I was wondering about how much to feed my dog. The problem is I see things listing Giant Breeds as 75-100 pounds but my actually Giant of a dog is 165. I would like to transition him to a cooked diet but I don’t want to under or over feed him based on doing the math wrong. Do you have any charts or resources that can help me with an actual giant dog? This would hopefully include both food and vitamins.
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Hi Christi, I actually came here baking advice. Your cookies look awesome. I make my own also and am trying to make a business out of it but I’m having trouble as I am a real amatuer baker. My ingredients are 3 cups wheat flour, 2 tsp baking powder, 2 eggs, 1/2 cup chicken broth, 1/2 cup rolled oats, 1/4 sweet potato and 1 cup of pumkin. Bake 350 for 1/2 hr then rest in cooling oven 1 hr. They come out crunchy like i want but easilly broken. When rolling out the dough it is very dry and big cracks around the edge. Very labor intensive to get a batch baked!

Deviled eggs are one of the most universally loved apps and snacks. Put a plate down at any holiday get-together or gathering and it’s all but guaranteed they’ll be gobbled up in no time. I’m a purist at heart who believes you can never go wrong with the classic creamy, mustard-spiked filling, although there’s a nearly endless variety of ways to dress up and reinvent these two-bite snacks. Here are 10 of our favorite deviled recipe ideas to consider.
The opposite problem with DIY homemade dog food recipes is also very common – forgetting to include essential ingredients in your dog’s meal. I've mentioned some of these above – skipping on the vitamins, minerals, and amino acid supplements is often overlooked by pet owners. Samantha has previously explained which supplements may be required for homemade dog food meals, and how to use them safely.

I went online for advice about my dogs having a touch of the runs to be blunt and it seemed many said at first try changing to a bland diet of rice and chicken then I went looking for recipes for homemade dog food and found myself here and can honestly say I will never buy dog food from the store again and sure for just sake of a little time my dogs eat healthier and have a noticeable change in just one week and I reckon cost less to feed which I would pay more anyway if I thought it was good for them.


Oven baked with love and coated in raw goodness, the first biscuit treats that truly mirror a whole prey diet! Our Raw Coated Biscuits are full of meat and organ meat for a treat as nature intended that your dog will go wild for! We start with the world’s finest ingredients. Next we gently bake with love in small batches and finally we coat every biscuit in raw goodness to make the perfect treat!

“Quality control” doesn’t have a nice ring to it – anyone involved in the manufacturing of pet foods, pet medicine or other pet products that require quality control and monitoring by agencies like FDA and USDA do not want to hear about it, because it increases costs. This is why companies that make human-grade dog food and have frequent factory inspections (like The Honest Kitchen) have to raise costs for their pet food products.
When preparing DIY homemade dog food, it's likely you'll be making large quantities of it. After all, you don’t want to cook it every day. However, with the larger quantities come some potential storage problems. And not storing your pet's food properly in a special dog food storage container or fridge, not freezing when needed, is about as dangerous as not storing your own food in an adequate way.
What a load of crap. There isn’t a single good recipe that is appropriate for dogs here. Have you even watched the Canine Cancer Series? I’m looking for a good recipe for my sister’s dog (I feed raw & wouldn’t feed this garbage to any dog). 40% protein is crap. 80% protein is required. 10% offal 10% bone (added after cooking or a good bone meal supplement) any add ins like green leafy veggies & a very few berries would be in addition to this. Oats & rice are grains, sweet potato, apple, beets, peas. Nothing I’d feed my carnivore ever.
If your fur baby has a sweet tooth he will love these chews, and oatmeal adds protein and is good for digestion. To make these chewy treats, puree 1/4 C. diced peaches, 1 tbsp. canola oil, 1 tbsp. molasses, 1/4 tsp. vanilla and 1/8 C. water. Combine the puree with 2 C. rolled oats, 1/2 C. water, 1 C. flour and 1 tsp. cinnamon. Scoop spoon-sized dollops on to a lightly greased baking sheet, press them flat with the back of the spoon, and bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes. These chewy cookie treats can be stored for two weeks in the refrigerator or six months in the freezer.

Quick question…. I’m considering switching to homemade food for my dogs – one is a senior and one is moderately overweight – so I’m just trying to learn as much as I can. I notice there are certain ingredients listed in the Nutritional Guidelines for Calcium and Fatty Acids but none of the recipes include these things. Are these added as needed or should be part of each recipe? BTW…thank you for the great article and recipe ideas!


I recently started making my dogs’ food, started as basically just a way of using up excess veggies, and lunch meat in lieu of throwing it away. Just run them– chicken, ham, beef, turkey lunch meat, along with my salad fixings–kale, spinach, cabbage, tomatoes– and the vegetables I mixed in with their wet food every night. Corn, broccoli, lima beans, carrots. Ran everything through the chopper..keep the veggies in one container, the meat in the other. For the first time in years, they eat every bite of their food. And added benefit? It’s WAY cheaper than the $9 a night (I have three big dogs) canned food I’ve been feeding them.
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