month. My dogs love it they lick the plates. Seems happier. I also saw where people are worried about calcium, well I give my dogs every morning 3 tablespoon of goat milk for each dog. It does take about an hour or so to complete the receipt but worth it. My dogs haven’t gained weight and because of all the water in vegetables they hardly drink water which they drank so much with commercial food. It makes me so happy to see them happy
Hi…I just recently started making my own wet food to add to the grain free kibble for my dogs. My older dog seems to have a definite allergy to wheat. We adopted a new dog and in my effort to entice him to eat, I introduced him to a regular wet food with his kibble and let my older one have some as well. Within 2 months, we noticed that he was showing signs of atopic dermititus around his eyes. So now I am making their food with ground turkey, kidney beans, peas, carrots and brown rice and adding some fish oil once it is cooked. Within a week, we are seeing an great improvement to his eyes…plus, they love it! Less expensive than anything from the store!

Treat your pup to a festive meal around the holidays with this recipe from VetCo. It utilizes a lot of leftover ingredients you'll find on your dining room table. The ingredients are safe for your dog. You can whip this meal up in only a few minutes and spoil your canine companion. The recipe makes a lot of food, so you'll need to portion it out based on your dog's size.
This homemade dog treat recipe is perfect for novice cooks (myself included). If you’re interested in making some super simple dog treats I’d recommend starting out with this easy recipe. The only ingredients you need are 2 cups of organic whole wheat flour and 2 jars of pureed baby food. For the baby food I’ve found Laika loves blueberry, beef and sweet potato.
×