Hi I am new to this site and have an Anatolian Sheperd and a Heinz 57 that I am going to start supplementing their kibble with your great recipes. I have a question on the yogurt and since I know it is a great probiotic how is it that dogs can eat it and not have digestive issues since it is dairy? My big guy weighs about 110 lbs and the gal about 60. She can eat anything he has a sensitive gut and I have been told a little yogurt wil help. Thanks
Fantastic list! I loved every recipe, until I read #23. I don’t care how little it is, bacon is not good for any animal (although it’s one of MY favorite foods and I’ll eat it, but I won’t give it to my dogs). I read one blogger justify bacon in their dog treat recipe by saying that for the number of treats that their recipe provided, one piece of bacon wasn’t going to hurt a dog. That may be true, but it’s not worth it. Boiled chicken might be used instead. I guarantee dogs would love it, and it would be safer for them. Just as a reminder, the American Kennel Club states:
I was thinking the same thing when I read them. I’m no nutritionist, but it is my passion and I’ve been studying human and animal nutrition for a long time. I’m glad somebody pointed this out. Steve, do you have a specific recipe you would use? I thought mine was great, but my dog apparently had sediment build-up in his bladder on a recent ultrasound. The vet hopes it’s just dehydration but thinks it could be his homemade diet. He said the sediment could come from excessive protein (which seems strange because I was just recently thinking his diet may be too carb heavy). Any tips would be awesome!
Also, keep in mind that each of these best homemade dog food recipes requires additional supplements such as zinc, choline, vitamin D and E, copper, calcium or others, depending on your dog's nutritional needs. The reason I haven’t listed them is that the correct dosages depends on the age, breed, size and pre-existing health conditions of your dog – you really must consult with a vet or canine nutritionist about these things.
my daughter gave me a deer head/ applehead chiahihiau for a late chritmas present she will be 1 year old the end of july I am noticeing the she will not eat the store boughten treats so I thought I would try homemade treats im also noticeing she will not play with toys I think because she was mistreated befor I got her I keep trying thank you for listening
To those of us who love deviled eggs (and we are legion), there is really no occasion that could not be made better by a platter of eggs stuffed with their own whipped yolks. Maybe that’s Easter lunch, their most native habitat, or a work party where everyone — even the most keto-devout! — can fall upon that plate of little morsels. But what about breakfast? Do deviled eggs belong at breakfast? Oh yes. And I have the recipe to prove it. 

I’m assuming you are changing over to a homemade diet because you have health concerns related to commercially produced dog food. Please research the contents of ALL commercial foods. You will be appalled. It ranges in offensiveness from low quality, to poisonous and downright carcinogenic. Proteins are frequently comprised of beaks, feathers, and high temperature steamed bonemeal. The most common source of “animal protein” is actually a meal that is produced using euthanized, ill farm and COMPANION animals…..as well as the medications that were in their systems when they were eventually determined to be terminal. There are a multitude of articles online with which you can educate yourself about the heinous nature of commercial dog food (yes, even the “premium” foods) so I guess the short answer is…..NO, if you care about what your dog is eating, don’t feed anything that you purchase human grade ingredients and prepare yourself! Btw, organic is best if you can afford it. The chemicals in human food are just as detrimental to your dog as they are for you, although having a shorter lifespan, they obviously won’t suffer some of the cumulative affects that humans do.
An important part of my dog’s diet is the kefir course, which she gets in the morning. The probiotic is important. It is homemade kefir with ground flax seed a little raw oats, and either flax or coconut oil. After that she gets a bowl of chicken or fish or leftover meat from my son’s unfinished meals, dal (chana or split peas or lentils) cooked with quinoa or rice (occasionally) or raw oats with veggies like carrots, small potatoescelery, yams or squash or even blueberries. Long ago with other dogs i fed raw lamb when i first read about homemade dog meals, but it is pricey now.I add greens to the stew but often she removes. Therefore i always add wheatgrass power. She gets oil or butter with every bowl of food, feeding the dal/rice/meat dish 2x day. She also gets vinegar in the dal along with indian spices and garlic. Some day yea some nay on garlic but i thing it is good. No onions or avocados. No chocolate or pizza or pasta. She gets the vinegar to help with itchy skin. The fish is generally raw or lightly poached. Their stomachs were designed to be able to handle raw meat. Sometimes she gets eggs lightly cooked, on the loose runny side. I add good homemade bone broths when cooking dal. I add liverwurst to pigs ears for snackage. I also add iodine drops to her water, which is never tap, except when in the park. I am in search of a non rip off vitamin and appreciate others’ comments herein regarding vitamins. And i always examine her . Not saying perfect but better than the hell of neverending kibble. Sometimes i give her a handful of kibble as a snack. Good to keep a small bag of good stuff for emergencies.

My little dog is 8 years old I have had her for about 2 months she is a rescue dog, we have bonded very much and she is health. A few days ago she stopped eating I have tried changing her dog food but she will have nothing to do with it and I have tried to give her chicken and hamburger but she wont eat that either. What should I do? Help I am getting very worried about. Thanks for your help.


What a load of crap. There isn’t a single good recipe that is appropriate for dogs here. Have you even watched the Canine Cancer Series? I’m looking for a good recipe for my sister’s dog (I feed raw & wouldn’t feed this garbage to any dog). 40% protein is crap. 80% protein is required. 10% offal 10% bone (added after cooking or a good bone meal supplement) any add ins like green leafy veggies & a very few berries would be in addition to this. Oats & rice are grains, sweet potato, apple, beets, peas. Nothing I’d feed my carnivore ever.
When is the last time you ever saw a Boston Terrier chasing down a cow to eat it? That doesn’t seem very natural or true to wild behaviors to me. Animals in the wild eat other wild animals who have been eating natural diets, kept in natural conditions, and are not exposed to man made drugs, hormones, chemicals, vaccines, and antibiotics. So to argue for a diet heavy in proteins that a dog would never eat on its own as being better than the recipes here seems unbalanced and not looking at the whole picture.
I went online for advice about my dogs having a touch of the runs to be blunt and it seemed many said at first try changing to a bland diet of rice and chicken then I went looking for recipes for homemade dog food and found myself here and can honestly say I will never buy dog food from the store again and sure for just sake of a little time my dogs eat healthier and have a noticeable change in just one week and I reckon cost less to feed which I would pay more anyway if I thought it was good for them.

Soft & chewy Buddy Biscuits are palatable with no crunch. An excellent choice for all dogs, especially older dogs or smaller dogs who prefer a softer treat. Along with indulging your pup, Buddy Soft & Chewy treats are also perfect for training, with a low calorie count and chock full of flavor to keep your dog motivated. Buddy Biscuits are also oven baked in the USA with only quality, recognizable ingredients. Healthy dog treats made with quality ingredients and natural peanut butter. Palatable, chewy dog treats perfect for older dogs. Baked in USA only. Contain no added corn, soy, fillers,artificial colors, flavors and artificial preservatives
Usually soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits are just that, soft and chewy. Not these. They were so hard and stale that my dog who normally won't eat any treats except the soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits, just looked at me with a glare as though to say, Are you kidding me?! So I tried to give them away to dogs I saw loose in the park. Again no deal. Amazon is great on some things but not Buddy Biscuits. Save your money and buy locally where you'll get the fresh, soft and chewy Buddy Biscuits.
I personally don’t consider 80 degrees F to be a bad temperature to walk your dog in. I live in Iowa and our summers days are often hotter than that, even in the evening around 5:30pm when I walk my dog. Like you said, I make sure to bring water with us and give her rests in the shade if need be. Overall, it’s important to know your dog’s tolerance level. For my dog, Sally, she is perfectly comfortable in those conditions. However, there are some dogs who may struggle in similar conditions.
It isn’t uncommon for a dog owner to decide to make homemade dog food. Whether you just want to save money or you want to make sure that you know what type of ingredients are going into your dog’s meals, it isn’t that difficult to do. The most important thing is to make sure they get foods that contain protein, calcium and other nutrients they need for energy.

Thank you Andrea, your formula makes much more sense, and remember reading about the tests for high protein, it is pretty much the formula I use as well. For people who are just treading water, a handful of their usual kibbles while they get their formula perfected would be advisable. And wean from there when they have confidence, or just continue to add that handful…but homemade dog food, when you get it right, is the bomb! If you have it down, you will see a huge difference in your pups. Both in appearance and energy. And really so easy, make up a month at a time and freeze in pound containers. And you are also recycling all those pound containers you would otherwise throw out. It’s all good. Jill


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I’ve raised my Shih Tzu since he was 10 weeks old, and he is currently 3 years old. Everyday he eats a different fruit/vegetable, typically with chicken, but he also occasionally he eats salmon, beef, pork (very sparingly since it can cause worms), and turkey. He also eats lentils, rice, beans, and oatmeal. I also add eggshell powder, nutritional yeast, Vitamin C, a small amount of garlic, and fish oil to their food. Variety is good — they need it to get proper nutrition. I’ve never had any dietary problems with him, his skin is healthy and he is energetic. I recently adopted a 8 yr old Llasa Aapso who was religiously fed so called high quality grain free kibble his entire life (I know this because I am related to the prior owner). He developed chronically itchy skin (with blisters and black scar tissue from scratching), and his owners did not know what to do with him. I immediately switched him over to a home made diet (like my Shih Tzu) and he immediately improved. I did give him the anti-fungal, anti-bacterial medication and prednisone the vet prescribed to initially improve (but not get rid of) his skin condition. The vet wanted me to give him the prescription diet and cortisone shots to keep the condition at bay. However, I refused because I know personally based on my own diet changes (I used to be 100+ pounds overweight and I lost it by eating better—not less— food) how feeding your body higher quality food can drastically change your condition. It has been a couple of months, and the Llasa is almost unrecognizable. I truly believe that feeding dogs commercially prepared dog foods leads to many ailments down the road. No human doctor would prescribe eating Total cereal, and a multivitamin to obtain optimum or even mediocre health. I don’t know why people think it is any different for animals and kibble (even high quality ones).
Originally from Chicago, Nicole Janiga joined the Chewy team as a marketing intern in January 2017. Since then, Nicole has continued writing and photographing for Chewy as a Content Collaborator while completing her education at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business. She is majoring in both marketing and corporate innovation, before returning to Chewy as a Marketing Analyst. In her free time, Nicole enjoys traveling, riding her horse or snuggling up with her Pug, @zoetheloaf, and Terrier, Cozmo.  
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