​No Crockpot?  No problem - just make a potato beef stew with whatever pot you have around the kitchen, your dog will appreciate the effort all the same. Amanda even takes it a step further and supplements her dog food with extra dog vitamins, which is a great idea. Just make sure you talk to the Vet first so they can receive the optimal level of nutrients needed for your dog.
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Actually, it is only the skin and pit of avocados that dogs shouldn’t eat. The skin contains “persin”, and this is a toxin for dogs. The pit, obviously, is dangerous because a dog could easily ingest it. However, the actual “meat” of the avocado is great for a dog because it is a superfood. An avocado is a wonderful source of pantothenic acid, dietary fiber, vitamin K, copper, folate, vitamin B6, potassium, vitamin E, vitamin C, and typically contains 30 grams of fat, but 20 of these fat grams are health-promoting monounsaturated fats, especially oleic acid.
That is a great question, Teresa! From what we’ve found, there is no nutritional requirement for wheat in a dog’s diet, but there are benefits to its presence. Certain wheats contain fibers that help the grown of beneficial bacteria in the gut or intestines. Fiber found in wheat helps keep your dog’s bowel movements regular. Older dogs are more susceptible to develop constipation, so an increase in fiber can help keep things moving. Wheat also packs a burst of energy, the carbs found in wheat grain are great for fueling muscular and metabolic activities.

Thank you to the readers who have mentioned the issue with using bacon fat for dogs. A trace amount of bacon grease (two tablespoons divided amongst 30 biscuits = less than 1 gram of bacon fat per serving) shouldn’t be a concern. Of course, we’re not veterinarians over here, so please check with your vet or use an alternative type of oil if you are concerned.
The root to such mistakes is usually in the fact that owners assume dogs can eat almost everything we can, and it may be healthy for them. And while it’s true that dogs are omnivores, have stronger stomachs than us (in some ways) and some human foods are extremely good for them, there's a number of food items you should be careful about when preparing your dog’s next dinner.
It’s also common to find by-products and fillers (check the labels of any treats you might have in the cupboard) in dog biscuits rather than natural, organic or high-quality ingredients. When you make small batches of your own doggie biscuits, there’s no need for extra additives or preservatives, another great reason to tie on an apron and get creative in the kitchen.
Dogs of all ages, from puppies to seniors, enjoy treats. Dog treats are a wonderful way to bond with your pet, give them something to chew on, reward them for good behavior or just to see them jump for joy. You'll find all their favorites at PetSmart, where we carry a wide selection of top brands. Snacks can even be part of their healthy diet every day, if used sparingly. Dental chews help keep their teeth clean and their gums healthy. Even pups with food sensitivities have a selection of gluten free, grain free, and natural dog treats to choose from. With real meaty bones, flavored dental treats, crunchy cookies and baked goods, rawhide, puppy treats and more, finding something they'll love is simple.
I made some homemade food for my 2 Labrador dogs. I made a 2 canners full using meat trimmings when we butchered our deer and elk. I added only 1 cup of brown rice to each canner of meat and a bag of chopped carrots to each. I have been using Rachel Ray dry dog food – 3 cups per dog and 1/2 cup of my home made food per day . The dogs are producing an ENORMOUS amount of poop! Is it the combo of the 2 & will it stop once I run out of the dry food? My husband is going nuts!
Hi…I just recently started making my own wet food to add to the grain free kibble for my dogs. My older dog seems to have a definite allergy to wheat. We adopted a new dog and in my effort to entice him to eat, I introduced him to a regular wet food with his kibble and let my older one have some as well. Within 2 months, we noticed that he was showing signs of atopic dermititus around his eyes. So now I am making their food with ground turkey, kidney beans, peas, carrots and brown rice and adding some fish oil once it is cooked. Within a week, we are seeing an great improvement to his eyes…plus, they love it! Less expensive than anything from the store!
I started cooking for my three German Shepherds about 6 months ago, after a lot of frustration with diarrhea, allergies and other issues. Within a few days the diarrhea ended, then a few weeks later I noticed they were shedding less and not scratching anymore. One of my dogs had allergies so bad she needed injections every 8 weeks or she’d scratch her ears raw. Now she no longer needs the shots. They’re all pooping a small fraction of what they used to, so that means everything they’re eating is being used. Their coats are shiny and even strangers have commented on how healthy they look. I will never go back to commercial dog food. And they all LOVE the food!!! Now I need to add some homemade kibble to their diet.
The food isn’t for your kid it’s for your dog. Dogs don’t need sweets, but some foods need to be mushy for them to be able to digest it. May I suggest you take a look at the ingredients in your store bought dog food and notice all the uses of the word ‘meal’ it may taste better to your kids, but I guarantee you it’s not as good for your dog as homemade.
Opened my eyes and had the realization that it can’t be healthy to eat slimy, greasy canned meat and meat-flavored cereal every day of your life and no wonder at 6 months, my pup is already refusing to eat even the highest top shelf dog foods… I haven’t even switched his diet for a full week yet and his stool is finally firm. No more diarrhea. His eyes are brighter and twinkling brighter than I’ve ever seen before. He’s excited to eat. He jumped up and down. It’s so worth the time and effort and is cheaper than the expensive can food. He still gets a sprinkle of kibble in his food just to make sure he isn’t lacking any minerals or vitamins. I regret not doing it sooner…
I have 3 dogs, a border collie, poodle mix and a daschund. They get along very well and we take them daily for at least an hour and 1/2 walk. Lately though, the two smaller ones refuse to eat at their normal feeding time. Dennis, the collie, happily eats, but Teddy and Murdog shiver and hide. I work from home and make their gravy from fresh veg. We spend plenty time together and they are loved and very well taken care of. Why have the little ones behaviour changed so drastically in such a short time?
This Easter we were gifted a 22-pound ham (!!!) and while we had our share of Easter feasts, we’ve still got a decent amount left over. I’m not even a little bit mad, because I know I can freeze some for future use and that there are plenty of ways — big and small — that we can use it up this week. Here are 17 of my favorite recipes for using up leftover ham. City hams freeze incredibly well. My suggestion? Freeze the ham in different forms for future use.
Feeding your dog a DIY homemade dog food is something that more and more dog owners are doing these days. It’s understandable as many of us are becoming aware of the shady manufacturing practices in the pet food industry, filler ingredients, fake “Made in USA” labels and other things harmful to our pets. Using homemade dog food recipes is a way to let your pooch enjoy the finer things in life, in particular high-quality and delicious meat.

I have been cooking for my Boston Terrier for about 4 months now. She kept throwing up every dog food I bought, and it wasn’t cheap food either. I boil whole chicken, and then the rice,buy frozen vegetables, green beans, peas, carrots, spinach, and want to check on adding something else because she is still shedding so bad and can’t figure out why. I give her a multivitamin from GNC for dogs and wondered if she needs something else. When I take her to the vet I’m going to have her checked because she still chokes and throws up but not like with the dog food. She had some throat problems when she was a puppy, he said was tonsillitis, but I’m thinking she has something wrong with her soft palate or stomach. At least making her food is better than having her throw up every day. I do use coconut oil in the recipe. So sweet potatoes or potatoes would be good to add to? I cook all mine up in a big pot and put in quart freezer bags and it lasts a month. I’ve even started giving my bully about 1 cup w/his dry food and he’s got skin problems he’s doing better. Is there something I can use for her hair?
I have a very obes,e dog, Jack Russell named Charlie. His owner ,myself experienced an accident while at work which caused me to become wheel chair bound for four months which limited Charlie from any exercise.. Living by myself no one could walk him. His exercise became no more. Now Charlie is very over weight Doctor said he needs to lose weight, Vet suggested Metabolic dry food by Hill’s Science Diet . Is home made recipes for dogs better for weight loss or this Rx dog food . Can someone give me some good advice . I am really considering home made. I invested in Science Diet healthy weight, Charlie refuses to eat. Is not appealing at all.
I started cooking for my three German Shepherds about 6 months ago, after a lot of frustration with diarrhea, allergies and other issues. Within a few days the diarrhea ended, then a few weeks later I noticed they were shedding less and not scratching anymore. One of my dogs had allergies so bad she needed injections every 8 weeks or she’d scratch her ears raw. Now she no longer needs the shots. They’re all pooping a small fraction of what they used to, so that means everything they’re eating is being used. Their coats are shiny and even strangers have commented on how healthy they look. I will never go back to commercial dog food. And they all LOVE the food!!! Now I need to add some homemade kibble to their diet.
For example, substituting one ingredient with another may seem innocent enough when the two ingredients are similar in our eyes, but for a dog’s body this may not be so. When you get a dog food recipe from a reputable source (and you double check with at least 2-3 other reputable sources), it’s important that you follow the recipe to the letter. If you need to substitute, make sure you research or better yet, consult with a canine nutritionist.

One of my three dogs has a very sensitive stomach, so I’ve taken over making meals for him. My typical recipe follows most closely to the beef dinner recipe below. I combine three pounds of 90 percent lean ground beef, frozen peas, and chicken broth in an Instant Pot LUX80 and put it on the Meat/Stew setting for one hour. Separately, I prepare two dry cups of Jasmine rice.

One of the pleasures of cooking a ham for a large gathering, obviously outside of eating it, is that the city hams we glaze and bake for holidays are already cooked. This should take the guesswork out of cooking a ham at home, right? But because most hams are quite large and have spiral cuts and giant bones to contend with, it can be hard to tell when a ham is actually “done” cooking. Here’s everything you need to know about ham temperatures for reheating and serving.
It’s important not to stray from homemade dog food recipes or substitute ingredients as you might for yourself and your family. Dogs have different nutritional needs that require cooking recipes exactly as instructed. Be sure to cook all animal products thoroughly to kill harmful bacteria and cook all grains, beans and starchy vegetables to make them easier for your pooch to digest.
The easiest way is to throw everything in a large slow cooker. 5 pounds regular ground beef, 3 pounds chopped beef liver, three cups of frozen or fresh veg and/or fruit, (carrots, peas, butternut squash, broccoli, blueberry, pumpkin etc.) 4 cups parboiled rice, 8 cups of water. 5 hours on high, longer on low and its done. A weeks worth in the fridge in what it was cooked in for an 80 lb dog. (substitute liver with any other organ, or rice with oats, quinoa, egg noodles, rice noodles).

Fantastic list! I loved every recipe, until I read #23. I don’t care how little it is, bacon is not good for any animal (although it’s one of MY favorite foods and I’ll eat it, but I won’t give it to my dogs). I read one blogger justify bacon in their dog treat recipe by saying that for the number of treats that their recipe provided, one piece of bacon wasn’t going to hurt a dog. That may be true, but it’s not worth it. Boiled chicken might be used instead. I guarantee dogs would love it, and it would be safer for them. Just as a reminder, the American Kennel Club states:

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