I’ve been making these for a long time now. My dog, Lola, knows by the smell when I’m baking for her and is in the kitchen the whole time! To make it easier, I use a pizza cutter and make 1x3” long strips instead of the bone shape. It is much faster with less rolling and these strips fit very nicely into Lola’s Kong. I use all natural peanut butter, and if I remember, get it freshly ground at the grocery store. I also buy the real Ceylon cinnamon to avoid any coumarin overdose if I give her too many treats.
Hi there, I made the Crock pot Beef and Rice meal and I was wondering how many cups per day should I be feeding my basset hound? I tried home cooked dog food because she refuses to eat store bought dog food. We would just leave the bowl filled normally. I know bassets have an issue with obesity so I don’t want to start feeding her too much. She’s a year old and weighs 40 pounds currently. How much should she be eating daily? Thank you!
Thanks, and the reason for the discrepancy is because I’ve added a couple more recipes to this list recently. I did update the title and heading and in the body of the article itself, but I haven’t updated all the images yet (one of them says 22, and the one at the top still says 23). Thanks for the reminder, it’s something I’ve been meaning to get around to.
Hi I hope your dog is eating now but if not I have a recommendation for you, my 8 month puppy stop eating kibble so I started cooking for him, this is my first dog so I don’t have so much experience. Weel after some months eating cook chicken with vegetables and other snacks he stopped eating again I think he got bored (again) so I bought greek gods greek yogurt (plain) and he love his food again, maybe you can try something like this.
It’s Earth Day — or Earth Month, as we prefer! — so naturally, we’re turning our focus to the kitchen. And specifically ways we can create less waste and be more efficient and thoughtful with our output. Between packaging and food scraps, some degree of kitchen waste feels inevitable. For most, there’s no way to eliminate it entirely, but there are a lot of small and easy ways to limit the amount of waste coming out of our kitchens.

Usually soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits are just that, soft and chewy. Not these. They were so hard and stale that my dog who normally won't eat any treats except the soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits, just looked at me with a glare as though to say, Are you kidding me?! So I tried to give them away to dogs I saw loose in the park. Again no deal. Amazon is great on some things but not Buddy Biscuits. Save your money and buy locally where you'll get the fresh, soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits.
Many dog food recipes fall short in certain nutrients, especially iron, copper, calcium, and zinc. Even some recipes created by veterinarians don't measure up. The University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine tested 200 recipes, many written by vets. The researchers found most of the recipes were short on some essential nutrients.
Many homemade dog food recipes don’t have a full range of vitamins and minerals. Unless you want to get very into adding supplements and so on to make sure your homemade is nutritionally balanced, I’d feed a mix of homemade and high quality kibble – kibble is already fortified with the necessary vitamins and minerals. I’d also double check the recommended protein/carb/fat balance for a puppy – what puppies need and what adult dogs need aren’t the same, so you might need to tweak the homemade food recipes to add or subtract rice and other carb sources to make the ratios right for a puppy. (This is particularly important for larger breed dogs as they need the right balance for joint and bone development for long term health.)
I cook I large sweet potato, about a quart of fresh turnip greens in 3 1/2 quarts of water which has 1 tablespoon of salt in it. When the water barely starts to boil I sprinkle a mixture of long grain white rice and brown rice in while stirring. Some times I add a pint of frozen mixed vegetables (with Lima beans). I set the stove as low as it will go and stir occasionally to be sure it is not sticking. You will think it is too much water but it will all be absorbed. I cook a large pack of chicken thighs in the oven at 280 degrees for about an hour and a half about every 4 days. I use 2 or 3 a day. When the other stuff is done I cut the 2 or 3 thighs up with the scissors and add some of the liquid from the cooking of the chicken. I dip up 2 and 1/2 cups of the mixture for each large dog 2 times a day. One time a day I crush one multiple vitamin and 2 glucosamine regular human vitamins and add to each big dog serving. Both times a day I add 1 tablespoon of dry milk. To each serving. Sometimes I use ground beef. And sometimes I add chicken livers.

Kelsie- My 10 yr old lab has mast cell. I met with a holistic vet after my vet wanted to keep her on steroids (which are not good). I am now cooking her food and this recipe does not give everything that’s needed and flour is not good. I also just started her on a drink for humans called NingXia Red. It’s expensive, but the holistic vet recommended it (she does not sell it either so she had nothing to gain from telling me this). Check with your vet or a holistic vet in your area on what you should be feeding. A lot of foods give off histamines which are not good for mast cell patients. Good luck!
When those are cooked and cooled, I mix everything together in a large mixing bowl and add one can of no salt added green beans and a 29 ounce can of pumpkin. It might take two batches to mix everything thoroughly (at least in the bowl I have). This feeds my 70 pound husky mix for four to five days, depending on how heavy-handed I am at feeding time.
Thanks, and the reason for the discrepancy is because I’ve added a couple more recipes to this list recently. I did update the title and heading and in the body of the article itself, but I haven’t updated all the images yet (one of them says 22, and the one at the top still says 23). Thanks for the reminder, it’s something I’ve been meaning to get around to.

Not sure what I did wrong but the dough turned out SOOOOO wet! I ended up adding another 1/2 cup of oats and another 1-1.5 cups of flour before I could work with it! And it was still very gummy. BUT I got it to work and they are now done. They hardened up well still. Just time to cool and let the pooch try them out! I’m sure he will love them but I’m just curious why my dough was so wet? Overall I’m still very happy with the base of this recipe and ingredients as some I’ve seen have me questioning if it’s a good idea to feed some of the ingredients to my pup. I did sub out canola oil for olive oil as well as I didnt have an canola!


I’ve been feeding my doggies my own recipe for dog food for the last few years and they all are doing so much better! (Investing in an Instant Pot is a life and time saver!) My 13 year old schnoodle got so much more pep back in his step after getting put on this diet. He still prances about. They have less intestinal issues and it saved me money. I’ll never go back. I make it daily and keep containers well stocked to miss some days of making if needed.

Interesting, my vet didn’t recommend Hill’s to us but I believe you. Now understanding the point made, I agree with you Twyla. If a dog food isn’t working for your dog and you’ve introduced it to them slowly then changing food is a good idea. As you said, homemade food is a good option as well as organic. In the end, each dog is different so you’ll need to play around with it until you find a healthy balance for your dog. Thanks for the comment and input Twyla!
This post totally cracked me up! Mainly because I have been thinking of making little pup treats for 2 weeks now. I’ve been hooked on Diane’s Gingie cookies (see OvenHug for the best gingie recipe eh=vah) and making them non-stop. Our finicky little chihuahua mix loves sharing bites with me. I want to make a gluten free version of my gingies so that our senior pup, Oscar can also join us – he has sensitive tummy issues. I just need to find a bone shaped cookie cutter and we’re in business. Thanks for the laughs. Your pup cookies look amazin’! Thanks for sharing. xo
Have you tried removing an ingredient each feeding to see if maybe it’s one specific thing she is allergic too …. otherwise it could be something environmental maybe the metel or plastic in the dish she eats from maybe a plant or pollen from a nearby plant materials from rugs or carpets … Also I feed honey to my allergy pup just drizzle a couple tablespoons over food as it’s anti fungel and helped tremendously with three of my allergy babies also plain yogurt I mix it with a little natural peanut butter and purred banana freeze for a treat in ice cube trey or small cups I wish you best of luck hope you find her some relief
I recently started making my dogs’ food, started as basically just a way of using up excess veggies, and lunch meat in lieu of throwing it away. Just run them– chicken, ham, beef, turkey lunch meat, along with my salad fixings–kale, spinach, cabbage, tomatoes– and the vegetables I mixed in with their wet food every night. Corn, broccoli, lima beans, carrots. Ran everything through the chopper..keep the veggies in one container, the meat in the other. For the first time in years, they eat every bite of their food. And added benefit? It’s WAY cheaper than the $9 a night (I have three big dogs) canned food I’ve been feeding them.
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