Lori Lapierre holds a Bachelor of Arts and Science in public relations/communications. For 17 years, she worked for a Fortune 500 company before purchasing a business and starting a family. She is a regular freelancer for "Living Light News," an award-winning national publication. Her past writing experience includes school news reporting, church drama, in-house business articles and a self-published mystery, "Duty Free Murder."
One of the pleasures of cooking a ham for a large gathering, obviously outside of eating it, is that the city hams we glaze and bake for holidays are already cooked. This should take the guesswork out of cooking a ham at home, right? But because most hams are quite large and have spiral cuts and giant bones to contend with, it can be hard to tell when a ham is actually “done” cooking. Here’s everything you need to know about ham temperatures for reheating and serving.
Dogs of all ages, from puppies to seniors, enjoy treats. Dog treats are a wonderful way to bond with your pet, give them something to chew on, reward them for good behavior or just to see them jump for joy. You'll find all their favorites at PetSmart, where we carry a wide selection of top brands. Snacks can even be part of their healthy diet every day, if used sparingly. Dental chews help keep their teeth clean and their gums healthy. Even pups with food sensitivities have a selection of gluten free, grain free, and natural dog treats to choose from. With real meaty bones, flavored dental treats, crunchy cookies and baked goods, rawhide, puppy treats and more, finding something they'll love is simple.
​No Crockpot?  No problem - just make a potato beef stew with whatever pot you have around the kitchen, your dog will appreciate the effort all the same. Amanda even takes it a step further and supplements her dog food with extra dog vitamins, which is a great idea. Just make sure you talk to the Vet first so they can receive the optimal level of nutrients needed for your dog.
In my experience that is odd. I have experienced the exact opposite in my dogs, and I have more rice and a ton of vegetable matter. Is the Rachel Ray food also a new thing for your dogs? Because kibble is typically associated with voluminous stools. Meat and carrots certainly wouldn’t cause this problem on their own. Are you cooking the game meat? I sure hope so…introduction of a raw protein might also cause loose as well as voluminous stool, not to mention being a potential source of parasitic infection, but that’s a whole nother issue.

The point of homemade dog treats is to stay away from preservatives, chemicals, dyes and all the other nonsense. Be smart. Do extensive research on the ingredients you wish to use and the alternative to each of them. Even if you think your dog has a ‘tolerance’ for milk, you should use it regardless unless you 100% know of any additives. In that case I just take milk right out of the equation. Theres no need for it anyway.


This Easter we were gifted a 22-pound ham (!!!) and while we had our share of Easter feasts, we’ve still got a decent amount left over. I’m not even a little bit mad, because I know I can freeze some for future use and that there are plenty of ways — big and small — that we can use it up this week. Here are 17 of my favorite recipes for using up leftover ham. City hams freeze incredibly well. My suggestion? Freeze the ham in different forms for future use.
Many good ideas here, however, I am absolutely appalled that you would suggest a dog eat dairy. A does not suckle a cow, a calf does. Dogs should also not be fed grains “as their ancestors did”. Wolves do not and have not ever eaten grains and as they made the transition to an omnivorous diet, still have never eaten grains. Dogs should ONLY be fed meat and vegetables, and fruit is also okay. Please correct this on your website as soon as possible so avoid giving false information to dog owners and potentially damaging their canines health.
I was wondering about how much to feed my dog. The problem is I see things listing Giant Breeds as 75-100 pounds but my actually Giant of a dog is 165. I would like to transition him to a cooked diet but I don’t want to under or over feed him based on doing the math wrong. Do you have any charts or resources that can help me with an actual giant dog? This would hopefully include both food and vitamins.
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The easiest way is to throw everything in a large slow cooker. 5 pounds regular ground beef, 3 pounds chopped beef liver, three cups of frozen or fresh veg and/or fruit, (carrots, peas, butternut squash, broccoli, blueberry, pumpkin etc.) 4 cups parboiled rice, 8 cups of water. 5 hours on high, longer on low and its done. A weeks worth in the fridge in what it was cooked in for an 80 lb dog. (substitute liver with any other organ, or rice with oats, quinoa, egg noodles, rice noodles).
I make food for my three dogs… The recipe is 1.5 cups of brown rice, 1.5 cups of brown lentils cooked in the instant pot for 23 minutes with 6 cups of broth and 3 sweet potatoes and a half cup of bone meal. Then I cook and food process 8 pounds of chicken or ham. Blend both parts together and refrigerate. I vary the meat from week to week as well as the veggies.
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