I do not know what discussion is going on, i do have some questions. I am new to all of this making your dog food and I wish i had done this from the start, but better late then never. I can only do Chicken or Turkey recipes, my male English Setter, can not eat beef, he has had 2 severe pancreatic attacks, once at 1 1/2, and then the camp ground managers stopped and gave him treats when we were gone, both times we almost lost him. That being said, with their weight, they get 1 cup of dry in the am & pm, should taht be what i feed to them with cooked or raw dog food?
It’s Earth Day — or Earth Month, as we prefer! — so naturally, we’re turning our focus to the kitchen. And specifically ways we can create less waste and be more efficient and thoughtful with our output. Between packaging and food scraps, some degree of kitchen waste feels inevitable. For most, there’s no way to eliminate it entirely, but there are a lot of small and easy ways to limit the amount of waste coming out of our kitchens.

Give them soft dog treats that are nutritious and delicious that puppies, adults and seniors will love to eat. In classic flavors like bacon, liver and cheese and chewy treats made with natural fruits and healthy greens, soft treats are the perfect way to reward your pup. Shop our large assortment of delightfully chewy and soft dog treats that are grain free, gluten free and contain natural ingredients your pet will truly enjoy.
Unless you are hunting and fishing for your dog… The proteins most people use are farmed. Chicken, beef, pork, fish of all varieties, used for human consumtion, are not the same as from the wild. Even “Organic” meats are still grown on farms. This brings about complications from denser populations that wolves and coyotes dont face when they eat raw. Most people agree Kibble is not a great choice…. The question then becomes is it natural to feed your dog raw farmed meat?

If your fur baby has a sweet tooth he will love these chews, and oatmeal adds protein and is good for digestion. To make these chewy treats, puree 1/4 C. diced peaches, 1 tbsp. canola oil, 1 tbsp. molasses, 1/4 tsp. vanilla and 1/8 C. water. Combine the puree with 2 C. rolled oats, 1/2 C. water, 1 C. flour and 1 tsp. cinnamon. Scoop spoon-sized dollops on to a lightly greased baking sheet, press them flat with the back of the spoon, and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes. These chewy cookie treats can be stored for two weeks in the refrigerator or six months in the freezer.
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